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Full text of "Antioch News 01/01/1999"

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ANTI 




HNEWS 



Five Sections 



— - 5 .?,PM? S ... it, J!$W ^HM^l^L A Ukeland Newspaper /75 cents 



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Working toward confe 





Four plans now exist; NSC, FVC expansion are the two most likely plans 



ByLEEF!LAS& 
BRENDAN O'NEILL 
Staff Reporters 



Joining a conference is not 
something that is done on a whim. It 
takes planning, research, and above 
all, time— which is something that 
Round Lake High School, Grant 
Community High School and 
Wauconda Community High School 
do not have. 

These independent schools seek 
conference affiliation before more 
students lose the benefits they right- 
fully deserve. 

After the Northwest Suburban 
Conference (NWSQ was dismantled 



three years ago, these three schools 
were left out in the cold as the other 
members of the conference scram- 
bled to become part of existing 
conferences. 

"Our academic 
and sports achieve- 
ments for kids are 
suffering from not 
being in a confer- 
ence," said Frank Cittadino, Grant 
Community High School athletic 
director. "It's a tough spot to be in. 
We need to find a conference." 

Over the past three weeks, 
numerous scenarios have come 
to light that would give the three 
independents a conference to 




call home. 

The. two most obvious scenarios 
would be expansion of the North 
Suburban Conference (NSC) and 
expansion of the Fox 
Valley Conference 
(FVC); 

The expansion of 
the NSC, which 
Includes former 
members of the NWSC in Antioch 
High School and Warren Township 
High School, is the main scenario 
being talked about today, but the 
FVC has also toyed with the idea of 
expansion, possibly absorbing the 
three independents and Johnsburg, a 
school that travels two hours to play 



teams in its conference, the Big 
Northern Conference, Red Division. 
What will become of it? 

North Suburban 
Expansion 

The most viable solution for the 
Independents would be to accept an 
invitation to join the NSC, if and 
when it expands. 

fin recent weeks, the NSC has 
looked into expanding from an eight 
team conference to a 10 or 12 team 
conference, but nothing concrete has 
been brought to the table, as of yet; 

Please see AFFILIATION IA8 




PICKING UP THE PIECES 

\j Part II: j 
Finding A Solution 



V 




Sequoit Pride promotes involvement in 
school activities by everyone in Lake Villa, 



•^wV-.T> 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



S 



equoit Pride has* donated 
$19,000 to Antioch Commu- 
nity High School organiza- 
tions and programs. 
People in Lmdenhurst, Lake . 




\ New Year ; always brings 
lha desire for : -a new body 

miwm and 

■ ; ::TH|E..V 

; Our crttics.rwtew the 1998 




Villa; and Antioch have played a lot 
of golf, bought a lot of socks and 
snacks, and wear a lot of boxer 
shorts to make that possible. 

One new program funded by 
Sequoit Pride will send six students 
to Washington, D.G to participate in 
the 30-year old Presidential Class- 
room program. 

Go Sequoits! • 

These efforts by the Sequoit 
Pride volunteer organization contin- 
ue to build and help provide a 
strong academic program for 
students at the school. 

"The $19,000 was raised In the 
last year," said President Dr. John 
Sladek. He said they met on 
Wednesday, Dec 2 to make alloca- 
tions. 

Sequoit money was given to: the 
Math Fair, the Chemistry Can be 
Fun Program, students participating 
in the Chemical Education Program, 
Youth for Environmental Study 
Camp, Band-a-Rama, and Finesse 
Magazine. 

Extracurricular programs also 
were given support This included 



Sisters and Co-Chairs of the Sequoit pride Spirit Shop, Karen Chllcote of Lake Villa and Karol Hlntz, 
of Antioch, show off some of the Antioch Community High School merchandise for sate. The two 
women, along with other parent and teacher volunteers, sell the merchandise at the home game 
concession stand, homecoming spirit week, back-to-school night, and freshman information night 
Proceeds have allowed numerous purchases of Items for the school's arts; athletics, activities, and 
academics.— Photo by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 



the Music, Drama, and Athletic 
Departments. Tuition fees, dance 
team costumes, and guest conduc- 
tors were funded 

"This year we're trying to do 
new things," said Sladek. As a result, 
for the first time, Sequoit Pride will 
help six students meet tuition costs 
if they are selected to participate in 
the Presidential Classroom program. 



The week-long Presidential Class- 
room program takes place in June. 

Presidential Classroom offers 
students a week in Washington with 
government officials. They watch 
the process of legislation and leam 
the roles of voters, lawmakers, . - 
committees, and lobbyists. 

Becky Hockney participated in 
Presidential Classroom in 1992. She 



discussed the program with the 
Sequoit Pride Executive Committee 
In early December. 

"She presented a very exciting 
and career expanding view of this 
experience in Washington," Sladek 
said. "If sa good program." 

ACHS students will soon be 

Please see PRIDE I A3 



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INDEX 



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Village census 
shows population 
now 7,093 

By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

The Village of Antioch is now 
home to 7,093 people. 

The results of a special census 
taken last summer were announced 



by the village at the Monday, Dec. 21 
, board meeting. 

"The current, correct', census 
count Is 7,093 people," said Marilyn 
Shineflug. ,■'.... 

Village officials also have been 
notified that, as a result of the 
population increase, Antioch will 
receive, an increase of state tax 
revenues that are based on popula- 
tion. ' 

Village Manager Tim Wells 
presented trustees with a summary 
of projected revenue as a result of the 



988 person Increase over Antioch's 
1990 population. As a result of the 
population Increase, Antioch will 
receive an additional $102,110 
annually starting last month, No vem- 
ber.1998. 

, The revenue Increase is from ' 
motor fuel taxes, state income taxes, 
and other taxes such as those related . 
to photograph processing and a state 

use tax. 

One motivation for village 
officials to undertake a census count 
In the later parts of a decade Is to 



increase revenue from sources that 
use population as a basis to deter- 
mine municipal payments. 

That Is the primary reason 
communities do it," said Robert 
Silhari, Director of the Planning, 
Zoning and Building Department 
Another reason is to monitor growth 
in a village. - 

"Yes, the village is growing," said 
Silhari. "We have subdivisions in 
every sector of the community." 

Please see CENSUS I A3 




For home delivery, calf (847) 740-4035; For ads, call (847) 223-8161 



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January 1,1999 



COMMUNITY 

^BpHIHlWIlMNHfl 




Lakeland Newspapers/ l 



FROM PAGE Al 



PRIDE:Supports students 



notified of the application process 
so they may begin to prepare for 
the experience. 

Sequolt Pride serves as a way 
for parents and people in Linden- 
hurst, Lake Villa, and Antioch to 
actively help improve the quality 
of their children's educational ex- 
perience. 

"There's a growing recognition 
in communities that parents need 
to be involved," said Sladek. 
"There are many benefits of par- 
ents being involved as'a partner- 
ship with the school system." 

One benefit also might be that 
people can play golf and support 
their high school at the same time. 

"The golf outing is.in mid- 
July," said Sladek. Jim Hintz and 
Steve Schoenfelder are the orga- 
' nizers of the golf outing. 

Every year the outing becomes 
more popular, attracts more play- 
ers and supporters, and con- 
tributes a strong portion of trie 
. money that Sequolt Pride is able to 
distribute. 

. "We have our golf outing and 
we have our concessions," Sladek 
said. The third major fund-raising 
source is the sale of spirit wear, 
clothing and souvenirs. 
. At school athletic events, the 
concession stands are managed by." , 
Sequolt Pride. "There" have been a 
lot of people who have worked the 
concession stand selflessly," said 
Sladek. "Last year it was Ellen 
Ipsen. She made sure volunteers 
were working every event." 

This year, Michelle Fuller and 
, Cherie Basler have responsibility 
for the concession stand sales. 
They sell food at home games as 
; well as thundersticks and spirit 
i wear. ^ \ 

Thundersticks are sold for a 
• dollar and are not eaten. 

"We talked about coming up 
with a novel item," said Karol 
Hintz. 

She helps her sister, Karen 
Chilcote, sell the spirit wear that 
Sequoit Pride makes available to 
parents and students. Thun- 
dersticks make a noise when 
whapped against the hand and arc 
usually waved to express support;- 

"The kids in basketball love 
them," she said. "It's a visual 
thing." 

"Our socks are the biggest sell- 
ers," said Hintz. "All the kids just 
absolutely love them." The socks 
are white with cranberry stripes 
and cost $5.50, or two for $10. 
"It says 'Sequoits' on both 
sides of the sock" 

"They're custom made for us." 
"We've got big new golf um- 
brellas. They're big," she said. 
"They're stripped in our colors 
and have our logo." 

"Our big seller lately has been 
boxers and flannels," said 
Chilcote. "We can barely keep 
them in stock." 

There are two styles of the 
boxer shorts. One has Antioch 
printed all over it, and the other 
has the shield logo all oyer. 

ACHS spirit wear has been sold 
for over a decade. However, it is 



not sold in downtown stores 
which also have Antioch Hfgh 
School merchandise for sale. "We 
don't want to step on their toes," 
Chilcote said. "We're happy they 
sell." 

Many merchants In downtown 
Antioch are supportive of school 
programs and donate time, mon- 
ey, and merchandise to school 
events throughout the year. "We 
appreciate what the businesses do 
for the school." 

Spirit wear sold by Sequoit 
Pride' includes sweatshirts, T- 
shirts, afghans and stadium blan- 
kets, key chains, hats, logo stickers 
for vehicles, denim shirts, head 
bands, seat cushions, and visors. 
"I think we're very competi- 
tively priced," said Chilcote. She 
said that Sequoit Pride does make 
a profit on what they sell, but it's 
not exorbitant. 

"We can personalize items 
with names," Chilcote said. 

Chilcote and Hintz register a 
lot of sales at the school's home 
"games: "Sometimes the National 
Honor Society helps out," she said. 
"If anyone wants to buy stuff; : 
just come to a home basketball 
game," Chilcote said. 

The next basketball game is 
Tuesday, Jan. 5 against Round "i 
Lake High School in Antioch 's 
gymnasium. 

[ According to Sladek, Sequoit 
Pride is about pride in the school. 
It is a group involved with the 
school. The executive committee 
members include Sherrill Tripp 
and Dutchie Vanderkooy, who 
serve as secretary and treasurer re 
spectively. Miml Denoma handles 
: publicity».and Sue Ryan arid Steye 
Ryan'af e responsible for memtiepF/ 
ship. *' ' ■ 

Other executive committee 
participants include Sue Latino for 
AMPS, Lil Gofran for ALL Parent 
Network, and Jim Hintz for mem- 
bership at large. Superintendent 
Dr. Dennis Hockney and Principal 
Dr. James Love also meet with the 
committee. 

Sladek is president. Hintz and 
Chilcote are in charge of Spirit 
Wear sales. 

"We can always use help," 
Sladek said. He encourages people 
to call Jim Love at the high school 
and let him know they would like 
to get involved. 

Sequoit Pride donations to the 
school go beyond these awards ' 
announced in early December. 
During the past seven years, the 
organization has provided consid; 
erable support to the school, 

The North Gymnasium floor 
covering and sound system is a Se : 
quoit Pride contribution. The 
group also partially outfitted the 
Marching Sequoits Band with new 
uniforms. Sequoit Pride has pro- 
vided computers, scanners, and 
software for classroom use. 

"Sequoit Pride exists to foster a 
strong sense of community pride in 
Antioch Community High School," 
according to the mission statement. 

"We stand ready to help If 
asked," said Sladek. 




Food for thought 

Rich KufalK and Bruce Ahlquist, both of Antioch, of the Antioch Lions Club load food to be delivered 
for the holidays at the Antioch Rescue Squad. Lions Clubs members prepared holiday baskets for 
both the Thanksgiving arid Christmas holiday seasons. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 

Village schedules Deercrest workshop 

Housing developer plans to 
resubmit project for approval 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Village officials will meet In early 

January to discuss the proposed Deer- 

• crest Planned Unit Development 



Unit Development 

"It's a public meeting, but not a 
public hearing,"said Shineflug. ; . 

The public is welcome to attend 
to listen to the presentation and 
comments, but no public testimony 



Itjvould be a workshop ^es-v.-^ will be taken. 
* sion," said Mayor Marilyn Shineflug,..*. '„. ~* Public comments will bo perniifc 



'We're proposing a special joint 
meeting." 

Hie meeting will be Tuesday, 
Jan. 12 at 7:30 p.m. In the council 
chambers. 

The Combined Plan Commis- 
sion and Zoning Board and the Vil- 
lage Board of Trustees will meet to- 
gether to learn more about proposed 
changes for a Deercrest Planned 



ted at a future meeting if the-Xfeer- 
crest Planned Unit development fs 
brought before the village for con- 
sideration. Were plans to be resub- 
mitted to the Combined Plan Com- 
mission and Zoning Board, there 
would be a hearing. If the plans axe 
submitted to the Village board, there 
would be a hearing. 

The workshop session is intend- 



ed to be a an opportunity for 
• trustees, planning, and zoning offi- 
cials to listen to some proposals and 
improvements for Deercrest 

No official action will be taken at 
the meeting. 

Deercrest is proposed for devel- 
opment on 234-acres north of the 
Savage Road and Route 173 intersec- 
tion. It was originally proposed as a 
residential development featuring a , 
v variety of home styles, such as town 

...Ihprnes jnd singlejaml ly homes, with 
large areas of open space. 

The Combined Plan Commis- 
sion and Zoning Board voted Oct 8 
to recommend to the Village Board 
that the proposed development be 
denied. Deercrest was withdrawn 
from further consideration, at the re- 
quest of the developers, and has not 
been brought before the village 
council for consideration. 



Land Conservancy seeks volunteers 



Antioch News 

Vol. 114 No. 1 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 



Member ot Illinois Pre** Assoc 

Look for us on the Internet at 
WWW.LPNEWS.COM 



(USPS 027-080) EdlIW(a | offi«: 

30 South Whitney Sl„ Grayslake, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8161 

Office of Publication; 30 Soulh Whimsy St. Ofayslaka. II 60030. Ptiona (047)223-8 1 SI. 

Published woekly, periodical rnaa postage pold al Grayslake, IL 00030 

Home Delivery Betes: K4.30 p* yea/ In UHe, Cook, Kenosha and McHorwy Counties; 

elsewhet e $40.00 per year by mail paid in advance. 

Postmaster Send address cnangts to Anlioch News, 30 South Whitney Street, P.O. Bo* 260, Qfayslake. IPinoie 60030. 



WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publisher 
KAREN OTOOLE 

Circulation MQt. 

BOB ULMER 

. Display Advertising Mgr, 

MAUREEN COMBS 

Classified Advertising Mgr, 



M.R. SCHROEDER 

Founder- 1 904*1 986 



NEAL TUCKER 

Composition MgrjExecullve Editor 



Vi 



WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

President 
MIMI KOOB 

Comptroller 

CORKEY GROSS 

Public Relations Manager 

YJ^IISRHDNDA HETRICK BURKE 

^wrwiaNO^ Managing Editor 



The Land Conservancy of 
lake County is looking for a stu- 
dent or volunteer, or both, to serve 
as chair of their Education and En- 
vironmental Committee. The per- 
son would be responsible for orga- 
nizing and assisting students and 
members of the conservancy to 
promote issue awareness. 

This sounds like an opportunity 
for someone in Antioch Commu- 
nity High School's Environ- 
mental Club to serve on a county- 
wide organization protecting wet- 
land areas and donated land 
parcels. 

Interested people are invited to 
call them at 356-6001. 

The Antioch U. S.. Postal Retail 
Store is scheduled to open around 
Monday, Feb. 1. Once everything is 
working smoothly, there will be a 
'grand opening' ceremony sched- 
uled. 

"Everybody loves these stores 
when they open," said Tim Rati If! 
of the U.S. Postal Service. "It's 
worth waiting for." 

Money continues to help build 
the Antioch Public Library District. 

"We were able to give a check 
for $1,200," said Nancy Brown. 

She is co-president, with Mike 
Brown, of Antioch Library Friends, 
a group of volunteers that help the 
' library. 

"We presented it Wednesday 
(Dec. 16) at the staff and volunteer 




OUR 
TOWN 

KenPatchen 



luncheon at the library." 

"They're looking for book sug- 
gestions and material suggestions/' 
Brown said. 

the library will begin to buy 
new materials for the collection 
with the proceeds of the recently 
passed referendum in the upcom- 
ing year. 

People who have ideas can mail 
them in, 757 Main Street, call them 
in to Amy Blue, 395-0874, or drop 
them in the suggestion box by the 
entrance. 



Noah Poole was renamed i 
Commander for U. S. Coast Guard 
Flotilla 06-11-9 WR at their Change 
of Watch Dinner Friday, Dec. 18. 
This is his second year. 

"I like it," he said. "It's a lot of 
challenge." 

The group teaches people boat 
safety and conducts vessel safety in- 
spections. 

"We teach classes at Antioch 
Moose Lodge, Grant Township 
Hall, First National Bank of Chica- 
go, Pedersen's Marine, and 
Nielsen's Enterprises." 

"We did 30 classes this year," he 



said. % 

"We need more working volun- 
teers." 

People who want to help him 
out can reach Poole at 356-7216, or 
by fax at 356-6307. 

The Lake Villa-based Land 
Conservancy of Lake County 

will host their tenth annual meeting 
at the Lake Villa Public Library on 
Wednesday, Jan. 13, 1999 at 7 p.m. 

The guest speaker will be Col- 
lege of Lake County instructor Lin- 
da Curtis, a botanist and author of 
"Aquatic Plants of Northeastern Illi- 
nois." Autographed copies of her 
book about the local water plants 
will be available at the meeting. The 
book includes photographs and de- 
scriptions of plants in a very read- 
able style. 

The Land Conservancy of Lake 
County, which is a member of the 
National Land Trust Alliance, main- 
tains lands donated to it all over Lake 
County. Donated lands are from pri- 
vate donations or from developers 
who seek to have areas protected for 
their natural resource value. 

The membership will elect di- 
rectors to the board at the meeting. 

Light refreshments will be 
served. 



If you have interesting information 
or anecdotes to submit for "Our 
Town" call staff reporter Ken 
Patchenat223'816i, ext. 131 ore- 
mail, edit@lnd.com," 










A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



NEIGHBORS 



January 2, 1999 



Neighbors 




Name: Michele Michel. 

Home: Grayslake. 

Occupation: Co-owner, with Sandy 
Leibolt, of Something Sweet- Fudge 
Candy and Gift Shop in Antioch. 

Community involvement: Member 
of the Chamber of Commerce and In- 
dustry, We donate our fudge to many 
local organizations and try to support 
good causes. 

I'm originally from: Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

My family consists of: My husband, Dan, our 13-year old 
daughter, Ashley, and 2-year old daughter, Abby. 

My pets are: A Cairn Terrier named Trouble. 

What I like best about Antioch: I think it is like a Norman 
Rockwell town with quaint shops and friendly people. 

What I like best about my job: Helping people, treating them 
better than they ever expect, making them feel they are a welcomed 
guest. 

The secret to my success is: Believing that 1 have something 
to offer people. I have been blessed by parents who really support 
me. I always try to do things the best they can be done., 

I relax by: Sitting on the patio or taking a drive with our family. 

My perfect day in Antioch would be: A relaxing dinner at Di- 
Marco's Restaurant followed by a production at PM&L Playhouse. 

Last book I read: I cannot remember. I usually try to keep up 
with my teenager's magazines so I'm in tune with her world. 

Favorite TV show is: "Friends." 

Favorite movie is: "The Sound of Music." 

Favorite music: Country, old Frank Sinatra songs. 

Favorite restaurant: Bob Chinn's Crabhouse in Wheeling or Di- 5 
Marco's Restaurant in Antioch. 

Favorite band or musician: Garth Brooks, Celine Dion. 

My life's motto is: All things work out for good. 

If I could be anyone in history, I would be: A friend of 
Princess Diana's. I feel I could have learned so much from her. 

If I won the lottery, I would: Help out my family so their lives 
would be easier. I would find the best organization to help abused 
and neglected children and work with them to help all these children. 

My greatest accomplishments are: My relationship with my. 
husband and my girls. My husband and 1 started a community tennis 
club when we lived in upstate New York and ran it for five years. It is 

still going on today. .. ^ v .._ 

I want-to be remembered as: Someone who really cared about 
people, a person who respected children. 

My pet peeve is: Bad customer service. There is no excuse for it.. 

Most famous person I ever met was: Jim Cameron, Director 
of "Titanic." I met him and his parents in October and they loved our 
fudge! 

My dream job would be: Exactly what I am doing. This is me. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Hawaii 
with my husband. It's our favorite place and we hope to retire on 
Kauai. 



If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column, call Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 223-8161, 



MOVIES AND TIMES START JANUARY 1, 1999 



LAKE ZURICH (847) 550-0000 
755 S. Rand Rd. 



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ANTIOCH (847) 395-0216 • 
378 Lake St. Antioch • 



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A New Year, nothing changes 



Well, we find ourselves 
once again faced with 
the prospects of a 
new year. A new be- 
ginning, a time to start fresh, obtain 
financial security, achieve emotion- 
al stability, and acquire the perfect 
size 6 waist. Ah yes, that time of 
year filled with hope and pipe 
dreams. 

As we begin our step into the 
next millennium, we would like 
nothing better than to start out 
with reachable goals and attain- 
able desires. Unfortunately, we . 
are egged on by those ego smash- 
ing holiday letters we all receive 
from our cousins in Paducah. 
None of us are immune from the 
epilogues of "Life is Perfect in Pa- 
ducah" scenarios. : 

There are relatives on this 
writers family tree that actually 
grace us with a one page per 
child synopsis of their year; they 
have four children. One is taking 
art lessons at The Art Institute, 
one is dancing with the Joffrey 
Ballet, one plays lead flutist with 
the Chicago Symphony and one 
is studying Marine Biology at the : 
Shedd Aquarium. And, I thought 
we were having a good year be- 
cause our 6-year-old has aced 
every spelling test so far. 

Nothing like a good old family 
letter to remind you of how pathetic 
and purposeless your life is, not to 
mention making you feel like the 
slug of the family tree. 

If 1 were to designate my holiday 
letter to this family's accolade, there 
would be enough print to fill a post- 
card and still have plenty of room for 
the address and that bar code they 
splatter across the bottom so you 
can't read the senders signature. 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

LynnPringle 



Does anyone really care that these 
nieces and nephews actually double 
date, willing share household 
chores, help each other with their 
homework, and sing Kumbiah each 
day around the dinner table. 

A productive day for us is get- 
ting all four kids to sit at the table at 
one time, without any pinching, 
grabbing, pulling, or pushing going 
on. And to be truly successful, a 
meal may even be eaten. And so the 
new year looms ahead of all of us 
like a runaway train. The pressure is 
on to achieve some sort of accom- 
plishment in this upcoming year 
that will be worthy of next seasons 
holiday letter. 

Well, hopefully we will all 
succeed in our latest endeavors, 
and if we don't look on the bright 
side, plain old Christmas cards 
containing the names of the . 
members of your family are still 
acceptable. 

And for good measure, why not 
throw in one of those family por- 
traits with everyone dressed in ' 
complimenting colors and the fam- 
ily dog and cat sitting peacefully 
side by side. 

• .Welcome to a new year. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle." 

Readers with information for "Jingle 
from Pringle" should call Lynn 
Pringle at 395-6364. 



Free Adoption Seminar, 

Anyone contemplating adoption should 
attend this informational seminar 

Wednesday, January 6, 1999, 7:00 P.M. 

Family Counseling Clinic 
19300 West Highway 120 • Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

Infants and toddlers available from: 

China, Poland, Vietnam, Bulgaria, Russia, India and Guatemala 

Space is limited, please call 847-223-8107 to register 
or for more information ask for Ginny Mann. 




THE NEWEST 
HAWAIIAN ISLAND 

byJIMWARNKEN, < 
President, North Star Travel, Inc. 

The most well known is, of course Oahu, home to Honolulu arid the world famous 
Waikiki Beach. 

Many of you may also be familiar with Maui, the second most visited Hawaiian 
island, both by humans and whales! 

Then there's my personal favorite, Kauai, nicknamed "Hawaii," but commonly known 
as the "Big Island, since it is twice as large as all the other islands put together, and 
still growing. You can watch it grow as the lava (lows to the sea from the active 
volcanoes in Volcanoes National Park. More about that later. 

Lesser known are Molokai, home to the friendliest people on earth, and its little sister, 
Lanai with only 2,600 residents, 16,000 acres of pineapples and spectacular Jack 
Nicklaus designed golf course. 

But have you heard of Lo'ihi, Hawaii's newest island? 

Even though Lo'ihi is only about eighteen miles southeast of the Big Island, its first 
visitor did not arrive until 1987. No, that's not a "typo." No one saw this island until 
about nine years ago and the chances are you won't be able to visit it for another half- 
million years, 

You see, Lo'ihi's highest mountain is still about 3,200 feet below the surface of the 
ocean and unless you can get an invite to join the University of Hawaii's Undersea 
Research team in their state-of-the-art, three passenger submersible, it's going to be a 
long time before anyone else gets an up-close look at the newest Hawaiian island. 

However, as mentioned earlier, you can safely view (from above water) the island 
building process at Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island. That's where Kilauca 
Carter has been erupting for the last 13 years, adding hundreds of acres to the island. 

The best time for volcano viewing is dawn or dusk. The glow of the lava is lost in 
daylight, and at night you lose the depth of field. The Park Service monitors the flows 
daily and decides on access as the flow dictates. Sometimes you can get right up to the 
lava, other times you have to keep your distance, A recorded update on access can be 
heard by calling (808) 967-7977. 

Skip the beach 6;a day on your Hawaiian vacation and watch an island being built. 

NORTH "^W^ STAR 



CRUISES 

Lindcnhurst 

www.rorthstartravel.com 




356-2000 



Calendar 



Friday, Jan. 1 

New Year's Day 



Lakes Region Historical Society 
museum in Antioch is closed for 
the month of January, will re-open 
March 6 at 11 a.m. 

Saturday, Jan. 2 

7:30 p.m., a "Closed, Cocaine 
Anonymous" support group will 
meets at Victory Memorial 
hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd. In 
Waukegan, call 360-4090 for Info. 

Sunday, Jan. 3 

7-9 p.m. Open Gym at ACHS, cost 
$2, adults only. 

Monday, Jan. 4 

Antioch Community High School 
re-opens 

r • : -"• "" 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 

......,..,..„., 

7 p.m. Northwest Educational 
Group meets at Lake Villa Adminis- 
trative complex- 

7 p.m., Antioch Garden Club 
meets in the Maplethorpe Room at 
the Antioch Comm. Center, visitors 
welcome, for more, call 395-3803 

7 p.m. Bingo at Antioch Moose 
Lodge, Rte. 173 west of Antioch 

v • ■ •* • ;•-■ 

7 p.m. Network of Friends, Multi- 
ple Sclerosis support group meets 
at Antioch Moose Lodge 

7:30 p.m., Village of Antioch ' 
Board meeting at Village Hail 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community 

Band at Antioch Community High 

School, information at 395-5566 
* , , 

Tuesday, Jan. 5 - - ■ ■ 

i 6:45 pirn, i Antioch VFW ; Birigo,"b J 
efreshments available. Doors open^S 
at 4:30 p.m.; call 395-5393 

7-9 p.m., Antioch Boy Scout Troop 
92 meets at Antioch Scout House 
in Williams Park 

■ 

: .. ....■ 

7 p.m., A.MiP.S/ meeting in the 
band room of ACHS 

7:30 p.m. St. Peter -Council of 
Catholic Women meet at parish 
hall, call 395-0274 

Wednesday, Jan. 6 

Sequoit Board of Directors meets 

7-9 p.m., Northern Lake County 
Quitter's Guild meets at State Bank 
of the Lakes In Lindenhurst, for 
info, call Valerie at 838-2126 

7:30 p.m., Sequoit Pride meeting 
held at ACHS 

Thursday, Jan. 7 

7 a.m., "You Make a Difference" 
breakfast at ACHS cafeteria 

6:30 p.m., ACHS School Board 
meeting in school library 

7 p.m. American Sewing Guild , 
group "Running in Stitches meets 
at State Bank of the Lakes in 
Lindenhurst, call 356-0304 

Coming soon 

January 11 

6-8:15 p.m., Lake County ' 
Business & Professional Women 
sponsors a dinner, presentation by 
a financial planner on "New Tax 
Laws affecting individuals and 
organizations," and the regular 
meeting at State Bank of the 
Lakes, 50 Commerce Drive, in 
Grayslake, must have RSVP'd by 
December 7th for the dinner, call 
566-7397 for more information 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for Cristlna Feindt 
223-8161, ext. 141. 



January 1, 1999 



POLICE & FIRE 



Lakeland Newspapers! A5 



POLICE BEAT 

Persons charged with a crime arc innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. 



ANTIOCH 



Apprehended on warrant 

Aniioch Police Officers stopped 
Joshua S. Johnson, 27, of Fox Lake, 
on Saturday, Dec. 19 at 2:30 a.'m. 
traveling west bound on Route 173 
approaching Route 83 in a red 1991 
Isuzu Carryall. 

He was arrested on an outstand- 
ing warrant issued by the Lake Coun- 
ty Sheriffs Office. Johnson was re : 
leased on bond pending a court date 
of Friday,* Jan. at 9 a.m. In 
Waukegan. 




ion 



Illegal transport 
of alcohol 






Cannabis 

Antioch Police Officers charged 
David Cote; 19, of Antioch, with pos- 
session of cannabis. He was stopped 
Dec. 21 at 12:31 a.m . on Nelson Road 
at 128th Street in a gray 1993 
Oldsmobllejby police. 

Cote was' released on bond 
pending a court date of Wednesday, 
Jan. 27 at 10:30 am In Grayslake. ' 

Charged with Dili 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
John B. Cunningham, 24, of Antioch, 
on Dec. 19 at 12:22 a.m. traveling 
north bound on Bridgewood Drive 
south of Timber Lane In a blue 1990 
Honda all-terrain vehicle. 

He was charged with driving un- 
. der the influence. Cunningham was , 
released on bond' pending a court 
date of Tuesday, Jan. 12. 

DU I, warrant 

Antioch Police Officers Initiated 
a traffic stop of a vehicle driven by 
Stephen R. Church, 46, of Trevor, on 
Dec, 22 at 1:57 a.m. traveling south 
bound at Lake Street and Route 59 in 
a red 1991 Chevrolet Metro. 

Ho was charged with driving un- 
. der- the 'influence an'd on -ah out- 
standing warrant. Church was re- 
leased on bond pending a court date 
Jan. 12 at 9 a.m. 

UNDENHURST 

Charged with criminal 
damage 

Lindenhurst Police Officers in- 
vestigated four incidents of criminal 
damage to property involving con- 
struction equipment on Tuesday, 
Dec. 22. 

The first incident on Farmington 
Drive involved nine broken glass 
windows on two Kobelco backhoes.. 
The estimated value of damage was 
$1000. . 

A second incident on Farming- 
ton Drive involved four broken glass 
windows on a Caterpillar road grad- 
er. The estimated value of damage 
was $500. 

' A third incident in the 200 block 
of Jasmine Circle involved three bro- 
ken windows, a windshield?and two 
side windows on a Koehring excava- 
tor', and a broken windshield, driver- 
side window, and headlight on a 
Grumman storage van. The estimat- 
ed value of die damage was $1,300. 

A fourth incident on Haven Lane 
involved one broken window on a 
Liebherr bulldozer and three broken 
windows on a Hitachi excavator. 
The estimated value of the damage 
was $1,300. 

Charged with DU1 

. Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Gregory^;. Huculak, 28, of 
Lindenhurst, on Dec. 22 at 10:17 p.m. 
traveling east bound on Grand Av- 
enue at Munn Road in a green 1993 
Chevrolet pickup truck. He was 
charged with improper iarie use, dri- i 
ving under the influence of alcohol, 
and driving under the influence of al- 
cohol perse. He accepted the offer to 
take a Breathalyzer test (0.24). 

Huculak was" released on bond 
pending a court date of Jan. 12 at 9 
a.m. in Waukegan. 



Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Kurt A. ' Larson, 33, of 
Wadsworth, on'Saturday, Dec.^ at 
3:50 p.m. traveling south bound on 
Route 45 north of Sand Lake Road in 
a blue and brown 1988 Pontiac. 
He was charged with improper lane 
use, illegal transportation of alcohol, 
operating an uninsured vehicle, and 
driving with a revoked license. Lar- 
son was released on bond pending a 
court date of Feb. 3 at 10:30 a.m. in 
Grayslake. 

Charged with Dili 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Brian S. Hallin, 31, of Lin- 
denhurst,. on Dec. 24 at 5:49 p.m.' 
traveling west bound on Grand Av- 
enue west of Crabtree Court in a 
white 1997 Dodge pickup truck. " : 

He was charged with speeding, 
driving under the influence of alco- 
hol, and driving under the influence 
of alcohol greater than the 0.08 limit 

He took a breathalyzer test and 
registered 0.14. Hallin was released 
on bond pending a court date of Jan. 
19 at 9 a.m! in Waukegan. 

LAKE VILLA 

Accident injures three 

Three people sustained injuries 
in a two-car Collision at the intersec- 
tion of Fairfield and Monaville Road 
Dec. 23. 

■ At about 4:05 p.m. that day, 
Suzanne M. Tellef, 20, of Schamburg 
was driving southbound on Fairfield 
approaching the intersection of 
Monaville. According to reports, she 
did not see the 4-way stop sign and 
• >- entered the intersection, hitting a car 
' driven by Donald R.^Hefdermariri, 
44, 2024 Countryside Lane, Round 
Lake Beach." 

Lake Villa Rescue,- Lake Villa Po- 
lice and Round Lake B each police re- 
sponded to the scene. 

Tellef was transported via Lake 
■ Villa Rescue to St. Therese Medical 
Center where she was treated for in- 
juries and released. A passenger in 
her car, Ronald E. Tellef, 57, of 
Schamberg, was also taken to St. 
Therese where he was treated for in- 
juries. . 

. Heidermann was taken to Con- 
dell Medical Center, where he was 
treated. 

Tellef was ticketed for disobey- 
ing a stop sign. Heidermann was cit- 
ed for no proof of insurance. 




. V 



Woman injured 

A woman was injured when 
her car collided with another vehi- 
cle and then crashed into a traffic 
signal at the intersection of Grand 
Avenue andDeep Lake Road on 
Dec. 24. 

About 10:38 ,.a.m., Beeda M. 
Druse, 76) of Lake Villa was traveling 
eastbound on Route 132'(Grand Av- 
enue) west of Deep Lake Road, trav- 
eling in the left lane. She reportedly 
. quickly changes lanes to avoid a car 
.that was turning northbound onto 
Deep Lake Road from Grand Av- 
enue. Heir car then struck the left 
front bumper of the car in the right- 
hand lane, causing her to lose con- 
trol of the car, veer off the road and 
strike a traffic light post, eventually 
coming to a rest in a 6-foot ditch in 
, the southwest comer of the intersec- 
tion. of Deep Lake Road and Route 
132. 

Druse was taken to Condell 
Medical Center by Lake Villa Rescue 
where she was treated for injuries. 
The driver of the other car, Jesus M. 
Rios, 20, of Lake Villa, was treated at 
the scene. .'"- 

Druse was ticketed for failure to 
signal. Rios was cited for driving on 
an expired driver's license (less than 
six months)! 









Welcome, Santa 

Residents of the Friendship Home of Central Baptist Children's Home in Lake Villa made sure that 
Santa Knows exactly where to go Christmas Eve. — Photo by Sandy Bressrier 




Dlansfor 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Developers of Landmark Pointe 
have notified village officials that - 
they desire to submit a revised de-; 
velopment plan for consideration by 
the Combined Plan Commission 
and Zoning Board. 

"They're hoping to file the first 
part of January for the regular hear- 



ing on Feb. 11," said Robert Silhan, 
village director of planning, zoning, 
and building. 

The Combined Plan Commis- 
sion and Zoning Board meets in the 
Tod Maplethorpe Room of the Com- 
munity Building, 884 Main Street 

A previous, proposal for Land- 
mark Pointe was recommended for 
denial by the plan board. 

Silhan told village trustees on 



Dec 21 at the.village council meeting 
that the developer is expected to re- 
turn with a request for an R-l 
Planned Unit Development with a 
significantly reduced number of lots. 
^Landmark Pointe originally was 
proposed for 26-acres on the east 
shore of Antioch Lake as an R-l 
Planned United Development The 
last proposal was for 43 lots with an 
average size lot of 17,110 square feet 



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A6 /Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 1, 1999 



Antioch Upper Grade School announces honors 



The students of the An tioch Up- 
per Grade School have been named 
to the honor roll for the first quarter. 
They are: 
Grade 6 
'A' Honors 

Alyssa Anderson, Elizabeth Bur- 
dellk, Trevor Cerney, Ryan Church, 
Leslie Collins, Gina Florian, Ashley 
Fries, Ryan Gorski, Kimberly 
Gustafson, Lindsay Keefe, Lindsey 
Kelly, Julieanne Krlens, Elyce Ma- 
lindzak, Abigail Misic, ZacharyMlt- 
suuchi, Melissa Mullan, Andrew 
Newton, Ashley Ovaska, Megan 
Placko, Melinda Renschen, Loren 
Scarbrough, Peter Scheldt, Klaudia 
Siczek, Eric Stahl, Jakub Stoj 
High Honors 

Peter Brandt, Tracy 
Brannstrom, Alyssa Casey, Katie 
Collins, Jody Crivello, Ryan Davis 
Mark Decker, Christine Dee, Saman- 
tha Demerit t, Laura Gegg, Sharissa 
Hanson, Philip Herout, Kirsten Hill, 
Kathryn Hofeldt, Nathaniel Hughes, 
Derek Johnson, Rachel Kerner, 
Robert Klean, Christine Korkowski, 
Josy Koutsoures. 

Lianna Koreker, Jaclyn Ku- 
lakowski, Stefanie Leafblad, Christo- 
pher Leffelman, Ryan Leng, Jitlian 
Lindom, Lisa Long, Melissa Lulofs, 
Melissa Markus, Kelly McHugh, Eric 
Nordby, Mary O'Connor, Timothy 
Racette, Samantha Riley, Anna 
Rindahl, Hillary Vite, Leslie White, 
s Ellen Wright 
Honors 

Christin Accomando, Paul Ap- 
plegren, Jacob August, John Barlow, 
Robert Bird, Katrina Brooke, Justin 
Brussaly, Aaron Campbell, Alicia 
Chess, Grant Comstock, Jennifer 
Finch, Rachel Finkelberg, Jane! Gier- 



notli, Amanda Maverick, Kara 
Heggen, Nicholas Jefferson. 

Elayna Krause, Christopher 
Morgan, Robert Murrin, Steven 
Prebel, Crecencio Rivas, Jennifer 
Roberts, Ashley Rzysko, Jacklyn 
Sedar, Ashley Siwula, Jordan Taylor, 
Megan Tkacy, Jessica Turner, Kara 
Weise, Tiffany Young 
Merit Honors 

Stephanie Brinker, Melissa 
Cole, Kathryn-Ann Eaton, Richard 
Faust, Nicholas Flavin, Scott George- 
son, Arlington Gowlcr, Christopher 
Grindley, Taylor Hart, Derek Hart- 
mann, Eric Kosowski, Amanda Koss, 
Jacob Kwilosz, Bradley Llndstrom, 
Justin Maciuk, Nicholas' Mas- 
trodonato, Jordan Nowak, Anthony 
Palumbo, Mcaghan Payne, Michael 
Poddo, Sean Ranaldo, Evelyn Rasdr, 
Annie Satterfield, Cori Sisler, Brian 
Sternberg, Casondra Stumne, Kelly 
Teevin, David Thompkins, Patricia 
Ultsch, Amelia Vinzant, Michael VI- 
tucci, Alicia Wade, Steven Werchek 

Grade 7 
'A' Honors 

Cara Anderson, Emily Astroski, 
Marta Baginski, Daniel Basler, James 
Beatty, Phillip Bednar, Thomas 
Callanan, David Church, David Dee, 
Claire Earl], Samantha Edwards, Jar- 
rod Fiedler, Wendy Finley, Rachel 
Foresta, Stephanie Guido, Jordan 
Houtz, Jeff Inciardi, Kyle Ketterling. 

Elizabeth Martin, Matthew Mc- 
clain, Samantha Miller, Gregory 
Mitchell, Patricia Moore, Andrew 
Napier, Danielle O'Young, lindsey 
Ottinger, Kyle Schneider, Erin 
Schwaba, Jamie Tucker, Rebecca 
Tucker, Cassandra Turzy, Michael 
Waters, Anders Wennstrom 



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H 


rt 



High Honors 

Matthew Anderson, Lauren 
Baba, Meaghan Bartz, Andrew Bed- 
nar, LeighAnn Blank, Lauren Boarini, 
Tyler Bolton, Jeffrey Bousson, Jessica 
Coombs, Katrina Cox, Andrew Curto, 
Melanie D'Arco, Rachel DeBoer, Jen- 
nifer Dewar, Jessi Enright, Katherine 
Fries, Kimberly Gabor, Joe Grimm, 
Charlie Haley, Bonnie Henning Kyle 
Johnson, Richard Klean, James Ku- 
bisiak, Kris tina Leng. 

Patrick Lepper, Sarah Lewis, 
Timothy Lorenzini, Jacquelyn. 
Magiera, Christopher Memmen, 
Nathan Moore, Robert Perrone, 
Christina Pon'tikes, Michelle Ranal- 
do, Michelle Rodgers, Jason Rogalln, 
Gary Romano Jr., Halley Ross, Katie 
Savino, Brynn Schwaba, Christine 
Shea, Ryan Skorze wski, Daniel Stack- 
nik, Suzanne Stelniasek, Sabrina 
Stone, Denice Thompkins, Michael 
Tlddens, Manias Valeika, Daniel 
' Vladlc, Kyle White, Jordan Ziemba 
Honors 

Andrew Barnstable, Allison Bei- 
necke, Amber Campbell, Janerie Cer- 
mak, Julia Cermak, Daniel Cichon, 
Jeffrey Davis, Nicholas Fullerton, 
Jamie Huebner, Nicholas Infant!, 
Jamie Khawaja, Lori Knupp, Eric 
Lear, Heather Norin, Christina 
Poland, Jacquelyn Rindahl, Dan 
Rohrmayer, Jessica Smouse, Andrew 
Turner, Kelly Warner 
Merit Honors 

David Aim, Kathryne Baird, 
Nicholas Bregenzer, Kristy Burgess, 
Jeff Canella, Thomas . Coffman, 
Patrick Cratty, Joseph Dziki, Brandon 
Foren, William Gillen, Patrick Gog- 
gin, Julie Gordon, Joseph Haley, Sam 
Hayden, Jennifer Hoffman, Rhian- 
non Hull, EUora Jares, Taryn Kloster. 



Patrick Korellis, Amanda Lan- 
ning, Timothy Lazzara, Michael 
Long, Kyle Maday, Ryan McCann, 
Patrick Naegele, Ashley Parker, Jlmit 
Patel, Candace Pierce, Tom Rompel- 
la, Matthew Rynklewicz, Venus Si- 
mons, Kyle Stigler, David Tranter, 
Hollie Wiatr, Megan Worrell 

Grade 8 
'A' Honors 

Jeni Blake, Emily Bock, Shanna 
Casey, Adam David, Sabrina Dole, 
Darren Goodwiler, Karly Gulden, 
Marie Heffeman, Kelly Kampendahl, 
Krlsten Karla, Ciarra Kent, Kristen 
Kessell, Adam Kessler, Tracy Knuth, 
Kimberly Lavelie, Elaine Lencioni. 

Michelle Lenczuk, Eric Uvasy, 
Matthew Markus, Kara Mastrodona- 
to, Amy Matheson, Ruth McAlonan, 
Kaitlyn McDonald, Robyn Morten- 
son, Benjamin Newton, Erin Nobler, 
Krystle Nowakowski, Michael Perry, 
. Lauren Popp, Amanda Rzysko, Jere- 
my Schoenhoft, Joseph Severino, 
Brooke Soutgate 
High Honors 

Diana Agullar, Heather Axton, 
Christopher Becker, MegariBeemer, 
Bryan Bishop, Nicole Blackwood, 
Kimberly Blough, Amanda Bon- 
hivert, Laura Bookwalter,, Garrett 
Brannstrom, Melissa Conner, 
Camille Crandall, Ryan Cybul, 
Michael Decker, Lynn Freeman, 
Courtney Garrett, Lindsay Garrett, 
Sean Gaynor. 

Jordan Hauser, Gregory HUgen- 
berg, Kari Hintz, Christopher Jacobs, 
Ryan Jordan, Lisa Korkowski, 
Stephanie Leonard, . Breann 



Melerdirk, Michael Menzer, Amber 
Misic, Angela Mulcahy, Ashley My- 
ers, Elizabeth Nobler, Heather 
Prebel, Shannon Propeck 
Honors 

Ken Barth, Paige Bolin, Kyle 
Bulava, James Cederquist, Ryan Gay- 
Ior, Jeffrey Giannoni, Anthony 
Gorzelnik Jr., Chris Keres, Rami 
Khawaja, David; Krakora, Joseph 
Lorenzini, Margaret Ludwig, Patrick 
McConneU, Patrick Minter, Kimberly 
Nord, Joshua Paddock, Melissa Pergl. 

Michael Persman, Joseph Perzl- " 
gian, Ryan Pilcher, Tracy Porch, 
Evon Potocki, Melissa Raymond, Ja- 
cob Ring, Thomas Sbalchiero, Kirie 
Sergot, Shannon Stewart, 'Meagan 
Tousignant, Nicole Wallace, Liza 
Zacher, Ted Zalewski, Barry Zeman 
Merit Honors. 

Angela Anderson, Michael 
Becker, Mark Belanger, Ryan Bell, 
Emily Brandt, Nathan Brinker, Jarrett 
Cable, Roger Cheverette, Patrick 
Crow, Brian Floore, Maryla Fursaye- 
va, Glendon Gaines, Oksana Hawry- 
luk, Daniel Held, Amy Hession, Jen- 
nifer Holtqulst, Brad Irving, Takiah 
Jones, Matthew Jorgensen, Ronald 
Kelley, Kenneth Korczyk, Katherine 
Latham. 

Adam Lehn, Amanda Levine, 
Rachel Markovich', Justin Marsceau, 
Eric Masters, Cori McCarville, 
Danielle Nielsen, Aaron Patin, Jen- 
nifer Pendergrass, Victoria Powell, 
Rachel Reichert, Sara Rico, Brittany 
Sorensen, .Stephanie Spurgeon, 
Joseph Svoboda, Anne TrovUlion, 
Tiffany Turner, OlDell Wholaver, 
Amanda Zemanek . 




Tollway to hold public meeting 

itvwillc 



TAVERN & GRILLE ^JW 





REE FOOD BUFFET 

PARTY FAVORS 

MIDN16HT 
CHAMPAGNE TOAST 




The Tollway Authority will con 
duct an oper\, hovJse,.and public 
meeting Jan. "7, to discuss alterna- 
tives to the current planned exit 
ramp leading from the Edens Spur to 
Deerfield Road. 

The meeting's format will allow 
for public viewing of the alternatives 
and the opportunity to comment 
and ask questions. The first phase of 
the meeting will be held in an open 
house type setting from 4 to 6:30 
p.m. During this phase, Tollway Au- 
thority staff will be available to an- 
swer questions. At 7:30 p.m. a public 
hearing will be held to present the al- 
ternatives and allow for formal pub- 
lic Input and comments. The meet- 



ing is scheduled to take place at the 
Deerfield Hyatt Hotel, 1750 L&e- 
CookRoadi'De'erilela"? **« noullssn 

Based upon concerns from local 
residents, construction on this por- 
tion of the Deerfield Toll Plaza Pro- 
ject was suspended in October. 

"Residents of Deerfield, and 
their elected officials, have asked us 
to review this matter, and this meet- 
ing will describe the different alter- 
natives available. We look forward to 
hearing their views," said Executive 
Director Ralph Wehner. 

Comments from those unable to 
attend can be sent to the Tollway Au- 
thority offices at 2700 Ogden Ave., 
Downers Grove, IL 60515. 



38730 Deep Lake Rd. 

Lake Villa 

356-3701 



Historical Society to close two months 



Lakes Region Historical Society 
Museum will close for the months of 
January and February, 1999. 

The Museum will re-open on 
Saturday, March 6, 1999 at 11 a.m. It 
will be open every Saturday from 11 
a.m. to 3 p.m. for the rest of the year. 



-During the time the museum 
building is closed, individual tours 
may be arranged when possible. 
Arrangement for tours and further 
information is available from Society 
President Robert Lindblad, 847-395- 
0899. 




' 




THE 
CUPBOARD 

LeeFilas 



Bulldogs win 
first 'Lakeland 
Shootout' 

As our tails got whipped 
from jump shot to jump 
shot, a never ending 
flurry of balls swishing 
through the net, you just have to 
look on in stunned silence after a 
while. 

Because on Dec. 18, at 5 p.m. 
Lakeland Sports Editor Brendan 
O'Neill and I just stood in awe of 
Grant High School's two superb 
shooters, juniors Teri LaRoche 
and Wayne Bosworth. 

This whole weird game'start- 
ed with some talk in the office, A 
"what if.." talk that got out of 
hand. 

"What if We got (Grayslake's) 
Jenny Wessel and (Warren's) 
Becky Moo on the court at the 
same time," I said, throwing 
"What If s.." around like they 
were popcorn In a movie theater. 

"What if we got Bosworth and 
(Warren's) Jourdain Milot to play 
with them?" was O'Neill's answer. 

Like thunder rolling across the 
sky, the idea clamored around un- 
til, after an early morning depart- 
mental meeting, I heard from 
O'Neill's mouth, "Why don't WE 
play a boy and a girl from each - 
school in basketball?" 

So, here I stand, turning red, as ' 
another Bosworth three-pointer . 
" sails through the net Another letter 
added to the spelling of "B-U-L-L- 
D-O-G-S" for my team. 

I let fly another brick of a shot, 
that clangs the rim before dropping 
neatly on the ground next to the T ^ 
rest of the bricks I tossed up that 
day, seconds before Frank Cittadl- 
no, athletic director at Grant High 
School and referee of this game of 
makeshift "HORSE", yells out the - 
letter I'D" with a smirk on his face. 

With the score "B-U-L-L-D" to 
"B..", I was a tiit nervous, but I 
knew my ace in the hole, "Basket- 
ball Jones" Brendan O'Neill himself 
would come through to save us 
from a humiliation worse than 
death. 

I could tell by the way his bricks 
flew into the air, he was following 
LaRoche and he was getting ready 
to start burying her—with bricks. 

As she made another three- 
pointer, her fifth or sixth in a row,' 
O'Neill's face turned clouded He 
stood up to the three-point line, 
fired an arching shot and planted 
another brick next to mine. 




w. 




e ended up losing both 
games of "BULLDOG" to the Grant 
sharpshooters in humiliating fash- 
Ion as the entire boys varsity 
watched and laughed at our inept- 
ness. 

Bosworth and LaRoche hit a 
dizzying array of three-pointers, 
jump shots, lay-ups and hook shots. 

This was just the first "Lakeland 
Shootout," and we plan to chal- 
lenge each of the schools in our 
area to a modified game of 
/'HORSE," Penciled in on our 
schedule are Libertyville, Carmel, 
Antioch, Grayslake and Round 
Lake for the near future. 

Watch out area varsity basket- 
ball teams. We're improving with 
each day. We may be 0-lnow, but 
when we show up at your gym 
ready to challenge your'best play- 
ers, gather 'round, because you just 
might see Lakeland's sports de- 
partment out-shoot your best 
shooters....Or at least not lose so 
badly; 

LeeFilas can be reached at (847) 
223-8161; fax (847) 223-8810; ore- 
mail at edit@ltuCcom. 




January 1, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 't 





By LEEFILAS 
taff Reporter 



The play of forward Justine 
Sinkus and guard Amie Carlberg 
was just enough to push the Anti- 
och Sequoits (5-9) over the hump 
and into fourth place out of eight ' 
teams at the McHenry Christmas 
Tournament held Dec. 21-26; 

Inthe opening game, Rock- 
ford Guilford gave Antioch a 
scare, before Antioch could take 
over the game down the stretch 
by a final score of 35-31. 

Carlberg led all scorers in the 
tight contest with 10 points, while 
freshman center Erica Brown 
posted up for eight points under 
the boards. 

Then, the next day, Antioch 
faced a tough Fenger team and 
fell by a final score of 42-32; 

Fenger,- which played quick 
aggressive defense against Anti- 
och, took the lead early on and 
never let go In the win. 

Carlberg was the only player 
In double figures for. Antioch, 
scoring 12 points on the 
evening. 

Against McHenry on the 23rd, 
Antioch pulled the upset of the 
tournament, beating the host 
team by a final of 44-34 behind 
Sinkus' 10 points, nine rebounds 
and aggressive defense down the 
stretch; ';' 

The game was close through- 
out, with neither Antioch or 
McHenry getting ahead by more 
than'2 in the first half.- , 

The game remained close in 
the third, with Antioch on top at 
the end of three by a score of 26- 
25, but then exploded 18 points in 
the final period, behind a key 
three * point shot by Bethany 
Shore, to ignite the rout. 

Carlberg added eight points 
on the night, and Sinkus, as a re- 
sult of her aggressive play,' fouled 
out halfway through the fourth. 

In, the fourth place consola- 
tion game, Antioch faced a 
Streamwood team that routed the 
Sequoits by 30 points earlier in 
the season. '. 

But rather than getting 
trounced, .the Sequoits fought 
hard in a 45-34 losing battle that 
showed Antioch's improvement 
over one month. 

Leading the charge for Anti- 




Antioch senior Amie Carlberg drives the baseline as Stevenson defenders close in during the Se- 
quoits recent game against the Patriots.— Photo by Steve Young 



.V 



och was Sinkus with 12 points 
and 11 rebounds, while Katie 
Gofron scored 10 and Carlberg 
had seven.; ' '"' V 

After tHe game, -Sinkus was 
named to the all tournament 



team for Antioch. 

Antioch will move on to face 
Round Lake in Round Lake on 
Jan. 7 and will face Lake Forest at 
home on Jan. 9. 

The game against Round Lake 



will be a tough test for Antioch, as 
the Panthers are sporting an eight 
game winning streak, won the 
Woodstock Christmas Tourna- 
ment over the holiday and cur- 
rently possess a 12-4 record. 




Antioch boys start 
slow, score big in 
fourth quarter of 



wins 

By LEEFILAS 
Staff Reporter 



Rolling off to a good start is im- 



portant while playing any holiday 
tournament in high school basket- 
ball. 

The Antioch boys basketball 
team is using that philosophy, 
rolling out to a 2-0 start in the first 
day of the Rockford Tournament, 
by up-ending Rockford Auburn by 
a score of 51-31 in the morning 
game, then later defeating Rockford 
Harlem by a score of 54-49. 

Irr the opening game, junior 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



Name; Don Lackey 
School: Antioch 
Sport: Basketball 
Yean Junior 
Last week's stats: 
Scored 17 points in Se- 
quoits win over Rock- 
ford Auburn, added sev- 
en points in win over 
.Harlem last week. 




Lackey 



Name: Justine Sinkus 
School: Antioch 
Sport: Basketball 
Yean Sophomore 
Last week's stats: 
Scored 10- points and 
grabbed nine rebounds 
in Sequoits 44-34 win 
oyer McHenry last week. 



forward Don Lackey and sopho- 
more guard Eric White each scored 
17 points to lead Antioch to the 20- 
point rout, while senior center Matt 
Koss knocked in eight points. ' 
. The first quarter was a display 
in defense for both teams, as Anti- 
och only scored four points to 
Auburn's five, but Lackey and 
White started hitting their jumpers, 
scoring 15 points in the second to 
take a 19- 10 lead at the half. 

Antioch scored 32 the rest of 
the way, while holding Auburn to 
21 to seal the victory. 

In the night game, White was 
hitting from all over the court, post- 
ing 15 points and three three-point- 
ers, while senior Brian Soldaho 
scored 14 and sophomore Adam 
Durham scored 13 to lead Antioch 
to victory. 

Antioch was down by three at 
the start of the third quarter, before 
coming alive and taking the lead at 
the end of the third. 



In the fourth, a stretch run led 
by White and Lackey, who scored 
seven on the night, sealed the 54-49 
come from behind victory for Anti- 
och, 

Antioch will move on to play 
Rockford East and Rockford Guil- 
ford in the second day of the 12 
team tournament, with three wins 
over, the next two day, Antioch 
could be in the running for a tro- 
phy, which would be a big boost for. 
the 5-5 Sequoits. 

After the tournament, Antioch 
.will have a short break before host- 
ing the struggling Round Lake Pan- 
thers Jan. 5 before traveling to Lake 
Forest Jan. 8. 

Against Round Lake, Antioch 
will look to stop the offense Albert 
Lozano, who has been on a tear of 
late, averaging over 12 points per 
game over the last five games. Anti- 
och will also have to contend with 
Derek Williams, tfie Panthers 6-5, 
300-pound center. 



A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



January 1,1999 



LAKELAND LEADERS 



Name 

Ryan Schreen, LHS 
Jourdain Milot, VvTHS 
Wayne Bosworth, GHS 
Doug Rippberger, MHS 
Mike Brandow? WTHS. 
Nick Leider, CHS 
Don Lackey, ACHS . 
Brett Serva, MHS 
Chris Paddock, WHS 
Mike Kolar, WTHS 



Boys 



G 


Pts 


10 


174 


5 


87 


8 


138 


13 


209 


7 


109 


10 


141 


7 


98 


13 


169 


7 


81 


8 


91 



Avg 

17.4 

17.4 

17.3 

16.1 

15.6 

14.1 

14.0 

13.0 

11.6 

11.4 



may not include all games 



Wilmot Mountain opens despite warn weather 



Despite record high tempera- 
tures in recent weeks, Wilmot 
Mountain has been making snow 
since the arrival of an Arctic cold front 
and will begin its 1998-99 season, 

Steve Schwarzbach, Wilmot 
Mountain's new president, conced- 
ed the past few weeks have been 
frustrating but, now that his snow- 
making crew has been able to crank 
up Wilmot Mountain's, arsenal of 
more than 100 snowguns, he's feel- 
ing a lot better. 



"Last year and the year before 
that, Wilmot Mountain opened for 
skiing in mid-November," 
Schwarzbach said, "Longtime skiers 
and employees say they don't ever 
remember a warm spell continuing 
this far into December. But, if the 
weather forecasters are right, have 
returned to a more normal seasonal 
weather pattern and that means we 
will be making snow day and night 
from now on." 
' Schwarzbach said he hopes to 



have three or four runs open this* 
weekend and all of Wilmot 
Mountain's two dozen runs blan- 
keted with a solid base of snow and 
open for skiing before Christmas.' 

Located 70 miles north of 
downtown Chicago on the Illinois- 
Wisconsin state line west of 
Antioch, Wilmot Tvlountaln Is the 
largest and most popular day ski 
area serving skiers and snowboard- 
ers in the Chicago and Milwaukee 
metropolitan areas. 



FROM PAGE Al 



***>*. > 



—i*r-' 



AFFILIATION: Area conferences feature four feasible plans; two look likely 



Right now, the NSC is made up 
of eight teams,, ranging from a 
school enrollment of roughly 3,300 
(Stevenson High School) to 800 
(North Chicago High School). 

The biggest school in the confer- 
ence, Stevenson, is considered the 
powerhouse of the conference, and 
is continuing to grow. 

Second in the conference in size 
is Warren, at roughly 2,550, with 
Libertyville (2,500), Ziqn-Benton 
(2,035), Antioch (1900), Mundelein 
(1,580), Lake Forest (1,399) ..and 
North Chicago bringing up the rear. 

However, the rangr of students 
is expected to charge drastically 
over the next five years. 

Within three years, the third 
largest school in the conference, 
Libertyville High School, will be 
splitting in two. 

"We expect to have two com- 
pletely separate schools by the 
2000-2001 school year," said Linda 
Tabers-Kwak, spokesperson for 
Libertyville High School. -"By 2002, 
the schools enrollment should even 
out and both schools will be inde- 
pendent of each other." 
"^"—On trre rieelsTof ElbertyvilJe'spIir- 
tihg into two separate four- year 
campuses, Warren, which already 
operates two separate campuses in 
Gumee, may officially become two, 
independent, four-year facilities.- 

Warren's O'Plaine and Almond 
campuses, together, enroll roughly 
2,500 students. They are indepen- 
dent of each other except for extra 
curricular activities, including ath- 
letics. 

It has been said in small circles 




Wishing you a delightful holiday 

season and a new year that is filled 

with much hope, joy, 

and happiness. 

If you are traveling to visit family 

and friends to celebrate the 

holidays, please remember to slow 

down and to drive safely. 

Your life, and the lives of others. 

may depend on it. 

Timothy H. Osmond, OC 

Osmond Imunace Sendee ltd. 

976 Hillside 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 



395-2500 



v. Depend on your 
hometown professionals 




I'tKIN./. 



that when Libertyville splits, Warren Antioch Community High School, 
may officially break Into two sepa- with a current enrollment of rough- 
rate facilities, ly 1,900,. should see a 600,-student 
"With schools like Libertyville enrollment increase by trie 2004- 
down-sizing to between 1,000 and 2005 school year. 
1,500 students, both of Warren's In addition, the school district is 
schools will be able to fall into this working toward the purchase of 
category— making the split of the land at the; comer of Deep Lake and 
NSC into a "big" division and a Grass Lake. Road to be used as the 
"small" division much more likely. , site of a second Antioch Community 



The one thing 
.that may stop 
Warren from offV 
daily splitting is 
"The University 
of Stevenson", as 
many schools 
have dubbed the 
extra-large 
school. 

However,' 
with the confer-, 
ence splitting 
into two separate 



'Our academic and sports 

achievements for kids are 

sufferingfrom hot being in 

a conference. It's a tough 

spot to he in. We need to 

find a conference' 

Frank Cittadino 
Athletic Director, 
Grant High School "' . 



divisions, this 

could be Warren's chance to break 



High School 
cam p u s . 
Rum o r s 
abound-about 
whether that 
second campus 
would be a sec- 
ond, four-year 
high school, or 
would merely 
be a facility to 
house. the 
freshman and 
sophomore 
classes. 
With the likelihood of current 



out from under Stevenson's big high schools splitting, now would be 



shadow. 

Though Warren has not had any 
official "split" talksas_of yet, the par-;, 
en ts !>f children ' r at Warren^xbiiid ' 
start to call for the split on order to 



prime time for the eight-team NSC 
to look at the future of their confer- 
ence," and where the ^expansion 
. chips may'fail'in the future, which 
'Tim Albers, athletic director for. 



give more students a chance to par- Libertyville High School said will be 
ticipate in athletic and scholastic discussed, 
events. '"No onewants nine teams in the 

In the past, Warren has avoided North Suburban Conference," said 
this pressure by citing the "split Albers, "The superintendents are 
would weaken Warren's programs talking about it (possibly adding 
against the strong Stevenson pro- teams) right now. We should have a 
grams. If the NSC were to split into ' plan by February." 

The plan mapped out would be a 
14-team. North Suburban. 
Conference, with the addition of the 
independents and the eventual con- 
dition of Libertyville, Warren and 
Antioch splitting within the next five 
years. 

The 14 teams in the conference 
could be separated into two sepa- 
rate divisions, with each school of 
similar size, offering similar pro- 
grams and of a relatively close prox- 
imity to the others. 

In Division A, the schools would 
be Stevenson (3280), Zion-Benton 
(2035), Round Lake (1390), 
Mundelein (1587), Lake Forest 



two divisions, it would make 
Warren's split all the more likely. 

Thirdly, Antioch is growing larg- 
er than the small town once antici- 
pated and people are expecting 
Antioch to become two separate 
programs within eight years, which 
would mean Antioch will be in the 
same boat as Libertyville. 

Growth studies show that 

OIL CHANGE) 



5 Qts. of 
Oil Filter 



I 




(1400), Libertyville North (roughly 
1300 after split), and Antioch West 
(expected 1200). 

Division B would be for the 
smaller schools in the division. They 
would be Warren O'Plaine (roughly 
1300), Warren Almond , (roughly 
1250), Antioch East (expected 1200), 
Libertyville South (roughly 1200 
after split), Grant (985), Wauconda 
(855) and North Chicago (805). 

The divisions could be reviewed 
every 3-5 years and adjusted to have 
similar programs and enrollment in 
the same divisions. 

However, if the NSC decided not 
to absorb the independents into the 
conference, with Libertyville and 
Antioch likely splitting into two, 
there could be a push for a split into 
two five-team divisions, or the new 
high schools may be forced to leave 
the NSC. 

The reason for the split could be 
as simple as parity— Antioch and 
Libertyville would not be able to 
compete with a school the size of 
Stevenson immediately after the 
split. But in the long run with more 
growth In.the area, the level of com- 
petition could even out. But all this 
hinges on what comes out of the 
meetings between the athletic 
directors and school officials 
involved. 

"I feel bad for the independents 
out there," Albers said. "Right now, 
there's a bunch of ADs talking, but 
we haven't heard anything yet." 

However, a meeting with the 
athletic directors of the NSC is 
expected in January, and the inde- 
pendents are hoping the talks will 
Include their future as well; 

"There have been no formal 
talks with the North Suburban, but 
with their expansion, there might be 
some room for more schools," said 
Jim Prorok, Athletic Director of 
Round Lake High School. "We're 
waiting for the NSC to get their 
ducks in a row, but we're ready to 
jump up and listen right now." 

Fox Valley Expansion 

What Libertyville will be facing 
in the next three years is what 



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Crystal Lake in the Fox Valley 
Conference faced roughly 15 years 
ago, 

As Crystal Lake became larger, 
voters approved a referendum that . 
created a second high school in 
Crystal Lake. The effects of the split 
to Crystal Lake is still being felt 
today. 

Before the second school, 
Crystal Lake was the largest school 
in the conference and was easily the 
powerhouse of the FVC. Now, with 
Crystal Lake Central and Crystal 
Lake South as two separate four- 
year campuses, they are 8th and 9th 
in the conference In size as South, 
the larger of the two schools, boasts 
a 1,319 enrollment while Central has 
an enrollment of just under 1,100. 

This year, it seems, more talk 
has been thrown around about the 
possible expansion of the FVC than 
ever before. 

"We have been approached by 
the independent schools seeking 
entry into the Fox Valley 
Conference," said Bob Miller, FVC 
president of athletics and athletic 
director from .Lake Zurich (High 
School. "It has been a topic of discus- 
sion from the athletic directors in the 
conference. There's a lot of work yet 
to be done on the idea. We need to 
survey they idea and examine it 
before any decisions are made." 

The talks involving , the Fox 
Valley Conference are rumored to. 
include the independents, and also 
Johnsburg High School. Johnsburg, 
currently a part of the Big Northern 
Red Division, is rumored to be 
' unhappy about . their conference 
affiliation — especially the long dis- 
tance drives to compete against 
conference opponents, Johnsburg 
. would join the three independent 
schools and become a part of the 
FVC, creating a huge, 14-team con- 
ference that could easily be split up 
into' two divisions: a small school 
division (Blue) and a large school 
division (Gray). 

Lakeland's proposed divisions 
have the FVC's Blue Division includ- 
ing Grayslake, with an enrollment of 
1,400, Round Lake (1,388), Crystal 
Lake Central (1,100), Prairie Ridge 
(1,062), Grant (985), Wauconda 
(855) and Johnsburg (758). 

In the Fox Valley Gray Division, 
would be McHenry (1,968), Jacobs 
(1,936), Dundee-Crown U,646), 
Lake Zurich (1,442), Cary-Grove 
(1,404), Woodstock (1,348), and 
Crystal Lake South (1,319). 

The expansion of the FVC would 
be helpful to the smaller schools 
and the larger schools— providing 
more parity and a higher, level of 
competition that many feel the FVC 
lacks in its current form. 

On the surface, these two plans 
look to be the most plausible and* 
likely solutions the problems facing 
the independents schools In Lake 
County, but. two other possibilities 
also exist. One involves the creation 
of a mega-conference, the other has 
the independent schools joining a 
conference in Wisconsin, 

Regardless of the outcome, the 
next few weeks will tell the tale of 
Lake County's independent schools, 
and in some way, the NSC and FVC 
will be involved In reshaping the 
make-up of area conferences. 



)9 



January 1,1999 



SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A9 



at 

ra- 
id 

of 

m 

of 
ie 

ki 
el- 
se 






Sequoits bowlers finish 
first half .500 in NSC 



Varsity 

The team is back at practice after 
a week off for a holiday. The break 
comes at the half-way point in the 
season for the Sequoits. While the 
win-loss record is not what they 
hoped for the team has achieved 
many personal goals and has shown 
a great deal of improvement. 

The Sequoits ended the first half 
with a dual match record of 4-5 and 
3-3 in the NSC. Antioch could easily 
be 6-2 and 5-1. A30 pin loss to Grant 
in a non-conference match and two 
tough conference losses, Warren 55. 
pins and Libertyville'47 pins have 
shown the Sequoits they can be 
competitive with the better teams. 
This years team has pushed their av- 
erage near 800, an improvement of 
25 pins. They have bowled several 
games over 900 arid have a team high 
series of 2,692. . 

Individually the girls have 
achieved improvements "of.1.1 to 40 
pins. Shiela Girtcn leads the team 
with a 167 average and a high game 
of 247, Both Sheila and Colleen 
Bradek (160 average) have high se- 
ries In the 580s. Other varsity mem- 
bers Stefanic . Forests, Amanda 
Phelps, and Robin Walczak all have 



averages of 159 and high games over 
200. The team hopes to continue 
to improve and build towards a 
strong showing at the NSC Tour- 
nament and sectionals at the end 
of January. 

Junior Varsity 

The JV Sequoits are having an- 
other successful year. The sequoits 
ended the First half with an exciting 8 
pin. victory over Libertyville to give 
the team a 5-1 conference record 
and 6-3 overall. The team has an av- 
erage over 700 and has rolled several 
high games scores'iover 800. 

Stacy Parrish and Lindy Gaylor 
lead the squad with averages of 149 
and 146 respectively. Both Stacy with 
a high game of 214 and Lindy have 
seen some time on varsity. Abbey 
Thomas is another member of the 
squad and has improved her average 
by 22 points. Christina Jones 'has 
contributed to the squad with two 
series over 500,, Surprises on this 
years JV team include Amanda 
Cowgill with an improvement of over 
40 pins and a high game of 204, and 
new comer Melissa Hansen who cur- 
reritiy holds an average of 143 and a 
high game of 211. 



YOUTH ICELESS HOCKEY 



Hull Division 








Grades 1-2 








Bruins 


10 1 





20 


Ducks 


9 2 





18 


Flyers 


7 3 


1 


15 


Blues 


6 4 


I 


13 


StarsG 


5 


12 




Blackhawks 


2 8 


1 


5 


Redwings 


2 8 


1 


5 


Penqulns 


11 








Savard Division 






Grades 3-4 








Blackhawks - - 


MO 1 2 


o- 


'20 


Blues 


9 3 





-18 


Penqulns 


8 4 





16 


SlarsS 


4 3 


13 




Redwings 


5 6 


I 


11 


Ducks 


3 8 


1 


7 


Bruins 


3 8 


1 


7 


Flyers 


1 8 


3 


5 


Gretzky Division 






Lightning 


9 3 





18 


Kings 


9 3 





18 


Panthers 


9 3 





18 


Sabres 


9 3 





18 


Canucks 


5 6 


1 


11 


Canadicns 


3 8 


1 


7 


Islanders 


2 9 


1 


5 


Sharks 


12 








Howe Division 


I . 






Grades 5-6 








Flyers 


9 1 


2 


20 


Ducks 


10 2 





20 


Redwings 


9 2 


1 


19 


REHAB INSTITUTE 


OF CHICAGO 




EVENTS 







StarsB 


3 


1 


17 


. 


Penqulns 


7 


5 


. 


14 


Bruins 


3 


8 


1 


7 


Blues 


3 


9 





6 


Blackhawks . 


1 


11 





2 


Orr Division 










Canucks 


9 


2 


1 


19 


Kings 


7 


3 


2 


16 


Canadians 


7 


4 


I 


15 


Islanders 


5 


5 


2 


12 


Sharks 


6 


6 


0- 


12 


Sabres 


3 


9 





6 


Panthers 


1 


8 


3 


5 


Lightning' -<■ "' 


■ i 1 - 


"11 


o • 


r£ 


Norrls Division 








Grades 7-8 










Penqulns 


12 


1 


1 


25 


Redwings 


8 


3 


3 


19 


Blues.. 


5 


4 


5 


15 


Blackhawks 


5 


5 


4 


14 


Stars6 


6 


2 


14 




Flyers 


5 


7 


2 


12 


Ducks 


4 


8 


2 


10 


Bruins 


1 


12 


I 


3 



Cubs Caravan 
returns 

The Chicago Cubs Caravan will 
return to RICs Center for Health and 
Fitness on Wednesday, Jan. 13 from 
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Caravan fea- 
tures current and former Chicago 
Cubs players as well as Cubs man- 
agement. They will be available to 
sign autographs, take pictures and 
talk baseball. Last year the Caravan 
included Mickey Morandini, Kevin 
Foster, Ed Lynch and Billy Williams. 
For more information about the Car- 
avan and which Cubs will be attend- 
Ing this year, call the Sports office at 
{312)908-4292. 

The RIC Wheelchair Cubs, who 
are sponsored by Cubs Care, will also 
staff a booth at the 14th Annual Cubs 
Convention Jan. 15 to 17 at the 
Chicago Hilton and Towers. The 
booth will highlight the accomplish- 
ments of the RIC Wheelchair Cubs 
and the RIC Sports Program. If you 
are interested In attending the Con- 
vention and volunteering at the RIC 
Wheelchair Cubs booth; call Tom 
Richey in the Sports Office. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

LOON LAKES MANAGEMENT . 

ASSOCIATION 

' A special meeting of the Loon 
Lakes Management Association will be 
held on Tuesday. January 12, 1999. 
The time will be 7:30 PM. The meeting 
will be held at the Antioch Township 
Hall, 99 W. Fit. 173, Antioch, IL. Guest 
speakers will be present. . 

1298D-2345-AN 

December 25, 1998 

January 1, 1999 

'Januarys, 1999 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Disc Jockey 

Plus 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 42160 N. 
4th Ave., Antioch, IL 60002. (847)395- 
5040. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
David A. Yaris. Jr., 42160 N. 4th Ave., 
Antioch. IL 60002. (847)395-5040. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) ol 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business is/are correct 
as shown. 

/s/Davld A. Yarls. Jr., December 
14.1998 

The foregoing Instrumeni was ac- 
• knowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 4th day ol December, 1 998. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Robert E, Frank 
Notary Public 
Received: December 21, 1998 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0199A-2349-AN 
January 1, 1999 
January 8, 1999 
January 15, 1999 







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Visit us on the Internet at us-netdirect.com 



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a toll-free call 

Mention CODE 5763C when calling 

http://www.us-netdirect.com 



accept: 




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A1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 1,1999 



M-iA, 



■■■"?■ 



LOCAL DIGEST 



Insurance savings 

Village insurance rates have 
dropped. 

"Our premium's going down 
S46.000," said Village Manager Tim 
Weils. "It's a very good news item." 

"It pays to be careful," said Mayor 
Marilyn Shineflug. 

The decreased insurance rates for 
the village occurred despite about $1 
million more property to insure this 
year than last year, according to Wells. 

Wells said that the village premi- 
um is now $158,000. 

Tax levy up 

The Village of Antioch conducted a 
public hearing on the tax levy Dec 21. 

The tax rate per $100 for village res- 
idents has gonciip because voters ap- 
proved bond sales to build a new fire 
substation and police station. 

Village ManagcrTim Wells estimat- 
ed that the average home in Antioch 
may experience approximately a $7 in- 
crease. Wells said that the rate went up 
less than the cost of living this year. 

The average home in Antioch is 
valued at about $150,000. 

No questions from the public re- 
garding the tax levy ordinance were 
raised at die meeting. 

Redevelopment 

Village trustees voted to make re- 
development payments in the Village 
Tax Increment Financing district at the 
village board meeting Dec. 21. 

Two businesses have requested 
payments. 

The Thrift Shop requested pay- 
ment for work to improve their store- 
front and work on utilities in back of 
the building. 

"Schwinn did roof improve- 
ments," Community Development 
Director Gaude LeMere told trustees 

Finance Committee Chairman 
Wayne Foresta said that the payments 
were part of an Antioch program to r 
help businesses by buying-doivri iri- r 
terest rates five points. 

No skating 

Village officials will not permit 
skating this winter on new ponds in 



Start the 

jfew year 

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I Complcle Adult & Children's Dcnlislry 
I IniiiRinw Plans Honored • Senior Citizens Discount 
) Cosmetic und Restorative Cure 
t Infection Control Monitoring System 
I Dental Lub-Rclinei-Rcjuir» While You Wail 
t Same Day Service • Emergency Care Available 
I Affordably Priced With Payment Plans 
I Nilrous Oxide (Laughing G;ii) 
Convenient Daily & Saturday Appointments 
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the William E. Brook Wetland Sanctu- 
ary and Entertainment Center. 

"We are not scheduling it to be 
opened this season," said Wayne 
Foresta, village trustee. 

Village development officials will 
monitor the quality of the Ice and the 
condition of ice at the edge of the 
ponds. 

"We're not officially opening for 
skating this year," said Foresta. 

Legal fees towered 

Village trustees approved payment 
for bondservices at the Dec. 21 council 
meeting that was less than expected. 

Village Bond Counsel Harold War- 
ren, of Warren Associates, reduced the 
bill for his services to the village. 

"Harold (Warren) did discount his 
costs by SI 1,000," said Village manag- 
er Tim Wells. 

Both First National Bank- Employ- 
ee Owned and State Bank of The Lakes 
shared the purchase of the entire bond 
issue. Their joint purchase reduced 
the cost of issuing bonds for the village. 
As a result, Warren did no t have to pro- 
vide a full-range of services to sell the 
bonds nationally. 

Snow plowing 

Village trustees approved prepara- 
tion ofafive-year contract with Thelen 
Sand and Gravel for snowplowing ser- 
vices at their Dec. 21 meeting. 

Antioch streets will be plowed by 
the Antioch Public Works Department, 
Wayne's Service, and by Thelen Sand 
and Gravel. Each group is assigned 
specific areas of the village for which 
they are responsible. 

"(Thelen Sand and Gravel) did a 
very good job last year," said Village 
Manager Tim Wells. He recommend- 
ed that the trustees approve the agree- 
ment. 

The rates charged by private con- 
tractors are prevailing wage rates and 
include personnel and equipment 
costs. 

Cell telephone antenna 

Village Trustees directed Village At- 
torney Kenneth Clark to prepare an or- 
dinance to permit construction of a 
150-foot antenna. The pole is for AT&T 
Wireless for their cellular telephone 
business. 

The mono-pole will be erected on 
the western side of property owned by 
Antioch Tire Inc. near Route 173 and 
Deep Lake Road.. 

Village trustees approved the spe- 
cial use permit request in principle. 
However, the trustees agreed not to 
pass the ordinance and construction 
permit until Robert Silhan, Village Di- 
rector of Planning, Zoning and Build- 
ing, reports to them at a future meeting 
The Antioch Plan Commission 
recommended approval for the special 
use request pending site clean- up and 
code compliance. The commission 
also requested that glare from securi- 
ty lights be diminished so that neigh- 
bors and passing traffic are not ad- 
versely effected. 

The security lights were installed 
to protect outside storage areas from 
material theft. 

The ordinance for the special use 
is scheduled to be read at the Monday, 
Jan. 4 village board meeting. 

If Silhan reports that site condi- 
tions have been improved, the trustees 
may pass the ordinance on Monday, 
Jan. 18 




Caption: 

Betty Schneider, left, and Shirley Simek, both of the Antioch Woman's Club, stand with veterans at 
the North Chicago Veterans Administration Medical Center, Tuesday, Dec. 8. The woman's club 
sponsors bingo parties for veterans as well as a special holiday party. — Photo provided 

AWC helps special celebrations 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Members of the Antioch 
Woman's Club continue to pro- 
vide special, personal occasions 
for senior citizens and veterans in 
Lake County. 

Members recently hosted a 
special holiday party for veter- 
ans at North Chicago Veterans 
Administration Medical Center, 
in addition to the regular 
monthly visits to play bingo 
with them. 

-'In January, club members will ■ 
host birthday celebrations at 
Winchester House in Libertyville 
for residents. 
'. For many years, Betty Schnei- 



der and two or three 'members 
have played bingo with' veterans, 

"We go, once a month," she 
said. They play bingo and share 
refreshments with about two 
dozen veterans. 

This month they were able to 
host a special holiday party. 

"That is the first time we've 
ever done that," she said. 

It was made possible by dona- 
tions the club received on Reci- 
procity Day, a special meeting of 
Lake County area woman's clubs 
to coordinate activities and learn 

-of one another's programs. The 

Antioch Club took a special col- 
lection to buy gifts for the veter- 
ans. ; ". ' / 
"They gave us enough money 



for a sweatshirt, T-shirt, and 
socks," she said. Wrapped pack- 
ages of the. gifts were distributed 
to each veteran. 

"It was really lovely," Schnei- 
der said. "It was a great time." . 

In January, Antioch Woman's 
Club members will go to Win- 
chester House in Libertyville to 
meet with residents who have 
birthdays that, month. 

Residents ask for special and 
personal items. 

The Antioch Woman's Club 
has a budget to pay for thegifts.; ; 

"There's usually about five 
other women "who go," she said. 

Woman's club members take f 
birthday cake and help the resi- 
dents celebrate their birthday. - 






Internet finds welcome in Antioch 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



It was a good, busy year for 
building a web site-based business 
in downtown Antioch. 

JudithC. Kallos, webmaster at 
Lake On-line, 391 Lake Street, has 
been recognized for excellent 
business services. She has started 
an Internet program with Ziff- 
Davis, opened a Lake County cha- 
troom on Yahoo!, and started giv- 
ing away copies of The Game of 
Antioch. 

In addition, everything she did 
the year before continued to build on 
itself. 

"I'm having a blast," she said. 

Her evident fun and excitement 
with the Internet brought forth a 
business award. Kallos was a recipi- 



iii i- 1. rum ut 



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(2nd Floor, Center Court) 

(647)473-1345 



20 N. Michigan Ave. 

Chicago 

(312)348-0222 



ent of the LUCI award at a Oct. 7 
breakfast at the Marriott Lin- 
colnshire complex. The awards were 
hosted by the Lake County Women's 
Coalition, the Lake County Associa- 
tion for Home Community Educa- 
tion, and the Women's Business 
Journal. 

The award recognizes excellence 
in business services. It is given to rec- 
ognize women with strong business 
accomplishments and leadership in 
Lake county. The award is sponsored 
by Manpower, Inc. and Ameritech, 
Inc. as well as the Women's Business 
Journal. 

"It was a tremendous experi- 
ence," she said of the award. She was 
one of 17 recipients. 

Kallos' istudio continues to pro- 
vide a television program over the 
Internet to answer questions about 
computers. The Thursday afternoon 
program is done in association with 
Ziff-Davis, a national Internet media 
publisher. 

. Lake County Online Communi- 
ty Club started service in early Sep- 
tember. It is an on-line area at Yahoo! 
for members to participate in live 
chats, post messages, and share in- 
formation. 

"We have, received literally 
hundreds of e-mails from Lake 
On-line visitors telling us that they 
wanted a way to communicate 
and hangout on-line with others 
in the Lake County computer 
community," Kallos said. "Lake 
Online is known for serving up 
what our visitors ask for." 

' She is now working to let peo- 
ple in Lake County know that this 
service is available. "This should 



be a very active area on-line for 
those in Lake County looking to. 
communicate with others in the 
area." 

There is no cost. At www.lake- 
online.com, browsers click on the 
Yahoo! Club banner and then just 
follow the instructions to be part 
of the conversation. 

Kallos is giving away The 
Game of Antioch to people who' 
submit photographs of their hol- 
iday home decorations. She posts 
them on the Lake-online web 
page. 

"If selected, they will receive a 
free Game of Antioch," Kallos said. "I 
bought a whole bunch of games." 

Winners can claim their 
prize at her istudio, 391 Lake 
Street, downtown Antioch, The 
photographs can be submitted 
electronically to support@lake- 
online.com or by the U. S, Postal 
Service. The games must be ob- 
tained in person at the istudio. 

Kallos has been building her 
business for almost three years, as of 
April. Her. website of Lake County 
events and other services receives 
visits from almost 11,000 people per 
month. 

It's getting really close to 12K," 
she said.: 

It is a site with more than 1,000 
types of ; information. "I'm very 
proud of that. It's been a lot of help 
from out-sources^" she said. 

The site receives about 100 e- 
mails a week from people interested 
in Lake County hotels, motels, and 
businesses." 

"Plans for that site are ongoing 
and never ending," she said. 







The New. 



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MUNDELEIN 






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+ Dancing with band 

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00 



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+ Lavish food & dessert buffet 8 pm to 10 pm 

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+ FVee Continental breakfast with coffee 

station at midnight $ 7 ' f)00 

+ Tax & gratuity included : - i XJ £^, 



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BUFFET NEXT MORNING 

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•{•Champagne toast at midnight 

•*• Party favors for everyone 

+ Balloon drop at midnight 
. «t»Open call bar 8 pm to lam 

♦Free Continental breakfast with 
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+Fuli breakfast buffet next morning 

•fr Tax & gratuity included 

tgmv <Sc Dinner ^ Vandn^Sn 



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Carved'to order Prime Rib 

Au Jus 
Horseradish Cream Sauce 
Fillet of Salmon 

Citrus Marinade 
Twice Baked Potatoes • 
Chicken Breast Stuffed with 

Spanish & Roasted Wild 

Mushrooms 
Herb Roasted Seasonal Vegetables 

"Dessert Statwtv Includes miniature French pastries, 
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A12 /Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 1, 1999 



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D1 /Lakeland Newspapers 



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January 1^1999 



JNew 




onstren 



*■ 



The Ford Expedition puts on a fresh face for 
1999 and makes functional changes, includ- 
ing higher horsepower ratings* to retain its' 
reputation as a full-size SUV for those who 
want to ride in comfort and style without 
trading off utility, 

"Expedition offers the.optimum combina- 
tion of carlike comfort and go-anywhere, do- 
anythlng versatility," said j.C. Collins, Ford 
multipurpose vehicle brand manager. "Expe- 
dition's rugged good looks, power and size 
make it the vehicle of choice for city driving 
or off-road adventure," 

A new front fascia, grille and bumper sys- 
tem and fog lamps Incorporated into the low- 
er valance lend Expedition a freshened, ajg- 
gressive look. 

On the inside, Expedition sports a new 
seating fabric for improved comfort and 
durability. The available third-row fold-flat •■■ 
seat incorporates a wheel system for easy seat 
removal and installation. 
PEDAL SYSTEM FITS ALL 

Optional power-adjustable brake arid ac- -. 
celerator pedals, a first for the sport utility. " 
: segment, are offered on the 1999 Expedition. 
Activated by ari illuminated instrument pan- 
el-mounted switch which operates a small 
12-volt motor on the pedals, the adjustment 
offers up to 3 inches of linear travel. 

The feature is especially beneficial to v 
shorter drivers b^eriabUriifthern to i sUf&thc 




"The changes to these engines contribute 
to improved trailer towing and overall perfor- 
mance at city and highway speeds - all very ■ . 
Important to truck customers," said Dan 
Kapp, manager, 5.4-Hter Engine Programs. 

The standard 4.6-liter V-8 makes 240 horse- 
power at 3,500 rpm, an increase of 25 hp. 
'Torque improves to 296 foot-pounds/from 
29, at 3,500 rpm. The optional 5.4-liter V-8 



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For 1999, Btpedition's Triton 7 ^ engines de- 
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lock 
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1999 FEATURE 
HIGHLIGHTS 

1 Keyless entry hurheric keypad 
on driver's door 

► Freshened front end appear- 
ance 

; 6-disc CD changer made 
standard on fddie Bauer 

» Driver's side 6-Way power ad- 
just seats 

• Power, improved on the Tri- 
ton"' 4,6-liter and 5.4-liter 
V8 engines 

• New standard wheels 

• Electronic automatic temp, 
control heating'cooling sys- 

' tern standard" on Eddie Bauer 



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Used Care at Raymond Chevy/Olde in Antioch Used Care al Ray Chevrolet in Fox Loke 



1993 Chtvy Conv»rtlon Van v - : 
afc»1OT8M ■ - • $6.995 

1992 ChruHer Lebanon LX Corwl 

saewBoC;-- ■-••• .L$6.995 



1995 Oodg* Caravan 



_$7.995 



199ft Dodg« Durango ALT 

1997 Ch»vg Tbho« 4-dr L© «4 • 

• stk wror: ___$2©.995 

1994 Mazda 626 CO 
Stk«94Q7A- 



1990 Toyolc Gamry 



_$10.9?5 
_$3.995 



l997.Ch«vg Comoro R8 i'JSiJ;^ 

Stk »KB5U- ■:• ;,: — V' : ' -$16:49.5. ; 

i 1995 Bute* L«9cbf» WmUed:.-. ;''--" 

i»Uta Sk#WW ^_±.$17^95; 

■ 1986 Cadillac Sedan DpvUto;- -". 
Stk»M6M. , - •'*• $2.495 

■ 1998 Old» Bravado *WD . _ ■ 
SkWtBB: ■ ' • $22.995 
1996 Joep Grand CherofcwAXjJ - 

Sft#P4257l^_ -$18,995 

1986 Ford Bfonco 
Stt#tt1S98- 



1995 PonHoc Grand AM QT , 
S&#9851JL_ __$10,9?5- 



1997 Goo Prlxm 
Stk#f4T79L 



1996 Old* Clera 

sawast 



-$9,995 
_$9.995 



^P onHaceunb.rdCoupo ^ oo|| - 

MHO Honda McomultDR ■ 

, awill- £9,995 



1993 GMC K1500 Ext Cob 4x4 ■ 

si mn ^-"'•'. — ^-$17,995 



1969 Ford Rongor 4x4 



"l993PbrdT-Blitf 

s&msoa. 



1994 Ch«vy K2500 Exl 
Stk«UHA- 



1991MaidaRX7 
£7KWta.Slk«673IBL 



_$7.995 
.$17,995 



1997 Ch«vg 610 Pick Up 
#P225L 



1995 Ponttoc Bonn»vltio &i 
Slk#1060IUU 



-$13,995 
W98 GMC Suburban 8LT 4X4 
SIX #P4709 ' : — -■■ ■' $ 51,495 ? 

1993 Ford Bronco 4X4 eddlo Oautr 
Stk »M21B '• — -$12,495 



_$6>95 
i$8.'995 

l994 Dcdge Condon ,^ ^ 

1994 Morcunj Cougar XR7 - 

StkWOSW ■ : — _:$7.995 

l992OW«D«Uae8R0Ual : ^ >, 

Stk if2«I*- : — -^-$9,995 \ 

1993 HlMan 4X4 PAJ 
Stktffltt 



'1993- 



T^ffiP 



,11991 Codigooek^rado.florrjfeT^gvi 
\ Sft»P«3Mr - ■; • ;jZ:':- .-?*<W& 

Ij$7.9v5 

^$101995 



1991 Ford Rohgor 9JX 
•g>t6BM' : — 

1992 Chovy C1500 
Sk#£T6aU. 



1996 Jnp Chorokoo 
Slk #F2457. 



1993 Pign}6u*r» Grand Vpuosirj^-i 



•W«9Jt: 



.C-*-' "^ v dx'i »>*Te,. 



.1992 Chevy CISCO 



^20.993iJ 
995« 

'" ~**y lf^*t.* ■■*.*!;*' - L '',^- 

X£^.59.995<r 



.$11,995 



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Bull) Stores FeaUne 100s 
Gl Di.isliiMlly Reiluceil 
Pre Dtivens Must Ate 
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1994 Ct»«jr,Q12Q COTver^pTL } ± .-* ■ 
Stk WBMf f, ' , -- : •-• - S13.995 
199*'Fb»F;150 S/C4X4 ft 1—^1 

:sik«W7r 4-; ■ — ; •' : $ift.9?5 ■;: 

:t9?5 Chovg U»ro Con*. , >._ _._ ,i 
$tk#W<m-. v ? $15^5.; 

1996 Dodge Rom 4X4 WOO * r ^ ' :!£.. 
EtkWTWI - ' . _| ; *'y - $19,995. 

$23,995 



la 



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1997CheyvJK1500.ext 

■ W , fn pt-V'»''" • " $1^.995 



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* Plus tax, title; license & doc feer Alt vehicles subject to prior s«Jss. See. deals r.f or details. 

Visit UsOn'JWfel nternet At: vww.rQys-cars^com^ 







Ztiu^eaai 






^%ti$r ' Chevy /Olds 



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A** , irn 






(847) 395-3600 
Route 173 
Antioch 



f^-u c ri C? H Go) "'urn Noon 



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Chevrolet 



39 N. Route 12 
Fox Lake 



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1 ?r#s 



D2 / Lakeland Newspapers . 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



January 1, 1999 



ROC KEN BACH CHEVROLET^»THE MEGA STORE 

We Have The Best Inventory in the Country-2700 uehicBesin Stick 



25 Mill. From 

Schaumburg 



18 Min. From 
Arlington Heights 



1999 Chevy 



9.495 



T $ 184 



36 
mo 



SSSHHSEEKn? 




1999 Chevy Malihu 

13.495 



10.29 



Jotal due at lease Ince ption: $400 plus tax, title, lie, and doc. 



1999 Chevy Blazer 4x4 



18.895 




Lease 

For 



36 

mo 



I 




Lease MJ 
For 

. 36 mo 



due at lease Inception: $486 plus tax, title, lie, an d doc, ; 



due at lease incept 




plus 



, UIIU, IIU, I 



rdoc. tee. 



1999 Chevy Venture 



VT^jV^^ 



JtM»>feiW»Wrgs. , iMfeoi. 



«^^^^^^^£ 



17.774 



Jotal due at lease Inception: $586 plus tax, title, lie, and doc. fee. 




< 



1 1 



20.445 



u s s 314 



36 
mo 




Jotal due at lease inception: $679 plus tax, title, lie, and doc. fee.' 



We Haue Great Selection of Blazers, Hahoes, (Conversion vans, Corvettes, Malebus a TrucOis 





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'93 Plymouth Voyager Van $7,990 '90 CMC Suburban 4x4 Conv. $6,990 '97 Plymouth Bree 

'94 Pontiac Sunfire Conv't $6,990 '97 Chevrolet Cavalier 4dr. $7,990 '97 Chevrolet Cor\ 

'98 Chevrolet Cavalier *«, etv^m&l 0,990 '96 Ford Thunderbird $8,990 '96 Pontiac Grand 

'97 Pontiac Grand Am 4dr. $11,490 '97 Chevrolet Comoro cpe. $13,490 '96 Chevy Corsica 



$5,990 
$72,990 



'98 Geo Prtem 4dr. 



$10,990 '93 Chevy Beretta cpe. 



$6,490 '94 Chevy Astro Van 



$9,990 '96 Chevrolet Cavalier 2dr. $5,9 

$3S,990 '98 Chevrolet Malibu 4dr. $12,9 

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'93 GMC Sierra SLEP/U Ext.Cab. 


$12,990 


'93 Nissan P/U 


$5,890 


'98 Chevy S-10ZR2 ExtCab,4x4. 
'93 Chevrolet 1500 P/U 

. i ... 


$20,990 
$5,990 


'95 Chevrolet S~10 P/U 


$8/490 


'92 Chevrolet P/U 4x4 


$12,990 


'92 Chevy S~10 Ext Cab 4x4 


$8,990 


'94 Ford Ranger XLT P/U 


$7,990 


'96 Dodge Dakota P/Up 


$13,990 


'94 Chevy K2SOQ 4x4 Ext. Cab 


$14,950 


'92 Ford F-1 50 XLT P/U 


$12,990 


'93 Ford F-1 50 P/U 


$6,990 


'97 Chevrolet 5-1 OP/UP Sport Boxll 


$9,990 


'92 GMC 1500 P/U 


$7,990 



SUVS & VANS 

'90 Jetp Wrangler $4,990 

'96 Chevy Express Cargo Van $16, 990 

*94 Chivy Suburban "454" 3/4 Ton $19,990 

'90 GMC Suburban 4x4 Conv. Van $6,990 

'94 Chevrolet K-B!azer $17,990 

'92 Ford Winnebago Conv. Van $10,990 

'96 Dodge Grand Caravan LE MUST SEE 

'94 Toyota 4-RunnerSRS V6,4x4ll $16,990 

'97 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo $22,990 

'92 Chevy Conv. Van $7,990 

'93 Chevrolet$-10 Blazer $7,990 
'93 Plymouth Grand Voyager Loaded,sharp! $8,995 

'93 Chevrolet Suburban 4x4 $14,990 

'92 GMC Jimmy SLE $9,990 

'92 Jeep Cherokee. . $6,990 

'97 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer $29,990 

'91 Toyota Previa Low Miles' $1 1,990 

'96 Geo Tracker Auto! $9,990 



COUPES & SEDANS 

'92 Bulck Road master LTD. Sharp! $9,990 

'90 Pontiac Bonneville LE .■■ $5,990 

'95 Saab 900 Bluer "■[' ' $15,990 

'93 Chrysler New Yorker ] $6,990 

:'97 Honda Civic EX cpe. $13,990 

'94 Chevrolet Cavalier 2dr. $6,990 

'94 Dodge Shadow Auto. $5,990 

'95 Saturn Sc2 cpe. $9,990 

'95 Dodge Neon Auto, 4dr. $6,990 

'96 Honda Accord $14,990 

'93 Lincoln Mark 8 $12,990 

'95 Ford Contour $8,990 

>96 Chevrolet Corsica $9,990 

f96 Ford Thunderbird Loaded,sharp. $10,995 

'93 Chevy Cavalier Auto, 4dr. $5,990 

.'92 Mazda Protege $5,990 

'95 Pontiac Bonneville SSEI Like Brand New! $17,990 



SPORTS CARS 

•87 Chevy Corvette Conv't Bed, mint, 38K miles, V/OY/I 
'91 Pontiac Sunblrd Conv't Red, sharp. $5,990 
'92 Chevrolet Corvette $17,990 

'92 Ford Mustang Conv't $6,990 

'94 Ford Probe , $8,990 

'9 1 ' Nissan cpe. 240-SX $5, 990 

'93 Ford T-Bird Leather! $6,790 

'81 Chevrolet Corvette Super Clean! MUST SEE 
'84 ChevyCorvette Blue forYoukow low miles!! $8,995 
'94 Mitsubishi Eclipse Hatch Back! $4,990 

'96 Ford Mustang Alloys, loaded, red. $11,995 
•96 Mitsubishi Eclipse i $15,990 

'97 Chevy Camaro Cpe. BlackBeauty. $13,995 
'97 Chevy Camaro Conv't Sharp! $15,990 

'91 Chevrolet Corvette $16,990 

'98 Chevy Corvettes r*ornmimo*xrjisa*nannt*MUSTSEEl 
'92 Cadillac Atlanta Hard Top Conv't $22,795 



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USED CARS 



On RIB: 120 

Between 1-94 
andRte. 83 
In Brayslake 

,,.,-. iau ., ,. .-' *t -satt-FUiNi- .._ ,.., 

I All prices plus tax, title, lie. and $44.58 doc tee, all Incentives applied.* 0% APR on approved credit for max. 48 months on pre-owned vehicles, 12-24 mos.'on hew *98 & '93s, 48 mos. on Conversion Vans. Not subsidized by MfrJ 
Requires 20% down cash or trade. May effect final sale price. Wot to be used with any other factory programs or advertised specials. ± Based on a 36-month closed-end lease," plus tax, title, license and doc. tee, through GMAC ;■■ 
to qualified buyers with approved credit12,000 miles per year, 15(S per mile over. Consumer responsible lormalntenance and termination. All factory rebates and Incentives applied. See dealer for details. Total payments/residual 
Cavalier $7;164/$6 t 190.50rMallbu $8,46Q/$9,396.45; Conversion Van $1 1.844/S1 5,60639; Blazer$10i296/$13.197,00; S-10 $6,964/$7,341,64, _/_ : . 





flang 



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, 



, i i n i *" ■ i Wm p^pt^ — *»f 



January 1, 1999 



ri M ^i*^ji*>t»<-*«^' 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers / D3 



l 



uMiMMnm«iio«min«| 



W 
'0 
»0 

w 

W 
90 
EE 

95 
90 
SS 
190 

>9S 
i90 
>90 
SEEt 
795 



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I 



by.Mfr, 
JMAC 

5sldua! 




EXPEDITION: Build on strengths 



Jumps to 260 hp, from 230, at 4,500 rpm, and 

'torque rises to 245 foot-pounds, from 325 at 
2300 rpm. ' 

Members of the Triton™ family of modular 
engines, both have chain-driven single over- 
head cams (SOHC) with a reinforced block 
and tuned Intake. They feature a deep-skirt 

. cylinder block, cross-bolted main bearing 
caps and aluminum cylinder heads. 

Pistons with friction coating and low ten- 
sion rings contribute to fuel economy and 
precise oil control. The direct-mount accesso- 
ry drive includes a long-life, hon-neoprene 
belt for durability andreliablUty.Both engines> 
also i.have.a large, six-quart capacity oil pan, 
which helps the engine to run cleaner and 
cooler between oil changes. 

The fail-safe cooling system helps protect 
the engines againstdamage due to loss of - 
coolant, while allowing drivers additional 
timeto obtain servicing. . 
The 5^4-liter Triton™ engine, also available 

. in the F-Series, Econoline and Lincoln Navi- • 
gator, captured Ward's Auto World's " 10 Best 
Engines" award for the second consecutive 
year in 1998. It'wasthe only truck engine hon- 
ored. 

~ Both Expedition engines are teamed with a 
four-speed automatic transmission with over- 
drive top gear. The 4R70W automatic is mated 





Inside the roomy Expedition. 

to the 4;6-JileT engine, and the electronically 
. controlled 4R100 automatic is linked with the 
optional 5.4-liter V-8. 



TEST DRIVE THE EXPEDITION AT 

THESE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS: 

Fox Lake Ford 

90 S. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-3400 

Lyons & Ryan Ford 

14 W. Route 173, Antloch 

395-3900 

Victor Ford 

Route 12, Wauconda 

526-5541 




By Dan Fried lander 






r^rt 



"Unfortunately, It doesn'tpay to be a nice 
U have a^ ^ i4 pftt ^ ^ri J i m 

, .JttesidentUrPertderjMendertJ 
Griive VUlogV and VVheellhg.' 

He'safd he feels sorry for nice people who- * 
two or three times a day come into his, repair 
facilities stating the other person involved in 
an accident asked them hot to.call the police. 
The person at fault tellsrthe accident victim, .\. 
"I'll handle the payment myself to fix the car." 
"But it will bite you after-you agree to this," 
said Rosenfield. He said that event a little 
bump can cost more than $1,000 to repair. He 
warned that "if the estimate is too high for the 
indiwdual who caused the' accident, he|U say 
T wasn't even involved." . 

Rosenfield offered advice on what to do 
when you are involved Jn an accident "First, 
file a police report and make sure the police 
establish who is at fault It is important as to 
who gets the ticket," he stated. 

He explained that some insurance compa- . 
nies, especially non-standard or high risk ' 
companies, will sometimes try.to stick you . 
with part of the repair bill. These kind of com- 
panies try to establish a percentage of who 
was at fault,' Rosenfield said.. 

After establishing fault, the Fender Menders 
executive said you should exchange insur- 
ance information and make sure the person 
who hit you files the accident report with his 
insurance company. Unless the person files, 
there i will be along delay in processing your 
claim, said Rosenfield, 

After you report the accident to the insurance 
company, that firm may want repair estimates. 
Some companies have drive-in claim centers. 
Others will send outan adjuster and some in- 
surance people will tell you to get two or three 
estimates and they will pay the. lowest estimate. 
. "Most people don't know it buTthe cus- 
tomer has the right to go'tprwhatever repair 
shop they want.to fix their c'ar,'^ said the 
Fender Menders presided t.^It is up' to the 
shop to come *° ah agreed price with the in- 
surance company to repair the car properly. 
"You cannot be forced to get two or three 
estimates. You can tell the insurance people 
what shop you intend to go to and if they 
have a problem with the estimate then they ■ 
have to send an adjustorio theshop to come 
to an agreed price to fix the car." ■ 

Shop estimators knowing there will be two !. 
or three estimates; often low ball the estimate 
by ignoring some of the damage. The repair ■ 
people later will tell the insurance company 
they found hidden damage and before long, 



the low bidder may be higher than the high 
bidder when you /originally sought estimates. 
"Put very.simply, it does not pay for a shop to 



ww'onljtMhijo'ii 



B 



. 



S xvtia rthex sec. OTOfTtfjOUgfr tn. 

r be hidden Interior damage/ 1 , said Rdsenfleld.' 
Even at insurancecompany's own drive-in 
claim centers, they bnly.write loW prelfminary 

5 estimates. They do this for. two reasons^ 
One, many times theinsuranced or ' 
claimant will just take the money and cash 
out and not get the car repaired. Two, the re- 
pair center may just fix the car as per the in- 
surance company's estimate and not bother 
to request for the additional supplemental re- 
pairs. This ends up saying the insurance com- 

: parties millions of dollars annually. 

The biggest confusion or argument arise . 
whe n you go out and get an estimate that i s 
ten, twenty or thirty percent higher than the 
insurance company estimate. The customer 
always feels he is being cheated or he will 
have to come up with additional monies to 
get his car repaired properly. 

I nsurance company clai ms. p eople know . 
there will be hidden damage and will come 
up with extra money to fix it. It is, however, 

. the obligation of the body shop to contact the 
insurance company and to document the ad? 
ditional damage togetmoney. to repair it." 
He said the motorists in the accident are 
not obligated to go to a direct repair shop of 
the insurance company. This is for the conve- 
nience of.the insurance company. 

Rosenfield quickly added the Fender 
Menders has been certified as a direct and as 
a preferred repair center by more than 20 in- 
surance companies. 

He also advised not to become involved if 
the other party has a problem with their in- 
surance carrier. "Don't make their problem 
your problem.". : 

He added that you can go directly to your 
insurance company for payment but you will 

. have to pay the deductible, The deductible 
will be reimbursed when the other insurance 
; carrier takes responsibility for the accident. 
Finally, said Rosenfield, the insurance 
company has the obligation to provide 
you with a loaner car of the same quality 
of the one yoti.were driving that was in 
the accident. 

The Fender Menders executive added that 
he feels sorry for people who try to be nice 
guys and hot have a police report filed. They 
often are very sorry about not doing it. For 
more information on what to do after an acci< 

'■■'■ dent you can contact Rosenfield at 847/640- 

• 1777or.847/215-2255. 



• fflgn 



® . 

ACURA 

1 Acura of Libortyvllle 
1620 S. Milwoukee Avt, Libtrtyvillt 
6BO-7333, 



Hia«);l»J 



Pauly Acura 

Routti 41 & 22, Highland Pork 
433-8200 



© 



• Korl Knauz Motors 
407 Skoklt Valley Hwy, Lake Oluff 
604-5000 



DUICK' 



Buss Ford 

3925 W. Route 120, McHenry 

(615) 385:2000 

Fox Lake Ford-Mercury Inc. 

90 S. Route 12, Few LoU 
5>7-3400 . 
Lyons-Ryan Ford : 
104 W. Route 173, Antloch 
3953900 

1 Celozzi Ford 

3100 Grand Avt. (Rte. 132), Wouktgan 
336-2340 

1 Sessler Ford Inc. 

1010 S. M.lwoukee Avt., UbtflyviDt 
362-4550 . 

► Victor Ford 
Route '12 (N, of Rte. 176). Waucondo 
526-5541 




• Knauz Continental Motors 
407 Skokit Hwy, Uke Bluff 
234-1700 



• Anthony Pontiac/ 
"GMCTruck/Bukk 

2727 Bifvidirt Rd. (Rtt. 120), Woukeocn 
244-1010 • 

•. Knauz of Lake Forest , 
-1044 N. Western Ave., Lake Forest 
234-2800- 

,• Liberty Auto City 
" 1000 E. Park Ave.', Libertyville 
362-2663 

• Mitchell fluick^Oldsmohik & 
GMC Truck • 

903 N. Front Street, McHenry. 
/ (815)385-7200 

• Country Buick/Pontioc 
845 Main St., Antloch 
395-4400 



• Anthony Pontiac/GMC/Bulck 

2727 Btlvidtrt Rd,, Waukegan 
244-1010 

• Mitchell Buick-Oldimobile S 
GMC Truck 

903 N. Front Strut McHtnry 
(815)385-7200 

• Patrick Pontiac-GMC Truck Inc. 
1120 S; Milwaukee Ave., Ubertyville 
680-5000 

• Pedorsen GMC Truck 
Corntrs of Rtei. 45 & 173, Antloch 
395-3700 




Weil Oldsmobile Cadillac Inc. 

1050 5. Milwaukee Avt., Libertyville 

362-4100 

Gary Lang Pontiac- 

Codilloc Subaru 

1107 S. Rout«'3i; McHtnry 

(815)385-6000 



CHEVROLET. 



• Bernard Chevrolet/lsuzu 

^ J^^MilwauJtsa.Aafi-JiUuwilIt, 



- ' ■ '» ". .ij 
Boehmer ChevrofeVGeo 
416 WfUbtrty (Rte. 176) Waucondo 
526-2424 

• CiossicChevrolet Inc. 

425 N. Green Boy Rd., Wouktgon 
3364300 

• Gary Lang Chevrolet/Geo. 
1107 S. Route 31, McHenry 

J (815)385*2100 

• Ray Chevrolet I nc% 
39 N. Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-3300 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. ■ ^ 

"'120 W. Lake St. (Rtt." 173)1 Aptioch 
395-3600 ', 

• Rockehboch Chevrolet 
1000 E. Belvidert Rd., Grayslake 
223-8651 

• Shepord Chevrolet 
930 Carriage Ln„ Lake Bluff 
234- 7900 



niRTSUK 



• Knauz of Lake Forest 
1044 N. Western Ave., Lake Forest 



4-2800 

• Lab County Chrysler-Plymouth 
540 5. Green Boy Rd, Waukegan 
336-4500 

1 Lake Villa Chrysler-Plymouth 
Jeep/Eagle 

130 Cedar Ave., Lake Villa 
356-2530 

1 Sandy McKie & Sons 
Chrysler-Plymouth" Dodge Truck' 
91 5. Route 12, Fox Lake 

. 587-6471 • 

• Sunnyside Dodge-Chrysler- 
Plymouth 

4810 W.EIm St., McHenry 
(815)385-7220 




Antioch Dodge 
105 Rte. 83, Antioch 
395-0200 

Fohrman Auto Mart 
2725 Btlvidiri Rd., Wauktgon 
336-3510 

Miller-Krueger Dodgt 
119 N. Milwaukee Ave., Ubtrtyvillt 
362-3800 

Sandy McKie & Sons 
Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
■91 S, Route 12, Fox Lake 
587-6471 

Surinyslde Dodge-Chrysler- 
Plymouth— 

4610 W. Elm St, McHenry 
(815) 385-7220 




M 



• Pouly Honda 

1111 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
'36243CKK . 

• Rosen Honda 

Rte, 132 (Grand Ave.), Gurnee 
623-7673 




Liberty Auto Gty 

1000 E. Pork Ave. (176), Libertyville 

360-2683 \ 

Gurnee Hyundai VW-Olds -. 
Rlt;41 eWVajKngtonSUGumet/WouLegcn 

"Ti^11tQ n ti1T'^n'iT^T 



FIN I 
Fields Infiniti: 
.1121 S. Mihwukit Avt, Ubtrtyvillt 
36Z-9200 



ISUZU 



1 Bernard Chevrolet/lsuzu 
1001 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
3620400 , 

Jim M'lody Oldimobile-iiuzu & Nissan 
5656 NW Hwy., Crystal Lake 

' (800) 566-5239 



JeeR' 



Country Jeep^Eagle. 
3017 W. Route 120, McHenry 
(815)363-9999 

Delf's Jeep 

1521 BervidertRd,Woukegan - 

623-1492 • 

take Villa Chrysler-Plymouth Jeep Eagle 

130 Cedor Ave., Lake Villa 

356-2530, 

Liberty Jeep Eagle 

1000 L Pork Ave., Libertyville 

362-2683 




Land Rover of Lake Bluff 
375 N.Skokie Hwy, lake Bluff 
604-8100 



• Fox Lake Ford/ 
90S. Route. 12, Fox Loke 
587-3400. 

• Libertyville Lincoln/Mercury Inc. 
941 S. Milwoukee Ave., Ubertyyille 
367-1700 : 

• Lyons^Ryan Ford-Uncotrt-Mercury Inc. 
104 W. Route 173, Antloch 
395-3900 

■ Don McCue Lincoln-Mercury Inc. 
660 W. NW Hwy., Barrington 
382-5600 

• Mitchell-Potts LJncoln/Mercury 
907 N. Front St, McHenry 

' (815)'38^0403 

• Rosen Lincoln-Mercury < 

. 100 N. Green Boy Rd,, Waukegan 
'623-7673 



Libertyville Auto Gty 
1000 E. Park Ave., Libertyville 

362-2683 

Rosen Mazda 

.100 N. Green Bay Rd„ Waukegan- 

662-2400 . 




Libertyville Mitsubishi 

1119 S. Milwaukee An., Libtrtyville 

816-6660 



rm %i 



• Liberty Nissan KJo V&ikswagen 
921 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
680-8000 

• Union Nissan 

3315 Grand Ave. (Rtt. 132). Waukegan 
244-8000 

<2>Oldsmobl(o 

• Gurnee Olds VW/Hyundai 

Rte. 4 1 1WeihingtM St, Gurnee/Waulfaoft 
249-1300 

• Mitchell Buiek-Oldsmobile & 
; GMC Truck 

903 N. Front Street, McHenry 
s (815)385-7200. 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc. 

120 W. Route 173, Antioch 
395-3600 

• Weil Oldsmobile/Codilloc Inc. 
1050 S. Milwaukee Ave., Uberiyville 
362-4100 ' 



PONTIAC 



TES 



tqert 



• Anthony Pontiac/GMCTruck/Buick 
2727 BeHidere Rd. [Rte. 120). Woulegan 
244-1010 

• Gary Lang Pontiac Cadillac 
& Subaru 

1107 S. Route 31, McHenry . 
(815) 385-6000 

• Patrick Pontiac GMCTjuck Inc. 
1120 S. Mtlwoukit Avt, Libtrtyvillt 
680-5000 
■ Counuyjontlac/Buick :..,. 






i man mtmn. «mw» 

3953400?^ 



® 



The Saab Exchange 
2300 Skokie Volley Rd. (Rte. 41) 
Highland 'Park 
432-9300 




SAtlKN. - 
** Saturn of Libertyville 
■1160 5. Milwaukee Ave, Libertyville 
362-6600. 
• Saturn of Waukegan 
■ 500 S. Green Bay Rd., Waukegan 
360-5000 




• Gary Lang Ponliac Cadillac Subaru 
1111 S. Route 31, McHenry 
(815)385-6000 

• Liberty Subaru 

1000 L Pork Avt, Libertyville 
362-2683 

# SUZUKI 

• Liberty Auto Gty 

1000 E. Park Ave, (176) libertyville 
362-2683 

® TOYOTA 

• Classic Toyota 

425 S. Green Bay Rd, Waukegan 
336-4300 ( 

• Pauly Toyota 

5417 NW Hwy, Crystal Lake 
(815)459-7.t00 ' 

Fahrvebgnugin , ■ 

Liberty Nissan Volkswagen/Kla 
921 5. Milwaukee Ave, Libtrtyville 
680-8000 

Gurnee VW Olds Hyundai 

Rl»,<»&Wai)iiftgK)n£t,Gwn«/Wouk»90n 
249-1300 



vo 





• Fields Volvo 
1121 5. Milwoukee Ave, Ubtrtyvillt 
362-9200 



■ 



■ 
■ 



04/ Lakeland Newspapers AUTO MARKETPLACE January 1, 1999 





ce 




i ■ 



Cars far Sale 



1873 AMC HORNET, 
60,000 miles, straight 6, Interi- 
or excellent, looks and runs 
well. Great winter car. $650. 
(847) 838-0619. 

1988 900 TURBO CONVT., 
$6.850. (847) 432-9300. 

1990 MERCURY SABLE 
GS, 85,000 miles, good condi- 
tion, $2,200. (847) 566-5937. 



1991 900 TURBO CONVT., 
$11,850.(847)432-9300. 

t991 BUICK PARK AVE". 
Good condition, white with 
burgandy Interior. $5,400 
(847) 975-3799. 

1992 CORVETTE CON- 
VERTIBLE white with. white 
top, -garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(815)385-8468. 



1993 SATURN SL1, full 
power, anVfm stereo cassette, 
new tires and brakes, $4,500. 
(815)675-0351. ,__ 

900S CVT 1995, $17,950. 
(B47) 432-9300. '"■ 

BMW 3251 1994, $12,990. 
(815) 385-2100. 

BUiCK 1985 CENTURY 

WAGON Clean and reliable. 
Asking $l,500/bost. (414) 652- 
7952. __ 

BUICK 1992 SKYLARK 

SPORTY, red. 4-door, V6, air, 
auto-locks, good condition. 
$4,350/besl. (647) 356-6685. 

BUICK 1996 REGAL, 
34,000 miles, great condition. 
$14,000. (414) 552-2579 
aflor 5pm. 

CADILLAC 1991 ELDORA- 
DO BARRITZ, 49.995. (847) 
587-3300. ___ 

CADILLAC 1995 

DEVILLE, (815) 385-2100, 

CHEVROLET 1994 S-10 
BLAZER. 4-door, 4.3L V6, 
electronic 4x4, aluminum 
wheels, running boards, 

»* t&,UOO r—Jt !« / ■ " S 99-B BZe •. . ' .1 ' . 

after 6pm. 



HONDA CIVIC 1985, 

4-door, automatic, 

runs excellent, $995. 

Subaru Wagon 1986 4x4, 

automatic, air, 

runs excellent, $795. - 

Toyota Tercel 1987, 

2-door, 5-speed, 

runs excellont, 

must see, $595. 

Olds Cutlatt 1983, 

4-door, runs good, 

6-cylindor, $595. 

Chevy Celebrity Wagon 

- 1988, 

V6, automatic, 

runs good, $595. • 

Chevy 1977 C-20 Pick-up 

Truck, 

454 engine, 

runs excellent, $995, 

GRIFFIN QUALITY 

AUTO SALES 

26065 W. Grand Ave. 

Inglostde, III. 60041 

(847) 973-9377 

Bruce or Greg. 

HONDA DX 1997, 2-door, 

. perfect condition, 

$10,500/best. (414) 534-0094 

after 4pm. 

HYUNDAI ELANTRA 1996 
red. 30,000 miles, fully 
equipped Including CD player, 
alarm and sunroof, 
$7,950/best. (847) 543-1830. 

INFINITI 1995 JSO'S, 6 to 
choose with similar savings, 
leather, sunroof, $16,995. 
(B47) 362-9200. 

INFINITI Q45'S, $16,495. 
(847) 362-9200. 

L 

ISUZU STYLUS XS 1991, 

black, manual shift, air, Bose 
Stereo, maintenance up-to- 
date. New clutch, brakes, bat- 
tery etc. $3,000/best. (847) 
546-2132. '. 

JAGUAR 1991 XJ6 SOVER- 
IGN, excellent condition, 
52,000 miles, 516,500/bost. 
(847) 356-6194 after 6pm. 

LEXUS 1995 ES300, 
$18,995. (847) 362-9200. . 

LEXUS SC300 COUPE 
1992, (847) 362-9200. 

MAZDA 1991 RX7, $6,995. 
(847) 587-3300. 

MAZDA 1992 PROTEGE, 
.$5.990.. (.6471.823-6851 . 






— - V 



CHEVY 1991 CAVALIER 

RS, $3,995. (847) 395-3600, 

CHEVY 1992 . CAVALIER 

Z24. power everything, sun- 
roof, black, excetienl condi- 
tlon, $3,950. (847) 872-1646. 

CHEVY 1995 CAMARO, 
511.250,(847)244-1010. 

CHEVY 1996 CORSICA, 
$7,990. (815) 385-2100. 

CHEVY 1997 CAVALIER, 
$7,690. (815) 3B5-2100. 

CHEVY 1997 LUMINA, 4- 
door, while, maroon interior, 
fully loaded, low miles, A/C, ex- 
cellent condition. Must sell. 
Asking $12,500/best. Please 
call (847) 223-3161 after 5pm 
or leave message, 



DODGE 1986 600 good 
running car, $750/best. (647) 
587-6664 home, Joe (847) 
638-0889 work. , 

EXPRESS AUTO 
EXCHANGE 

USED CARS 

We take consignment bars. 

No charge, 

Too busy to sell your car? 

Let us do It for you. 

. (847) 740-1400 

119 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. 

(Across from Burger King). 

. Ask for Mike or Norm. 

1986 OLDS CUTLASS 
; SIERRA SILVER MOON- 
' LIGHT, A/C, heat, power 
locks, now tires, new brakes, 
new exhaust, new radiator, 
new cam shaft. "Runs great. 
Son left for Navy. Must sell. 
. $1,599. Ask for Mr. Coleman 
i (414) 654-6543 or leave mes- 
sage.' • ■.. 

FORD 1989 MUSTANG, 5- 
■speed, excellent' condition. 
.' Must sell. Asking $2:500, 
- (414)534-2123. ■ ' . 

FORD 1992 TAURUS GL 4- 
door, $4,669, (B47) 244-1010. 

FORD ,1993 THUNDER- 
BIRD, -excellent, .condition, 
loaded, CD player, sunroof, 
now llres and. battery. Must' 
sell, (847) 548-6164, 

' HONDA 1994 ACCORD 
. EX; : $9,176. (847) 244-1010, 



MAZDA .1994 626ES, 
$10,995.(847)395-3600. 

MERCURY 1987 TOPAZ 
LS, 4-door, all power, needs 
tune-up, $1,700/best. (414) 
652-5855 after 9pm. 



To advertise in 

this section, call 

(847)223-8161 



MERCURY 1992 SABLE 
LS 3.8L V6, A/C, ABS, alrbags. 
automatic, all power, leather 
seats, 78K, Blue book $7,650, 
asking $6,650. (847) 356- 
0852. 

MERCURY 1994 COUGAR 
XR7, $7,995. (847) 587-3300. 

MOVING OUT OF STATE. 
MUST SELL 1997 Black Pon- 
tlac Sunfire, 5-speed, 2-door 
sedan, A/C, cassette. Asking 
$9,900. (847) 438-4180. . 

NISSAN 1987 300ZX, ex- 
cellent condition, red, low 
miles, automatic, T-tops, 
$6,250. (647) 837-0153, 

OLDS 1993 CUTLASS SU- 
PREME, 2-door, excellent 
condition, new tires and 
brakes, extras. $5,O00/best. 
. (847) 728-1882. • 



OLDS 1994 CUTLASS SU- 
PREME SL', $7,990. (815) 
385-2100.- 

OLDS 1995 ACHIEVA S 
$7.932.(847) 244-1010. 

OLDS 1996 CIERA, $9,995. 
(847)395-3600. . 

PONTIAC 1992 BONNE- 
VILLE SSE, sunroof, leather 
seals, CD, excellent condition, 
$6,200/besl. (414) 724-5614, 

PONTIAC 1994 SUNFIRE 
CONVERTIBLE. $6,990. (847) 
■ 223-8651. 

PONTIAC 1995 BONNE- 
VILLE automatic, air, excel- 
lent condition, super clean- 
Must see. 47,000 miles, 
$l1,900/besi. (847) 

625-3372,(647)362-2023. 

PONTIAC 1997 GRAND 

AM, $11,99O..(8t5)385-2100.. ,. 



SAAB 1996 900S CON- 
VERTIBLE, $20,995, (847) 
382-9200. 

SUBARU 1994 LEGACY, 
$8,995. (B47) 587-3300. 

TOYOTA 19B7 CAMRY LE, 

automatic, power locks/wind- 
ows, sunroof, A/C, AM/FM 
cassette, runs great, 
$3,000/bOSt. (847) 925-8268 
after 6pm. 

TOYOTA 1988 TERCEL, 
stick, new clutch, good body, 
123K miles, $1,500/best. 
(847) 356-6643. ■ 

TOYOTA 1990 CAMRY DL, 
automatic, windows/locks, 
cruise, 4-door, air, cassette, 
asking $5,500. (847) 
746-7308. ■ 

TOYOTA 1990 CAMRY, 
' $3,995, (847) 395-3600. 

VOLVO SELECT 1998 
S7b'S, 10 to choose with si ml- 
lar savings, leather, sunroof, 
$24,995. (847) 362-9200. 



Service & Pahs 



ARE WHEELS. SET of. four 
American Racing Equipment 
15x8, GM bolt pattern. True 
spoked wheels. Good shape, 
$150.(847)548-1115, 

BMW WHEELS SET OF 
FOUR, to fit 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 ser- 
ies. Mille Miglia 5 spoke 
wheels with Yokohama AVS 
tires. 50% tread left, wheels In 
good shape, $700. (847) 540- 
1115. 

CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL SALE. Mustang, Cam- 
era, Nova, Chevelte, Cutlass, 
Mopars, Pontlac, Chevrolet, 
morel TRUCK PANS. FLOOR 
PANS. DOORS, FENDERS, 
BUMPERS. Now and Califor- 
nia. Rust tree. MARKS PLAT- 
ING & SUPPLY 217-824-6184. 

HOLLEY CARB, GREAT 

shape $75, Carter thermo- 
quad, off of 440: has not run in 
years, $25. Dual point distribu- 
tor for BB Chrysler, $25. Both 
flip up headlight doors for '69 
Charger, $25. Call after: 6pm 
(647)548-1115. 

■■nne* - amo aimb • lot - *©» - 

MDltrnUr*— P225/55ZR16, - ' 
$400.(815)675-6445. 

WESTERN PRO FLOW 
SALT SPREADER, used 1 . 
season, hitch mount tor newer 
Dodge pick-up, '5900/besl. 
1991 Ford Super Duty stake 
side truck, new . mo- , 
tor/brakesAlres/battery and al- 
ternator, 8ft. Western untm- 
ount snowplow, Western V- 
box salt spreader, 15,0001b. 
H.D. hitch, excellent condition, 
$19,000/best. 1992 Bobcat 
753 w/aux, hydraulics and 
snowplow, good condition, 
Sl1,000/best. 1989 Dodge 
Daytona Shelby, body in great 
condition, motor needs re- 
pairs, $1 ,000/besl. (847) 
837-9955. 



Vans 



-J 



For More 
Classifieds, 
See Page 5 



TRUCKS ARE 

ALL WE 
DO. 



(VANS AND SUVs, TOO) 




COMMERCIAL HEADQUAI 



Trucks help make your business go. Check our 
selection of commercial trucks, vans, stakes, and dumps. 




PARTIAL INVENTORY 

LIST OF USED VEHICLES, 

CALL FOR 

OTHER VEHICLES 



1988 FORD 1 TON DUMP 
1988 CMC 1 TON DUMP 
1985 CHEVY 1 TON DUMP 



CHEVROLET 1992 STEP 
VAN, 12ft. aluminum body, 6.2 
diesel, automatic, needs noth- 
ing, looks good, 90,000 miles, 
$5,950/best. $2,000 below 
wholesale. (414) 895-6576. 

CHEVY 1993 CONVER- 
SION VAN, $7,995. (647) 395- 
3600. 



CHEVY 1993 G20 CON- . 
VERSION VAN, LOADED, V 
$7,831.(847)244-1010. 

DOOGE s 1994 CARAVAN 
SE, met. red, 3.0 V6, A/C, cas- 
sette PW/PL, keyless entry, 
very clean, 82K, $6,255. (847) 
658-3074. ", 

DODGE 1995 CARAVAN, 
$7,995. (847) 395-3600. 



DODGE 1997 GRAND 
CARAVAN • SPORTY;, red, 
34,000 highway miles, extend- 
ed warranty, $17,900/best. 
(414)697r0661, 

FORD 1989 E-150 CARGO 
VAN, 6-cyllnder, air, power 
steering, $3,300. (414) 
697-9744 after 6pm, ask for 
Jeff. 




r -• 



1998 Savana 
Conversion Van 



USED CAR SPECIAL OF THE WEEK 

1996 GMC 1/2 TON SUBURBAN 

2X4, Vfl, AUTO. A/C, TRAILER PKC, LOW MILES 



$20,995 



^aS 9 0,9 ° /o *"" 3® n * onttls 

1999 with approved 2.9% for 48 months 

^Mcta ^y^fo 60 "write 



SELECTED USED CAR TRADE-INS 



1997 GMC 1 TON EXT. CAB DUALLY 

4X4454VB.ajto,aarioadea\ 

Docketsea£s,Tjaflerpkg '. 



SAVE 



1997 GMC t TON CREWCAB OUAiiY 

2X4, 45*. V8L auto. aar. Tiafer PVg. £AlfT 

txjdrise^baded.bbcfcbeaLfry....OMWC 



1996 PONTIAC 

g.fo..J10 T 99B 



1996 CHEW S10BLA2ER 



4K4.4door.V6 

A/C, loaded... 



$ 



15,900 



1996GMC1/2TON4X4 

V8,aj«Sl£w tAWC 

| w/glass cap, 18,000 cert mfes. . . ynv L | 



1996 S JIMMY 

4X4. 4door,V6. A/C. ioaded,$4 A JQC 
tow fries IQijtvu 



1995CHEV/S-10BLAZER 

««*■*■ $15,900 



lw0X|XwwfJ« 



!L* 



1995 CHEVY 1/2 TON SHORT BED 

SIDE $44 QftQ 



V3. auto. A/C Starado fa. 



Lji 



1995 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 

WC.toffriies Q\73v 



1994 MERCURY SABIE 0SS1S1 



1993GMCS JIMMY 

VGLtt4d045Upar*ar* $/{l|Q 
Auto, Ai, ieaiter, Evay Opfoi . . Opt! 






1993DODGEDAKOTA 

5 speed, ar 



5995 



1992.CHEVYLUMIHAAPV I 

V6, automatic,^, SCQQE 
7passenQer QjjJ 



1990GMC1TONEXICABDUALLY454 

budd^45,0Q0calfTte. .Hlwl}CL 



4 door, V6, automatic, 
air, M power 



$ 9495 



1989FORD RANGER 
4X4EXTXAB $ 

V&aJcmfa'ai...- 



3695 




PEDERSEN GMC TRUCK 

"The Truck People" mm\im 
ANTIQCH. IL • 847-395-3700 



Comers of RL 45 & 173 



■■ 




. 



--1 

■:■ 

v 

i 



■ 

&3 



. .- -vrtiVY.; ■ ; •• -"■ v-- • .-■■ 







January 1, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers I D5" 




"* 




:eto 



• «■' f wmm * ^ p «*• * •» * MM fl W» f MM f _ I — i 



MUST SELL. 1993 'VW-,Efe 

rovan, ' $17,000. (647): 
740-2064, , 

PLYMOUTH 1993 VOYAG- 
ER VAN, $7,990. (647) 223- 
B65t. ■ ■» . - 

PONTIAC 1992 s TRANS- 
PORT M1NIVAN, $6,995. 
(647) 362-9200. 

VW 1975 HIPPIE VAN 

$1,100, runs, camper, lou- 
varod wlndowa, In Zlon. (773) 
762-8733. 



Four Wied Drive 
Jeeps 



1984 CMC SUBURBAN 
4x4, Interior and exterior al- 
most mint, towing package 
S.OOOIbs., chrome 11 porfecl, 
,150Ki In from Texas 397,- only. 
1 year In anow, fresh 'transfer 
case and water pump,- 1 yoar 
old transmission, oil pump, 
front and rear seals, radiator, 
brakes and power steering 
pump.. Asking $7,000,. Must 
see. (847) 356-2490. ' 

1996 HONDA 4 TRAX 4X4, 
low, low miles, ; with plow, 
$4.500. (81 5). 653-941 3. 

CHEVY 1989 SUBURBAN 
4x4 6.2 dlesel 1500 Series. 
Please call for more" Info, 
$4,500/best. Loaded. (847) 
963-8295. - 

CHEVY .1991 S-10 BLAZ- 
ER, $5,995.(847) 244-1010. 

CHEVY 1S93 BLAZER 

2WD, $10,895. (847) 587- 
3300. 



CHEVY 1993 ■ BLAZER LT, 

$8,950. (847) 432-9300. 

CHEVY 199S BLAZER LS 
4x4. $12,990. (815) 385-2100. 

FORD 1968 BRONCO 4x4 
with Bft. unlmount. Western 
plow on H with '90,470 miles, 
with Double D big tires on It, 
$4,500. 1987 FORD RANGER 
with 109,858. miles, 5-speed 
plus reverse, $800. Call Jose 
(847) 487-1406. 

FORD 1986 . BRONCO, 



FORD 1990 BRONCO XLT. 

5.0L, V6/4WD, loadodV wllh 
anowplow, $5,000. (847) 
680-1065. 

FORD 1994 EXPLORER 
4x4. $13,990. (815) 385-2100. 

FORD 1998 EXPLORER 
EDDIE BAUER, groat condi- 
tion, perfectly maintained, 
64,000 miles, $16,900/best. 
(847) 395-2015. 

GEO TRACKER 1998, 

$9,990. (847) 223-8651'. 

GMC JIMMY S IE 1994, 
$12,995.(647)385-3600.. 

GRAND' CHEROKEE LAP* 
EDO .1994; $14,995. (847)' 
382-9200. . . ■ . 

ISUZU AMIQO- 1993, fully 
loaded, $5,500/best. (647) 
973-01 28 or voice mall" 1-800- 
255^4859.0X1.4689. 

JEEP CHEROKEE .1968, 
wllh plow, good runner, every-: 
thing In working order. Asking; 
$1.500.(847)872-1204, 

JEEP CHEROKEE LIMIT- 
ED .1998, .23,000 miles, excel- l 
lent condition, fully- loaded, 
"4W/ABS, * $20,000. (847) 
782-1395 after 5pm; . 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LTD. 1996. $22,595, (847) ..: 
- 362-9200. 

JEEP LAREDO CHERO- 
KEE 4x4, 1991, new 
tires/brakes. 4-door, alarm, 
CB radio,, remote 'starter, 1- 
owner, maintenance records, 
120K, like new $5,300. (630) 
372-1585. ■ 

JEEP WRANGLER 1990, 
$4,990- (847)' 223-6651. ' ■' 

NISSAN 1 1989 PATH- 
FINDER 4x4, with hitch, sun- 
. roof, $5,995/best. (647) 
356-0332.- -. 

TOYOTA 1991 PREVIA, 
$11,990. (847) 223-8651. 



CHEVY 1997 S-10 PICKUP, 
. extended cab, automatic, 2 
tone gray and blade, loaded, 
leather, CD, hitch. Much, 
much more. Still under warran- 
ty, 22,000 miles. $15,999. 
(847) 249-2825 ask for Mike. , 

DODGE 1992 DAKOTA LE 
EXTENDED CAB, $8,990. 
(815) 385-2100. 

DODGE 1996 DAKOTA 
'PICKUP, $13,990. (847) 223-. 
8651. 

FORD 1989 RANGER 4X4, 
$4,995.(847)587-3300. 

FORD 1991 F-150 "XLT 
PICKUP, stick, $6,200. (815) 
455-6765. 



FORD 1994 RANGER XL 

CKUP, $7,990. (647) 223 



Snowmobllcs/ATVi 




1987 SKI-DOO FORMULA 
PLUS, brand now track, extra 
pads, with cover, very good 
condition. 847) 973-0745; attor. 
5:30pm, (847) 774^8689. 

1995 ZRT800, PICKED, 

with cover, digital computer, 
$3,500, 4 place Leiand trailer, 
! drfve-on/drlva-dfT, with surge 
brakes,-' $700. (815) 
678-4301. 



SKIDOO'S 1969 MACH 1, 
$1,500. 1987 Formula Plus, 
$1,200. Great Sleds. (414) 
637-3667, 

SNOWBLOWER, TORO, 
SELF-PROPELLED, 4- 

speed, 2 stage, 2 lln. width, 
4hp, electric start. Small, easy 
to uso. Very good condition, 
$325. Others available. Wil- 
motle (847) 67$-4786 after 
5pm, 



SNOWBOARD NO L1MITZ 
Spec Ed 147 with Burton Cus- 
tom Free Style Bindings,' 
$300/besL(4t4) 662-2568. 

YAMAHA PHAZER 1986, 

good condition, excellent run- 
ner. $1,500/best. (815) 
728-0993; 





.ORD F-150 :1992, 6-cylin-: 
der, slick, wKh air, AM/FM casV 
sette, low ' -. mileage, 
$6,500/besL (847) 356-5949. 

NISSAN 1993 PICKUP,' 
$5,880,(847)223-8651. 

TRUCK WITH PLOW 1985 
GMC 4x4 plckupysSO V6, au- 
lomallcj . power steering j and 
brakes; dual. tanks, steer cap, 
western pro plow, some rust, 
asking $3,200.- * (414) 
877-2929. . 



Ileavy.Equlpmenl 



1988 MAC SUPERLINER 

400 Cat Engine, 510,000/best; 
'"Double ■ frame". (847) 
, '464-4371 .". 

IRRIGATION PUMP & (MO- 
TOR, model 6203A, 40hp.. 
phase 3. Peerless pump, 4ln. 
Ductal falanged, 20hp. motor. 
$650. (647) 740-738Or after 
5pm.- :^. 



Trucks/Trailers 



Wanted To Buy.. 



.{a471-3flS-3600 



! ~' ^-'-_'S^r- 



CHEVROLET ; 1995 S-10 
I PICKUP; $8,490.' (847) 223- 
.., 6651, . •■_..,■ ■ 



USED CARS AND TRUCKS. 

I 'Cars up to $300. Trucks'up to 

$500;- Running condition' p;e- 

^w^tarrad. (847) 7,40-4241 



te Gary Lang Auto Group has 
raised over $12;000 for Mark 
Bobowski, who recently was para- 
lyzed in_a swimming accident. The 
funds were raised by the sale of raf- 
fle tickets at the Gary Lang Auto 
Group and numerous other busi- 
nesses around McHenry County. 
The $12,000 helped Mark purchase a 
van and wheel-chair lift. 

"Gary Pierce was the lucky winner 
of the raffle drawing, a Classic 1971 ' 
Pontiac Lemans Covertible, present-. 
ed by Gary Lang Auto Group oh Sat- 
urday, December 12th at the dead- 
ership. 

Mark Bobowski,, before being in- 
jured worked at the Gary Lang Auto 
Center in McHenry. Gary Lang per- 
sonally added additional funds lat- 
er, after, employees at Gary Lang 
voted to cancel their Christmas par- 
ty, and donate the money ear- 
marked for the party to futher assist 
Mark's purchase of the van and 
wheel-chair Lift." 

Sfnce'.the accident* Mark has made 




..Gary Pierce, left is the lucky winner of a 
| 1971 Pontiac Lemans with proceeds 
; going to Mark ■•: Bobowski (center) as 
' Gary Lang (right) looking on. 

tremendous progress, and this event 
hopefully has helped toward his re- 
cover, Gary Lang said; 

For more information how to con- 
tinue your support of Mark, call the 
Gary Lang Auto Center at 815-363- 
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D6 /lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



January 1,1999 





~*s 











This year, at the hhnois Press Association Awards, 



-;*.' t 'ft 



:.f" 



•'V 







an arm load 
which is just one more 
you are 




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Quotes from 

NEWSPAPER DESIGN 

FIRST PLACE: 






SUNOS PR€SS 

— itiaocrt r io« 



~ 



^ 



NEWS STORY 

FIRST PLACE: 



LIFESTYLE SECTION 

FIRST PLACE: 



iBERff^ENEWO 






"nwailiiljtioluftx'il 




*■ °^- '. ■r'"" 'ii i | | ' ' ' "" rmilD 



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excellent choice of 
body copy and 
headline Fonts. Clean 
appearance, good use . 
of color overall. Ads . 
offer a variety of 
typography and art 
styles. Local news 
. attractively packaged 
and emphasized 
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out among the 
competition. 
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a staff who obviously 
cares about the 
r cornmunity!" 



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Jason I King, 
LeonFilas 

"Well-written, tells 
acompelingstory. 
Good use ofthe 
teacher's letter 
attempting to explain 
himself. Great job 
on a sensitive topic 
that must have had 
everyone in the ■"." 
community talking." 







*a?saefia 



«G5aB saa ft 4 ■ Tr^ 




Living Hislory 







Lakelife Sec Hon, 

"Very high quality; 
design is well thought 
out and clean; ; 
. Listings are broken 
upby mini-stories, 
good features arid 
columns." 








»«• ' tl.~. 



THIRD PLACE: 

• Editorial Cartoon — Tom Beck; 

• Agricnlture/BiMlncM Reporting- Raspberry preserves, 

'.. v >.. .' Elizabeth Eaken , 

• original Column— Life's a Bear, Donna Abear 



HONORABLE MENTION: 



•AgriciUtnre/Bustaess Reporting— ^ Farm home 

beats reaper, Kenneth Patchen 
• Feature Story— Executive Orders, LeonFilas. 
fW^iwnVhotogfmpf^^KellyATgbscop 

at a kiss..,, Sandy Bressner 



• Sports Story— Mr. 900, Brendan O'Neill 

• Sports Column— In the Trenches, 

Brendan O'Neill, LeonFilas 



January 1,1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



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LIFE'S ABEAR 

Madame Abear makes 
predictions for 1 999 / B4 



GARDEN JOURNAL 

New 1 999 gardening 
catalogues are in /B5 



MOVIE REVIEW 

Lakeland picks the best 
& worst of 1 998 / B5 



Lakeland 
Newspapers 



1999 




i;>U'v«*^» -t 



;ht*Jt 



Antloch resident Searle Wadley gets a jump start on the fitness season with the help of fitness trainer Ray Pelelas, owner 
of Team Fitness in Gumee.— flhoto by Sandy Bressner 



r - 

'When someone comes up to me and says they have dropped 

two clothing sizes, it's so exciting 




Fitness trainers use 'diverse talents to motivate clients 



By LESLIE PIOTROWSKJ 
Staff Reporter 



A popular New Year's reso- 
lution Is: "I'm really going 
to get in shape this year." 
One way to meet this goal 
is to find a fitness trainer who 
knows how to motivate and make 
exercise fun. 

Cindy Cassldy, a trainer with 
the Exercise Place of Grayslake, ap- 
plies her personal philosophy to her 
aerobics classes. 

"It's not good to work out to the 
point of pain, but to the point of fa- 
tigue/' she said. Cassidy maintains 
that working one's muscles to the 
point of capacity is the best way to 
build endurance and bum calories. 
In addition to her. aerobics classes, 
which focus on increasing the heart 
rate, she teaches a strength and 
conditioning class designed to build 
muscle mass, endurance, flexibility 
and range of motion. 

Her participants exercise to the 
beat of a wide range of music, in- 
cluding popular, International, reg- 
gae and Middle Eastern rhythms. 
Cassldy makes her own tapes. 



Her background is ideal for her 
profession. She was originally a bal- 
let dancer and was about to join the 
Milwaukee Ballet program when . 
she opted to go to graduate school 
for a master's degree in counseling. 
Now, she can apply her background 
in counseling to working with peo- ^ 
pie who lack motivation or self es- 
teem. 

"I apply the people skills I 
learned in school to help people feel 
comfortable," she said. 'I'm sensi- 
tive to people who feel rotten about 
their physical shape. I can help 
them feel like they can do some- 
thing about it." 

Ray Pelelas, a personal trainer 
and owner of Team Fitness In 
Gurnee, maintains it's important 
that clients see results in a short pe- 
riod of time. 

"Everybody wants to lose 10 
pounds overnight," he said. "That's 
unrealistic, but trainers do need to 
be efficient so clients see re suits 
quickly." 

When Pelelas gets new clients) 
he first focuses on building their en- 
ergy. 

"The key is blood flow," Pelelas 



said, "When you get the blood flow- 
ing to your muscles, it stimulates 
the whole system and you feel won- 
derful" 

His 60-minute sessions start out , 
with a general warm up of cardio- 
vascular exercises. Then he focuses 
' oh exercising major muscles such 
as legs, hips and abdominals. Final- 
ly he moves on to give arms, shoul- 
ders and feet a good work out. 
Rather than focusing on one area of 
me body, he works everything. 

Many of his clients suffer from 
chronic dysfunctions such as lower 
back, shoulder, neck and postural 
problems. He uses exercise and 
massage to strengthen and rebuild 
their bodies. 

"We see greater gains with our 
older clients/ ;sald Pelelas, whose 
customers range In age from 35 to 
80. "People assume that age makes 
' them less functional, but it has 
nothing to do with age. We re- 
strengthen people. We've seen 
clients get rid of walkers and canes," 

Exercise alone is not the answer 
to total fitness, Darla Ostrowski, a 

Please see HEW YOU/ A3 




:■*-< 






Personal trainer Darla Ostrowski spots Armando Duenas of Fox 
Lake with his weights during a training session at Fitness Works 
in Fox Lake.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



. ■«- - 



B2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



January 1,1999 








And the j udges ag 




This year, at the Illinois Press Association Awards, 

ers 







an arm load of honors 



g 
11 in all 




which is just one more accolade that tells us 
you are reading a quality product each week. 



Quotes from Best of the Press: 



aUJNOS PRESS 



IA9IOC1* IlOf 



NEWSPAPER DESIGN 

FIRST PLACE: 



NEWS STORY 

FIRST PLACE: 



LIFESTYLE SECTION 

FIRST PLACE: 



*^«m*h» iteM^s »■*!( 



LIBERT YVILLE NEWS 






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"Great layout, 
excellent choice of 
body copy and 
headline fonts. Clean 
appearance, good use 
or color overall. Ads 
offer a variety of 
typography and art 
styles. Local news 
attractively packaged 
and emphasized 
made this entry stand 
out among the 
competition. 
Congratulations to 
a staff who obviously 
cares about the 
community!" 



**f ■» Jl HH*I »m-1 



LIBERTY V1LLE NEWS 

LCI IS English tcnriiiT firwl 






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LCHS English 

teacherfired. 

Jason J. King, 

Leon Filas 

"Well-written, tells 
a compelling story. 
Good use of the 
teacher's letter 
attempting to explain 
himself. Great job 
on a sensitive topic, 
that must have had 
everyone in the 
community talking." 






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Lakelife Section 

"Very high quality; 
design is well thought 
out and clean. 
Listings are broken 
up by mini-stories, 
good features and 
columns," . 




THIRD PLACE: 

• Editorial Cartoon —Tom Beck 

..--'.■■-■■ 

• Agnculturie/BUBliiess Reporting— Raspberry preserves, 

Elizabeth Eaken 

• Original Column— Life's a Bear, Donna Abear 



HONORABLE MENTION: 



r 

• Agriculture/Business Reporting— Farm home 

beats reaper, Kenneth Patchen 

• Feature Story — Executive Orders, Leon Filas 

• Feature Photography— Kelly Argis scop 

at a kiss..,, Sandy Bressner 



• Sports Story— Mr. 900,-Brendan O'Neill ' 

• Sports Column— In the Trejiches, 

Brendan 6'NeUi, Leon Filas 





January 1, 1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers / B3 




t to celebrate 




Elvis Is In the building. Chicago-born trent 
Carlinl, the World's Greatest Elvis Stylist; will keep 
the music and memory of the King of Rock V Roll 
alive at the Rosemont Theatre, Jan. 9, In commem- 
oration of Elvis' 63rd birthday. The all-new produc- 
tion, Trent Cariini — An Elvis Birthday Celebration, " 
recreates the King's early rockabilly * • : - 

years, his famed '68 comeback con- 
cert, and the legendary "Aloha From 
Hawaii" special, complete with Elvis- 
like moments of hysteria-inducing - 
audience interplay. Joining Carlinl on 
stage will be Joe Esposito, a member 
of Elvis* entourage, and Al Dvorin, the 
life-long friend and booking agent of 
Elvis who originated the booming 
bravado, "Elvis has left the building." 

Cariini, a native of Chicago's Little Italy neigh- 
borhood, has made a name for himself not only on 
the Las Vegas Strip, but also around the world. Last 
year, he was voted the "Best Elvis Entertainer in the 
World" at a prestigious international competition 
juried by Presley intimates who gave Cariini perfect 
scores for his performance. Although Cariini bears 
an uncanny likeness.and sound to the King of Rock, 
he considers himself to be an Elvis stylist or 
"Presleyian artist," not an impersonator. 

• I've studied .'his music, style and fashion, , 
but I'm not interested; In Impersonafing.Elvis," 




explains Cariini. 
. Cariini's Las Vegas revue, The Dream King," 
continually packs the house at the Boardwalk 
Casino on the Strip, garnering two to three standing 
ovations a night and; like its namesake, regularly 
working audiences into a screaming frenzy. . 
' Cariini opens hts birthday celebra? 

\\ tipn with the rockabilly style of the 

I early Elvis. Then Carlinl begins his 
salute to his favorite Elvis era, the '68 
comeback. Then Cari[ni recreates 
Elvis' "Aloha from Hawaii" concert, 
and for the finale he is in a .remark- 
IP able replica of Elvis' trademark high- 
J collared,, bell-bottomed Jumpsuit, toss- 
ing his jeweled belt and cape to 
screaming, waiting fans, just as Elvis did during the 
televised 1973 ^concert 

■;■ The Rosemont Theatre is also registering people 
to win a trip for two to Las Vegas, including hotel 
accommodations, and tickets to see "The Dream 
King", at the Holiday Inn Casino Boardwalk. 
Participants must be 21 to enter. 

Trent Carlinl— An Elvis Birthday Celebration" is 
at the Rosemont THeatre, 5400 N. River Road, at 
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 9. Tickets are $29.95 and 
are available. at all Tlcketmaster locations at the 
Rosemont Theatre box office, or by calling (312) 
559-1212. 




Presleyian artist Trent Carlinl will recreate Elvis' legendary 
"Aloha From Hawaii" concert during his birthday tribute to 
the King of Rock and Roll on Jan. 9 at the Rosemont 
Theatre. For tickets, call (312) 559-1212. 



THEATRE 



Auditions set 

Highland Park Players will hold 
open auditions 7-10 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 



10 and Monday, Ian. 1 1 for its March 
production of "Five Women Wearing . 
The Same Dress," at the Highland Park 
Community House, 1991 Sheridan 
Road, Highland Park. 

Call-backs will be on Wednesday, ' 
Jan. 13. Parts are available for five : 



women (bridesmaids) ages early 20s to 
late 30s and one man in his late 20s. 
Actors will be asked to do cold readings 
from the script. , 

Performances will be held on - 

Please turn to next page 



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sJ-~~--' j" ~— ' L" " J* 1 * 



fSSSi -V ''*''■■' <'■#-] 



Aries -March 21 /April 20 
Don't jiold a 'grudge against a good 
friend, Aries. He or she may have ere- 
- ated-eproblem tor yourbtrt hl»;or her 
Tnferit/bns5wer61goocf. (Let r go\df ydur 
anger, and Work with him or; her to 
remedy the situation.- A loved one 
offers romantic • advice. Listen to 
what's being. said. It really can help. 

Taurus -April 21 /May 21 
Don't let the little things get to you this 
week/Take them in stride, and keep 
working hard. Your efforts will pay off 
by the weekend. That special some- ' 
one takes you' out for a night on the 
town 'this weekend. Enjoy yourself; 
you deserve it. Sagittarius plays an 
important role. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 
Things are looking up for you this 
week, Gemini. The stress of the past 
few days is gone, and you finally can 
relax. Take some time to catch up on 
the little things that you haven't been 
able to do — return phone calls, read 
the mail, straighten your; home, A 
close friend needs your advice about a 
personal problem. Be supportive. 

Cancer- June 22/July 22 
Calm down, Cancer. Don't get 
stressed out over a minor problem at 
work. It's not worth it. Just do what you 
can to improve the situation. That's all ■ 
anyone expects of you. A loved one 
talks to you about a potentially lucra- 
tive deal. Don't jump in feetfirst. Look 
at all of the pros and cons, 

Leo-July23/August23 

An old friend needs your help. Do what 
you can — even though the two of you 
fiaven't been very close lately. This sit- 
uation can bring you together again. A 
co-worker wants to introduce you to 
his or her good friend. Don't agree to 
it; it only will cause you a lot of 
headaches. Libra plays a key role late 
In the week. 

« 

Virgo- Aug 24/Sept 22 

Several people are depending, on you 
to get an Important project done this 
.week, Virgo, Don't, let them down, If 
you stay focused on your work arid 
don't get distracted by those around 
you, you'll finish everything oh time. A 
friend asks you for a favor, Don't auto- 
matically say yes, because he or she 



isn't telling the whole truth. . 

Ubra-Sep\23/6cl23 
^Ydu have a lot on your mind \W3YieeK:' 
~?,DonTkeep trail bottled 'up.'Tatfr to a * 
loved one or dose friend; He or she 
will- help you sort out your thoughts 
and make some -crucial decisions.' 
That special someone has a surprise 
for you on Friday. Enjoy! 

Scorpio- Oct 24/Nov 22 
Even though you're a loyal friend, , 
don'tjfe for someone close to you this 
week, Scorpio. You want, to protect 
him or her,' but -you can't. This person 
has to accept responsibility for what he 
or she has done. A loved one wants 
your help with a family matter. Do what • 
you can. Your efforts will be appreciate . 
ed. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
Don't let an argument with a toyed 
one get you down, Sagittarius. 
Neither one of you meant the things 
that you said; you both just had to let 
off some steam. The two of you will 
realize this by the week's end, and 
things will get back to normal. An 
interesting acquaintance asks you 
out. Say yes. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
Don't be shy when it comes to, meeting . ■ 
a business -associate -early In. the 
week. He or she really could enhance 
your financial situation. Just be your- 
self, and you're sure to make a good , 
impression. You 'meet an interesting 
stranger while out with a friend. Don't 
. leave without getting his or her num- 
ber, This could be the one". 

Aquarius - Jan 21/Feb 18 
When it comes to your to-do list this 
week, be realistic. You, know how 
. much you can handle'and how much is 
too much. Don't be afraid to ask for. 
help. A family friend asks for your input' 
on a personal problem. Do what you 
can, and be supportive. Virgo plays a 
key role. 

Pisces- Feb 19/March 20 

>■ Keep your sense of. humor as things 
'get hectic this week, Pisces. There's a 

lot going' on, and you're caught In the 
' middle of everything. Remember, to 

laugh at the absurd, and things will be 

better than you expect. 



B4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 1, 1999 



March 12, 13, 19, 20 at B p.m. and on ■ 
March 14 and 21 at 2 p.m. "Five Women 
Wearing (he Same Dress" Is directed by 
Donna Lubow and produced by Nancy 
Strelfler. For more Information, call 604- 
4771. , 

FAMILY EVENTS 



Family fun-line 

Chicago -area residents and visitors 
can now dial the new Free Family Fun 
Line to find quality activities and events 
available frcc-of-charge to the public, 
provided byTicketUne Ltd. 

The Free Family Fun line, which 
can be reached 24 hours a day by calling 
(312) TICKETS, Is the only phone line 
that exclusively lists free Chicago-area 
activities with appeal for all members of 
the family. Most are educational or cul- 
tural In nature. The listings are changed 
doily . Callers will be charged normal : 
toll charges to downtown Chicago. 



MUSIC 



Concert series 

The Lake County Community 
Concert Association has revealed an 
exciting line-up of world class perform- 
ers for its 1998-99 series. 

The 1998-99 season Includes the 
following: Lee Lcssack and Joanne 
O'Brien— An Enchanted Evening: The 



Music of Broadway, Sunday, Jan. 10, 3 
p.m.; Jan Gottlieb Jlracek, pianist, 
Sunday, March 14, 3 p.m.; and. 
Vancouver Wind Trio (bassoon, oboe 
and clarinet), Sunday, April 18 at 3 p.m. 

Tickets are sold only for the entire 
series. Ticket holders are entitled to 
attend eight additional concerts at two 
other Community Concerts locations In 
Arlington Heights and Park Ridge. 

All LCCCA's concerts will be held in 
Orlln Trapp Auditorium at Waukegan 
High School, Brooksideand McAree. 

■ For tickets, call Donna at 244.-7465. 

Ensemble opening 

City Lights Is a vocal ensemble that 
sings a variety of music mom the 1930s to 
the present, and has been singing around 
the Chicago I and area for several years, 
entertaining audiences of ell ages. City . 
Lights has in Its repertoire a variety of 
songs and medleys guaranteed to enter- 
tain and also boasts of Its fine soloists. 

This renowned musical group Is 
opening its roster for the first time to 
the general public for new members. 
Limited openings remain for the men's 
and women's sections. If you love to 
sing and have fun doing it, call Kim at 
526-7190 or Al at 623-1946. 



MUSIC 



Dream Date Auction set 

The Midwest Chapter of the 



Starlight Children's Foundation will 
present its 8th annual Dream Date 
Auction on Friday, Feb. 19, at 6 p.nr, at 
' the Park West, 322 W. Armltagc In 
Chicago. V: 



The event will feature the auc- 
tion of 26 bachelor and bachc- 
lorettcdate packages, food from ' 
over 30 of Chicago's favorite restau- 
rants and a raffle and auction offer- 



ing International, deluxe trip pack- 
ages. Cost is $30 In advance, $35 at 
the door. To order tickets or for 
more Information, call (312) 251- 
7827. 



FRD|PAGEB1 

NEW YOU: Fitness trainers 
use talents to motivate clients 



personal trainer at Fitness Works In 
Fox Lake, not only helps her clients' 
get in shape through weight lifting 
and cardiovascular exercises, she 
helps them change their diets. 

"Diets are an important part of 
personal training," she said. 

She encourages her clients to 
write down all they eat for one 
week and then goes over the list 
with them and decides what to 
change. 

"It makes a big difference when 
you see exactly what you eat on 
paper," she said. 

At 37, she maintains her 5' 2" 
116-pound build through an 
impeccable diet. A typical breakfast 
includes egg whites with fat-free 
cheese, salsa and coffee. Lunch fea- 



, tures a chicken breast with low fat 
cottage cheese, an apple and water. 
Dinner features another chicken 
breast, steamed vegetables, cottage 
cheese or a sweet potato. She never 
uses butter but adds flavor through 
spices. 

She occasionally cheats. "I have 
to cheat one meal a week to keep 
my sanity," she said. 

Ostrowskl became interested In 
healtJi and nutrition wbJle.woridng- 
for her sister, a naprapath. She also 
has always enjoyed sports and is a 
coach for girls' track at Antioch 
High School; She taught aerobics in 
Schaumburg and Antioch prior to 
corning to Fox Lake. 

."•Most fitness trainers will agree ; 

. that a challenging part of their job 



is keeping their clients inspired 
until their efforts really pay off. 
Their own enthusiasm Is key to 
motivating their clients. 

"I always go In feeling good arid 
conveying energy,", said Mitzi 
Miller, an aerobics trainer wiuV 
Ultimate Body Health and Racquet 
Club of Antioch. 'When they see 
my energy and attitude, it rubs' off." 

The high point for trainers Is 
when their clients finally see the 
outcome of their hard work. 

"When someone comes up to 
me and says they have dropped two 
clothing sizes, It's so exciting," 
Miller said. . 

But It takes time. Serious exer- 
cisers can expect to see a change in , 
three months. By six months, they 
can see a big difference. 

The main thing is keeping the 
exercises fun. "I encourage people 
to enjoy what they're doing," said , 
Miller. "No one wants to do some- 
thing they hate."- 






Madame Abear's got a psychic line on '99 



Ybu know how ridiculous it 
always seems when you visit 
a store in January, and - 
despite the wind chill of 10 
below zero outside, the store man- 
nequins are already decked out in 
sunglasses, thongs and a black beret? 
That's how goofy book publish- 
ers are looking these days as they 
prematurely rush books to market 
with titles like "The Century," "The 
American Century, " and even "A 
Century of Golf (this is probably 
the most accurate title, because the 
last time I watched a golf game on 
TV, it seemed like a century). 

Apparently, while we were out 
last night celebrating and singing, 
"We're going to party like it's 
1999...," the book publishers were 
out last night celebrating and 
singing, "We're going to party right 
on past 1999." 

Granted, it's not only the book 
publishers who would like to skip 
1999 - I'm sure many of you would 
like to skip it, too - or at least the 
Senate impeachment proceedings 
and the accompanying "LARGE 
CAPITAL LETTERS AND EXCLA- 
MATION POINTS IN THE 
MEDIA!!!!" - but last time I looked, 
the year had only just begun. 
(Although, for those of you still see- 
ing double this morning, today is 
Jjaanriuuaarryy 11, 119999.) 

And while you party animals 
may be seeing double, I, Madame 
Abear, long-time psychic for the 
gullible and easily conned, am see- 
ing a whole lot more than that. I 
am seeing the future: 

MADAME ABEAR'S 
1999 PREDICTIONS 

1. That's "Madame Abear's 
Predictions for the YEAR 1999", not 
1,999 predictions. What did you 
expect for $.75? 

2. The year 1999 will happen in 
its entirety, unless Saddam Hussein 
ever finishes that book he's been 
reading, "Chemical Warfare for 
Dummies." 

3. Monica Lewinsky will get her 
own talk show. It will be called "The 
liars Club," and her theme song will 
be, "Thing...thing a thong...make a 
scandal to last your whole life 
long., .don't worry that it will make 
the news from now -to who knows 

I when...just thing. Thing a thong." 

4. Bill Gates, in danger of losing 
his fight against the Justice 
Department, will fire all of his attor- 
neys and hire JohnnyCochran,' who 

. will get Mr. Gates and Microsoft ... .. 
acquitted by playing the "filthy rich ' 
'geek" card. 

5. The NBA lockout will go on 




LIFE'S 

ABEAR 



#» Donna Abear 



all season. Several NBA stars will 
stage a "SPOILED ROTTEN-AID" 
telethon, trying to raise money to 
support themselves'in the ridicu- 
lously lavish style to which they've 
become accustomed. It will 
include such entertainment (?) as 
Dennis Rodman getting married on 
the air (and five minutes later hav- 
ing the marriage annulled), and 
Latreii Sprewell choking the "LiT 
Penny" doll. Unfortunately, their 
efforts go unrewarded - total dona- 
tions received include $12, a violin, 
and 450 bottles of Grey Poupon. 

6. Larry Flynt, buoyed by the 
results of his first successful foray 
into the political arena, will start a 
second magazine: "Huckster." It 

■ will not be pornographic; it will, 
however, be about sex. 

7. Dreamworks Studios, after 
the success of "Prince of Egypt, " will 
continue their trend of serious ani- 
mation movies for kids based on reli- 
gious concepts. Next up: "Adam 
and Eve." Leonardo DiCaprio will be 
the voice of Adam, Kate Winslet the 
voice of Eve, and the voice of the 
snake will be provided by a 
Hollywood newcomer, Linda Tripp. 

8. Torn Hanks will change his 
name to Jimmy Stewart II. 

9. Thanks to protests by the 
radical "Citizens Against Tree 
Denting" group, skiing politicians 
will be banned from the slopes. 

10. Yet another journalist will 
be accused of "making things up" 
in his writings, However, taking a 
tip from Bill Clinton and Bill Gates, 
he Will defend himself by saying, 
"that depends on what your defini- 
tion of 'making things up' Is." ; 

11. Yes, Bob Dole will become 
. spokesman for the drug Viagra in 

1999. Not to be outdone, Barbara 
Bush will become spokeswoman 
forNo Nonsense Knee-Highs. 

12. Police will at first be baffled 
in their attempts to catch a serial 
toy killer whom the media will . 
nickname, "The Furby Silencer." 
The only evidence found to link 
these crimes together are a few 
strands'of red hain By year's end, 

' however, a witness named "Oscar" 
will come forward to name the per- 

• petrator: Tickle Me Hmo. Rosie 
i O'Donnell will claim that Elmo was 
with her.' On the little red muppet's 



first day in court, he will be cited for 
contempt due to his inability to 
quit giggling. 

13. Clinton,'America's "imp," 
will not be impeached by the 
Senate. He wUl be impugned, 
impaled, and impaired, but he will 
not be impeached. 

14. India will continue their 
underground nuclear testing, and 
Saddam Hussein will get his hand 



JH ;' 



slapped by'thetJ.N. for attempting 
to import radioactive sacred cows 
from India. 

, 1 15. The media will conduct a 
poll, and the public will vote on 
whether the media's most-used 
word in 1999 was "millennium" or 
"sex." The winner will, of course, 
be "sex." , -,— • 

•Well, dear readers, Madame 
Abear has to go take a nap now. 

■ ■- v. • ■* >'-+) ■*- : ' \'H V ' "• ■ 



Happy New Year, and remember 
to call me at 1-900-PSYCHE-ME 
or E-mail me at madame@psy- 
chic.con for all your psychic, 
needs In 1999. 



Questions or comments for 
humorist Donna Abear can be sent 
to Lakeland Newspapers, 30 S, 
Whitney Sti, Grayslake,IL 60030, 



-— v' ^ is IW 9 ,BU ..a di*<» ,,,,IS ' 







Lakeland Newspapers 



ynamite 

muig.es: 

iscounts 



CS4fcy> 74Q-4Q35 

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The 3D card is valued at over $150 and is full of money 

saving discounts!! Supplies are limited, 

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(.'lumM 1 One: 
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j <lra>sl;ike Times 
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J l.nki* Villa Record 
_| l.ilicrh \ille News 
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_| Round Lakf News 
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January 1, 1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers / 



Lake 





and worst of 1998 



The end of the year marks the 
beginning of the Oscar season— 
with alt the hype and predictions 
leading up to the Academy Awards. 

That said, Lakeland Newspaper's 
movie critics have made a list of the 
best and worst of the silver screen in 
1998; a list that rates, the movies that 
the everyday movie-goer has seen, 
or at least heard of, from the past 
year. 

■ 

Best Picture 

1. Saving Private Ryan 

2. Enemy of the State 

3. The Truman Show 

4. Rounders 

5. There's Something About 
Mary 

6. Out of Sight 

7. Meet Joe Back 

8. Pleasantville 

9. The X-Files 
lO.Armaggedon 

Worst Picture 

1. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas 

2. The Avengers 

3. Vampires 

4. Dark City. 

5. Studio 54- 

Best Actor 

torn Hanks— Saving Private 
Ryan 

Worst Actor 

Daniel Baldwin— Vampires 

Best Supporting Actor 

Gene Hackman— Enemy of the 
State' . 

Best Actress 

Cameron Diaz^-There's Some- 
thing About M ary 

Worst Actress 

LTma Thurman— the Avengers 

Best Supporting Actress 

Joan Allen — Pleasantville 




.--■ — ■*.-** .5 -*«,.. Worst Movie About A Killer As- 

movie review «=<■«»<« 

Deep Impact 

Best Animated Bug Movie 

- A Bug's Life 

Worst Animated Bug Movie 

Antz 




IMM1 

John Kmitia 
& Brendan O'Neill 




Brendan O'Neill and John 
Kmitta clean up well Tor the 
Lakeland's Best and Worst 
Movie Awards for 1998.— Pno- 
to Illustration 



Biggest Bype/Blggest Hop 

la. Godzilla 
'lb. Beloved 
Least Hypc/BIgg«rt Surprise 

There's Something About 
Mary 

Best Movie No-one Saw 

Very Bad Things 

Worst Movie Everyone Saw . 

Godzilla 
Best Movie About A 
Killer Asteroid 

Armaggedon 



TTASSICfflCINEMA! 



[847-973-2800 Rcg ..dvit$ 
115 Lakeland Pla 10 olicr 5 pm 
Juntt'ion olHte. 133 4 Bollini Rd. fox lake 



E ' ' Gaasn nTW^PffffWTW^ 



5H0WTIMES - FRIDAY, JAM. 1 
THRU THURSDAY, JAM. 7 

A BUG'S LIFE (0 

DIGITAL ■ Prl. 7:10 9:15 

5at 12:05 2:20 4:35.7:10 9:15 

PATCH ADAMS* (pg is) 

DIGITAL Fri. 6:55 9:25 

Sat. 1:30 4:106:55 9:Z5 

RUGRATS (0) 

Fri.-5at. 12:25 2:25 4:40 

STAR TREK 9 (po) 

Fri.-Sat. 7:15 9:30 

PRINCE OF EGYPT ( pg) 

Prl. 7:20 9:20 

Sat 12:15 2:30 4:45 

7:20 9:20 

YOU'VE GOT MAIL* (m 

Fri. 7:00 9:35 
5at. 1:20 4:00 7:00 9:35 

•Ho passes or coupons 

5UI1.-THUR5. 

CALL THEATER 
F0R5H0WTIME5 

u a r ^nsun i i«fl»dna>*dlcR'rtliJBOttti*n«ftPll| 



Best "Gui Movie" 

City of Angels 

Best "Guy Movie" 

Blade 

Best Girl Movie Masquerading 
as aGuy Movie 

* MeetJoeBlack 



Top:' "Saving Private Ryan" 
was the Best Picture in Lake- 
land's Best and Worst of. 
1998. The picture may earn 
Tom Hanks his third Oscar. 
Above: "Fear and Loathing in 
Las Vegas" starring Johnny 
Depp represented the worst of 
1998. 



ShowPlace8 

VERNON HILLS 

Milwaukee Ave»2nd Light S of (ED 

3 847/247-8958 &_ 



ALL SEATS s 2?° FBI & SAT 

s 1. 50 Sun thru Thurs 



Showtimes ForThun., I2/3I ThmThm., Ill 
*Thurs,-Sun Matinees in [Brackets] 

RUSH HOUR (PG-I3) 

f* | :30 *3;45J 6:50 9:20 .DIGITAL 

THERE'S SOMETHING 
ABOUT MARY (R) 

[*I:I0 *4:05] 7:20. 10:00. DlGrTAL 

PRACTICAL MAGIC (fe 13) 

[*1:50 *4:20] 7:30 9:50 . DIGITAL 

THE SIEGE (R) 

[*I:I5 +3:50] 7:40 10:15 DIGITAL 

BABE; PIG IN THE CITY (G) 
[♦100 *4:I0] .6:40 9:00, DIGITAL 

MEET JOE BLACK (PG-13) 
[* 1 2:30] 4:00 ,-8:00 DIGnAL 

ANTZ (PG) 

i [*2:|0 *4:3Q] 6:45 9:30 DIGITAL 

URBAN LEGEND (R) 

. 1*1:20 *4:I5] 7:00 10:10 DIGITAL 
Iwiikoumwbrtiit wwwJowo»«xom 



_'tll .1)1 P .)J<-U' 1 .V 

All v- 

fjl jllAL bGU f .Q 



New Catalogues for 

9 are here 





I hope your holidays were great, 
and the New Year brings you 
happiness and good health. Now 
that the holidays are past, we can 
get back to the regular everyday rou- 
tine. I for one, am looking forward to . 
relaxing and preparing for the garden 
next year. I do a lot of preparing in my 
mind for the next season during the 
winter months. 

Winter is the prime time for plan- 
ning your garden, deciding what you 
will plant, and this, of course, is the 
time for all the gardening companies 
to send out the new 1999 catalogues. I 
was browsing through the Park Seed 
catalogue, and have found some new 
and improved flower and vegetable 
seeds that I would like to try. I have 
been ordering seeds from Park for 
about 10 years now, and have found 
them to be a great Source of unusual 
varieties and reliable seeds. 

Among the vegetable seeds to be 
introduced this year is the Super 
Greygo II Hybrid— this new hybrid 
bears jumbo peppers (5 inches' tall by 
3 inches wide) that are sweet and 
thick walled. Ifs deeply ridged exteri- 
or, produces lovely flower shaped 
rings that are perfect for garnishes 
and relish trays. 

A hew Gourmet Romaine lettuce; 




i:v 



:-!. | 




OURNAL 



LydiaHuff 



beautiful. It's flowers are of the softest 
lilac-blue composed of petals of deli- 
. care beauty, featuring a white throat 
and picotee edge. The six to eight foot 
vines sport an attractive variegated fo- 
liage. Begins blooming in midsum- 
mer, much earlier than other vari- 
eties. 

A hew Sunflower, Crimson 
Thriller, caught my eye. I would like to 
grow it among the usual gold sun- 
flowers this year. It produces 6 inch 
blooms of vibrant, rich colors includ- 
ing bronze, crimson, russet and other 
red tones. Plants grow a manageable 
five to six feet tall ideal for the back of 
the border, planted next to outbuild- 
ings, or used as a screen. 

Also, new this year is a cascading 
snapdragon. Snapdragons have been 
growing in my garden for many, 
many years, A trailing snapdragon will 



be a must, I can imagine it growing in 
Freckles will add interest to any salai a flower box in a sunny spot This 



In fact, Freckles is currently the rage 
in many fine restaurants. It has un- 
usual beautiful leaves of fine char- 
treuse deeply splattered and flecked 
with burgundy. Harvest the tender 
leaves all season long. 

. Parks also has a sweet pepper va- 
riety mix that offers purple, red, or- 
ange, white, brown, yellow and green 
peppers all in one pack. They are a 
combination of the sweetest peppers 
available, without buying a packet of 

,eacr^]^tic^.DSAUit^eoq«n^iY^^a> 
.this way you can try different van- . 
elies, arid it is fun tosecwtiich do the 
best in your garden, and which you 
prefer for look and flavor. . 

They also carry my favorite cii- . 
cumber to grow, which Is a all-season 
burpless hybrid This cucumber is a 
seedless, burpless and super early va- 
riety. The fruits are 8 1 /2 inches long 
by 1 1/2 inches wide, and they are 
sweet, crisp and have no bitter flavor. 
They have proved to be a favorite in 
my home every year that we have 
grown them. Tliey are easy to grow, 
they do not need bees to grow and if 
grown away from any other variety of 
cuke they will be entirely seedless. 

Morning Glories have been one of 
my favorite flowers, for their vining 
habit and also their sharp blue and 
purple hue. Parks has many varieties ■ 
to choose from, this year they have in- 
troduced one Blue Silk, that looks , 



snapdragon also has a fruity perfume 
which will make it even more desir- 
able to grow' on the back deck. The 
mix includes white, yellow, pink, or- 
ange, scarlet, violet, and a pink-and- 
whltebicolor. 

To order a Parks Seed Catalogue, 
just call (800) 845-3369. Enjoy the 
New Year and have fun planning for 
next season. Until next time, peace. 



Gandm questions maybe sent to.\ t 
- Gar^nJoumarcfdlJicelahdNem^. 
papers, 30SCWhitney St., GrtryslaJbe, IL 
60030. 




'NOFAUUOK 

MOVIIFUN 
TKKHS 
yDKHTAl 



STADIUM UATINO 

AVMUIUINAU 

AUDTTOfJUMJ 




HO CHIMIN UN0I I * K* »•• MID MOVIIt 
SMMfflMl AVMASU « • ■*» mareu*#ot.i cot 



Lakeland 

Newspapers is 

interested to 

hear news of 

i 

local 

Events,Clubs, & 

Organizations. 

Please send news 
items to: 

Rhonda Hetrlck 

Burke 
30 S. Whitney St 
Grayslake, 60030 

Tel. 223-8161 
Fax 223-8810 

Photos arc 
also welcome. 



EGAL 



CINEMAS 

www.regalcinemas.com 



TWO DAY 

ADVANCED 

TICKETS 



ROLLINS CROSSING 18 



GURNEE 



I-94 A Grand Ave. Well 
847 151-9940 



Rofiir.s Rd tJiwn Hi 9J 4 CctfJJi L.ike H 
BARGAi*. VATir.fF^ »U S"OV.S START' 



Call 
Theater 

For 

Shows 

And Times 



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Sc. idiom Scitinj' 

in ALL Ainli ( in mm-. * 




No T'jbsi 



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« j ' i m ■ m < F ^"i 



I ■' I ■■-— --■— ■ ■ . ■ „ -,- 



B6 /Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



January 1, 1999 



January 1,1,999 



■ 
1 



HOT SPOTS 



Lakeland News, 



B7 




ADVERTISEMENT 



Tang's Chinese Restaurant 



Location: 
1 1 1 S. Hwy. 45, 
Schoolhouse Plaza, 
Grays lake 

Telephone: 
(047) 548-8882 

Hours: 

Open seven days a 

week: Monday to 

Thursday, 1 1 :30 a.m. 

to 9 p.m., Friday and 

Saturday, 1 1:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Sunday, 2:30 to 9 p.m 

Menu: 

Carry-out, dine-in and delivery. Finest Chinese 

cuisine served in the area 



Tdng's 






r Chinese Restaurant 







List your favorite HOT SPpTS restaurant for our 
monthly drawing to win a ^25 gift certificate. 



Address: 



Wffi 



City/State/Zip: 
Phone: 



Favorite Restaurant; c ^ 









Mail to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 

Gray slake, IL 60030 



r i.*rjy 






Advertise your business in Lakeland's 
Award-Winning Publication 




coming in February; 1999! 

Call (847) 223-8161 to speak with an 

advertising sales representative. 




Tite Best Chinese Food 

In The Area,.. 

And Our Customers 

Are The Critics 



HAPPY 

NEW 

YEAR!. 



Plenty of Free Parking 

• Dine In • Carry Out • Cocktails 

The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 

111 S. Hwy. 45 Gray slake 

(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 

FREE DELIVERY -CALL FOR DETAILS 





Jesse $aks 

847-223-2575 

18490 W. Old Gages Lake Rd. 
Gages Lake 

LIVE 

Reservations Accepted 




*-^« 






Gray slake Piggly Wiggly 

815 Center Street (847) 223-1560 



The "Pig" Knows How To Party... 



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Order Your Holiday 
Party Trays Now From Our Deli: 

• Cold Cut, Cheese, $ *fl ^99 
Vegetable Trays 
12- - 14" - 16" - 18" $ *J* 1^99 

(Seakxxi cc Spedafty Tray Aho Avafiabie) 



35 



Tang's Chinese Restaurant is celebrating the start of its 
third year in business and now there is no doubt that it is 
the most popular Chinese Restaurant in Lake County;/ 

Owner Peter Tang has had the goal of offering the best 
Chinese dining focusing on freshness, quality food, service 
and the most»Value for the money without compromises. 
This increaseiiri popularity has ensured that Tang's staff is 
working harder to please their many customers, offering the 
best service possible. 



Tang wants to thank all the loyal customers that come 
from all over the county and from as far away as 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Tang's Chinese Restaurant is easily accessible, located 
at 11 IS. Hwy. 45 in the Schoolhouse Plaza, in Grayslake. 
There ts plenty of free parking in front of the restaurant. 

Tang is presently busy working to come up with many 
new authentic Chinese. dishes to add to his fantastic menu, 
with new dessert items to be featured this summer. 



Tang's spacious dining room is available for private par- 
ties, with seating up to 80 people. Make your reservations 
early so that you and your guests can experience the adven- 
ture of dining on Tang's delicious Chinese cuisine together. 

Tang's is open/seven days a week, Monday through 
Thursday, from iy.30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday and Saturday 
from 11:30 a.m v to1 p.m. and Sunday, from 2:30 to 9 p.m. 
Dine-in, carry-out and delivery are available. Call today at 
(847) 548-8882. 



H A V.* ■"''!' 






MONACO 



Fine Foods - Cocktails 

2816 Rt. 120 • McHemy, IL 60050 

(815)385-5278 





Home of McHenry's 

Best Burger 



Dinner-Special every Sunday night 
accompanied with, music by 





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MAIN STREET STATION 

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Located In the Old C&NW Train Depot 

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385^4110 

^iious-.ADPetlzc>s,l. * 

DriWlrapcclols All. Week 

LuriCrrj& Dinner Specials Mon.-Frl. 




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ONE FREE 1/2 PITCHER OF MARGARITA 

Frozen or Regular 

•Strawberry -Regular 'Other Flavors 

Alcohol or nonalcoholic available 

With purchase of 2 lunches or dinners. One coupon per customer. 
Wot valid with any other coupon. Expires 1/8/9-.. 




Provides Lavish Quality, 

Friendly, Professional Service 

and Affordable Elegance 

Call Randy to Book 
Your Event Today 

(847) 223-6900 

l ife 54 S. Seymour Downtown Grayslake^ . * 





of china 

The Finest in Mandarin and Szechwan Cuisine 

Elegant Dining with a Casual Atmosphere 



Sunday Buffet! 



layr 

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11:30-2:30 

2 Soap*, 6 Appetizers, 

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Business; 
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5572 Grand Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031 

Phone (847). 662-2929 • Fax (847) 662-6099 

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ALL YOU CARE TG EAT 

FISH FRY $5.95 
GCHLL CRAB LEGS $1 6.95 

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2 1/2 Miles West of RL 59 OpenMon.-Thurs. 1 lam- Midnight; Fri.&Sat. 1 1am-3am; Sunday 8am-Mjdnighi 





- 



B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



January 1, 1999 



January 1,1999 



HOT SPOTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B7 




ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Location: 

11 1 S. Hwy. 45, 

Schoolhouse Piaza, 

Grayslake 

Telephone: 
<847) 548-8882 

Hours: 

Open seven days a 

week: Monday to 

Thursday, 1 1 :30 a.m. 

to 9 p.m., Friday and 

Saturday, 1 1:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Sunday, 2:30 to 9 p.m. 

Menu: 

Carry-out, dine-in and delivery. Finest Chinese 

cuisine served in the area 



Tang's Chinese Restaurant 

's 






se Restaurant 




Tang's Chinese Restaurant is celebrating the start of its Tang wants to thank all the loyal customers that come Tang's spacious dining room is available for private par- 
third year in business and now there is no doubt that it is from all over the county and from as far away as .ties, with seating up to 80 people. Make your reservations 
the most popular Chinese Restaurant in Lake County. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. early so that you and your guests can experience the adven- 

Owner Peter Tang has had the goal of offering the best Tang's Chinese Restaurant is easily accessible, located ture of diningon Tang's delicious Chinese cuisine together. 

Chinese dining focusing on freshness, quality food, siervice at 111 S. Hwy. 45 in the Schoolhouse Plaza, jn Grayslake. Tang's is openyseyen days a week, Monday through 

and the most value for the money without compromises. There is plenty of free parking in front of the restaurant. Thursday, from -1 -J ?30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday and Saturday 

This iricreasejjri popularity has ensured that tang's staff is . Tang is presently busy working to come up with many from 1 1 :30 a.m v tol6 p.m. and Sunday, from 2:30 to 9 p.m. 

working harderto please their many customers, offering the new authentic Chinese. dishes to add to his fantastic menu, Dine-in, carry-out and delivery are available. Call today at 



with new dessert items to be featured this summer. 



(847) 548-8882. 






;^-.^;;.r,-;-,. 

■, 




*U; 



List your favorite "HOT- ^^SROTS restaurant for bur 
monthly drawing tq:wina^25 gift certificate. 



Name: 



■ 
. ■ •■*, 



Address: 



City/State/Zip: 
Phone: ' 



'.A, .it 



ni 



A^j^C*V'- 



*-..-- ■ :<^^ 



Mail to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

R&Bpx 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 



tjrjt 






Advertise your business in Lakeland's 
Award-Winning Publication 



FOREF 




coming in February, 1999! 

Call (847) 223-8161 to speak with an 

advertising sales representative. 




Tfte Best Chinese Food 

In The Area... 

And Our Customers 

Are The Critics 



HAPPY 

NEW 

YEAR' 



Chinese Restaurant 



Plenty of Free Parking 

• Dine In ♦ Carry Out • Cocktails 

The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 

111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake . 

(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 

FREE DELIVERY -CA LL FOR DETAILS 



MONACO' 

Fine Foods - Cocktails 
2816 Rt 120 • McHenty, IL 60050 

(815)385-5278 




Ob Home of McHenry's 



; 







" ."■ '. ■ ■ ' " ■■■- ■- ; 



Dinner Special eyery Sunday. night 
accompanied with music by 



ow«wn*w 







<■ 



fc&4Sa 




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MIDWESTERN 
REGIONAL 

Keeping Well Club 
helps prevent cancer 

Keeping well and living long are 
among the greatest pleasures in life. 
Helping you keep well Is what the 
Keeping Well Club is all about. It's a 
membership program for people 
who are concerned about cancer. It 
costs nothing to join, but the bene- 
fits are tremendous: 

• Annual low cost mammogram 

• Annual prostate cancer 
screening (PSA blood test and digi- 
tal exam) 

• Annual low-cost cancer 
screening physical 

• Classes and workshops on nu- 
trition, mind-body medicine, and 
many other subjects 

• Quarterly newsletter on can- 
cer prevention, detection and treat- 
ment 

• Computerized personal histo- 
ry and lifestyle questionnaire which 
determines your cancer risk and 
what you can do to lower it 

The Keeping Well Club is a free 
service of Cancer Treatment Cen- 
ters of America. More than 500 men 
and women from northeastern Illi- 
nois and southeastern Wisconsin 
are currently members. 

To learn more about the pro- 
gram and to receive a member- 
ship application, call the Cancer 
Resource Center at 1-800-940- 
2822. 

Mammograms 
offered for $49 

For just $49, women can have 
mammograms performed— includ- 
ing reading and interpretation by a 
Board-certified radiologist — at 
Midwestern Regional Medical Cen- 
ter, 2520 Elisha Ave., Zion. 

A mammogram can help detect 
cancer before you can see or feel 
anything. Our caring and conscien- 
tious imaging specialist wilt fully 
explain the procedure, answer 
questions, and complete the mam- 
mogram, usually in less than 30 
minutes. Results from your mam- 
mogram will be sent to your per- 
sonal physician. 

For more information, or for an 
appointment call Midwestern at 
731-4100. Medicare, commercial 
insurance, credit cards and person- 
al checks are welcome. 

LAKE FOREST 
HOSPITAL 

Alzheimer's 
Support Group 

Lake Forest • Hospitals 
Alzheimer's Support Group, for 
those who care for Alzheimer's pa- 
tients, will meet at a new time, from 
7 to 8 p.m. The group meets the first 
Tuesday of each month in the li- 
brary at Westmoreland Nursing 
Center, on the Lake Forest Hospital 
campus, 660 N.Westmoreland Rd„ 
Lake Forest. 

The group provides psycho- 
logical support fort hose with a 
loved one suffering from 
Alzheimer's disease or other types 
of dementia. The meetings are in- 
formal and facilitated by a Lake 
Forest Hospital staff member. For 
- more information, call 295-3619, 
ext. 5982. 

Breast cancer 
support group 

For breast cancer patients and' 
their loved ones. This group pro- 
vides emotional and psychological 
support for those dealing with 
breast cancer. Designed as an open 
discussion group, topics are select- 
ed each month and include 
changes in body image, coping with 
chemotherapy and Its side effects, 
on-going medical follow-up arid 
physician relationships. While the 
group does not have an education- 
al focus, participants teach each 
other oping techniques for living 
with cancer and its treatment. The 
group meets on the second Tues- 
day of each month from 7 to. 8:30 
p.m. in the administrative confer- 
ence room. For more information, 
call Carrol Stovold at 234-5600, ext. 
6445. 




B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



January 1, 1999 



Teen births drop to 10-year low 




Illinois teenagers are having few- 
er babies, continuing the downward 
trend of the past decade that has 
seen the percentage of babies born 
to girls 19 years of age and younger 
fall to the lowest level since 1988, ac- 
cording to figures released today by 
the Illinois Department of Public 
Health. 

Of the 180,649 births to Illinois 
women -in 1997, 12.5 percent, or 
22,646, were to teenage girls, down 
from 12.7 percent in 1996 and the 
lowest since 12,5 percent was 
recorded 10 years ago. 

"We are beginning to see evidence 
that efforts to encourage teenagers to 
postpone sexual activity are having a - 



positive impact," said Dr. John R. 
Lumpkin, state publlchealth director. 
"Abstinence remains the best 
choice as most teenagers are not ready 
for the emotional, psychological and 
financial responsibilities of parent- 
hood. That message must continue to 
be conveyed by those who have an In- 
fluence on teens' lives— their family, 
friends, teachers, health care 
providers and religious advisors." 

The most recent study of American 
teens, released In 1997, found that 
sexual activity among teenagers 
dropped for the first time since the 
government began tracking the In- 
formation In 1970. Fifty percent of 
teenage girls had sex in 1995, down 



from 55 percent in 1990. The rate for 
teenage boys dropped from 60 per- 
cent in 1988 to 55 percent in 1995. 

Researchers believe that more 
teens are postponing sexual activity 
because of better school sex educa- 
tion, a concern about the conse- 
quences of having a child and the 
fear of HIV infection and AIDS. 

Among teens who are sexually ac- 
tive, the federal study said teenagers 
who have sex are more likely to use 
contraceptives, particularly condoms. 
Dr. Lumpkin said teenage moth- 
ers are less likely than older women 
to receive timely prenatal care, 
teenage mothers are more likely to 
smoke and less likely to gain the rec- 



ommended weight during pregnan- 
cy, arid more likely to have a low 
birthwelght baby, which is the lead- 
ing cause of infant mortality. 

In 1997 in Illinois, there were 9,104 
babies born to girls 17 years of age 
and younger, 40 percent of all teen, 
births. Births to 18-and 19-year-olds 
totaled 13,542. 

Among racial groups, African- 
American teenagers accounted for 
40 percent of all teen births, or 9, 152; 
98 percent were unmarried. There 
were 7,989 births to white teenagers, 
76 percent of whom were unmar- 
ried, and 5,303 to teens of Hispanic 
or Latino ethnicity, 72 percent of 
whom were unmarried. 



Helpful behavior tidbits for 




Hi folks, 
Hope your holidays 
were terrific. Wel- 
come to 1999. The fol- 
lowing helpful behavior tidbits 
are taken from my recently re- 
vised book, "Dr. Singer's Se- 
crets for Lightening Quick Be- ' 
havlor Change In Kids" 

This book was formerly ti- 
tled, "Why Time Out Doesn't 
Work." It has been revised, re- 
vamped and added to. If you 
are interested In having this 
book, call the number below 
for information. Hope these 
things are helpful for your 

1999. 

Our focus Is our reality' — 
telling children they can! 

People are creatures of habit 
and habits form from repetition of 
action. What we are focused on 
most of the time becomes our way 
oflife. 

With that in mind, think about 
the automatic responses we have to 
our children's bad behavior. We are 
all human and all react from the hip 
most of the time. It's important for 
you to know if you are constantly 
negative with your child, that nega- 
tivity will become both your focus 
and your child's focus all the time. 
This is how kids develop that fa- 
mous "negative Identity" we hear so 
much about 

We need to do something to 
make sure that discipline is balanced 
and both positive and negative. A 
good 98 percent of the success you 
will have with changing your child's 
behavior will come from being 
aware of how you're reacting all the 
time and making sure that your 
child's primary focus in life is being 
positive and knowing how to do the 
behaviors you WANT to see. 

We can choose to take the hard 
road or the easy one. I will tell you 
that if you immerse your children in 
knowing what good behavior is and 
teach them they always have a 
choice in what they do, you will not 
have to go down that hard road. ■ 
Remember that our focus be- 
comes our reality. Children who are 
immersed in bad behavior will do 
those behaviors more and more. 
We need to teach I CAN! . 

The dilemma of 
self-esteem vs. discipline 

Our society has it backwards 
■ when it comes to self esteem. Some- 
how, people in our society have 
come to believe that self esteem is 
something that develops solely out of 
nurture! compassion and giving 
things without earning them. 

We spend lots of time giving 
people things. We lower expecta- 
tions.jAfe make situations easier. 
All in the name of building self-es- 
. teem, Unfortunately, this very thing 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Sherri Singer, 
Psy.D. 



does the exact opposite. This be- 
havior creates dependency and the 
opposite of self-reliance and inde- 
pendence. GIVING people any- 
thing, generally tends to do that 

In my experience, self-esteem 
develops out of meeting standards 
and expectations, It develops out of 
one's knowledge that one has the 
ability to meet those requirements 
and that one has made the effort 
and journey to get there. 

The problem we face In our so- 
ciety is not that people are without 
achievement or without ability. 
The problem in our society is that 
we are too quick to lower standards. 
Too quick to make the surround- 
ings easier instead of build the 
character inside. We don't provide 
enough of a road map for the way to 
reach success on our own. Instead 
we make detours to get halfway 
there. This doesn't help anyone. 
Most of all children. 

When it comes to children and 
this area, the main problem area 
lies in what challenges the children 
have. If our child has a limitation in 
a certain area, we become fearful 
that pushing that child farther than 
the child has gone before will some- 
how damage him. So, we back off 
and take the detour. 

I have been involved with many 
families where gentle pushing and 
encouragement were the very 
things which helped their child 
reach a new level of success and 
true self esteem. 

I believe true self esteem comes 
from striving and working hard and 
reaching goals we know are there 
and attainable. If a child is told he 
can't do something, he will believe it 
Remember, our focus is our reality. 
If a child is encouraged that he 
can do something but it will take 
work, he can do it He will do it I 
have seen kids go from "Fs" in i 
school to "As" in school within only 
a couple month period of time us- 
ing this philosophy. Every- 
one has limitations. If we choose to 
live by our limitations rather than 
our strengths, we will surely live a 
limited life, If we reach for the stars 
and only make it 3/4 of the way 
there, the strength of the journey is 
what is thrilling and satisfying. 
- Who says that with some more 
work we won't make the other 1/4 
of the way? 

Asking questions versus 
making statements 

When we are in the heat of bat- 



■ 






tie with our kids, our first inclina- 
tion is to tell the child things. We 
tell him what he's done and how it 
has upset us. We tell him what he 
should have done. We tell him why 
it was bad. We do this because we 
are usually so angry that we have to 
get it all out We also do it to try and 
regain our power (which is usually a 
losing battle after the fact) We 
also do It to warn our children of 
the impending disaster of doing it 
again. Any of us who have gone 
down that "statement making" road 
know what the look in our child's 
eyes is while this is occurring. There 
is this "half glazed zombie look" of 
,"not again." 

Some of us have seen a 
Doonesbury comic with a dbg and a 
master. The master sees a mess the 
dog made and begins to go on and 
on about what the dog did and how 
the dog shouldn't have done it, etc. 
In the next frame, you see what the 
dog actually hears which is... "Blah- 
Blah, Blah Blah Blah Blah, Blah 
Blah." It is a funny comic and while 
I am certainly not comparing your 
child to a dog or any other animal, 
you need to be aware that no mat- 
ter what the age of the child, they 
prefer to tune out ranting state- 
ments just as any of us do. 

Well, where does that leave us, 
you' might ask? What can we do to 
get through to our children. My 
suggestion to you is that instead of 
using statements and ranting, that 
you use questions in a quiet, calm 
tone. 

Think about it Let's say I tell 
you that your house is brown and 
white with shutters on it You might 
say, "ok, it is." What if I ask you, 
"What does your house look like?" 
There is a different response that 
the brain has to a question than a 
statement For a split second after a 
question is asked, the brain re- 
sponds. There is a different tone in 
the voice with a question and the 
brain responds to It. Try it a couple 
times, you'll see!- 

With multiple statements, we 
can miss entire lectures, but with a 
question, there is a level of alertness' 
that comes with it. Think about the 
last time you were siting in a class- 
room looking bored by the lecture 
and the teacher fired a question at 
you. Didn't it wake you up and in- 
troduce a little shock wave into your 
system? It certainly did for me! 

If nothing else, asking questions 
tends to diffuse a battle between 
you and your child and make it into 
a conversation. Now, this does 
NOT mean I want you to begin : ' ■ 
ranting questions over and over 
again, because it would have the 
, same effect that statements would. 

One well asked question with ■ 
the right tone that feeds into things 
that have been gone over, can have 
just the desired effect in getting 



through to a child. It's really magi- 
cal to watch. In the book, I'll be 
talking more about when to ask 
questions and how to phrase them 
correctly to get the right kind of be- 
havior. • 

Laughter is the 
best medicine 

It truly is! One of the things I 
find most successful when working . 
with young children is making' 
them laugh. It fs usually an instant 
ice breaker. It's also something that 
they usually don't expect Most kids 
who act out a lot are used to a A + B 
= C equation with the "A" being bad 
behavior, the "B' being "getting 
caught, and the "C" being the par- 
ent's loud and irritated reaction. 

I'm certainly no t telling you to 
laugh after your child has done 
something wrong, but if you use 
laughter and humor at the begin- 
ning of the problem, sometimes It 
can really loosen up a situation and 
help avoid the negative conclusion. 

For example, in my office, I may 
be sitting with a child who doesn't 
want to cooperate and is complain- 
ing saying things like, "I don't want 
to do this!" I will turn to that child in 
a very silly face and say In a very 
funny, strange accent and voice 
(not even close to my own,) some- 
thing totally unrelated to the sub- 
ject such as, " Vhat (not a typo) are 
you babbling about?" 

Now, in writing, it might not 
sound very funny or even remotely 
sensitive, however, when you say it 
in a silly tone, the next thing you 
usually see is a smile and a look of 
cautious disbelief on your child's 
face. 

Most of the time, the problem Is 
either gone or somewhat removed 
at that point Now, it may seem silly 
to you, but what you have done, Is 
changed your's and your child's fo- 
cus to something lighter, broken 
the ice and now can proceed to al- 
ternatives to getting the behavior 
on target 

It doesn't work in all situations, 
but In many, it does. Think of the 
last time you watched an episode of 
your favorite comedy show. One of 
my favorites is "Seinfeld." I recently 
watched a "Best Of'shoW and 
found myself in complete laughter. 
While I was there, it was virtually 
impossible to think of any of the 
. things that were stressing me out 
that day. Laughter Is the best medi- 
cine... I guarantee it! , 



This column is for entertainment 
purposes only. Information in this 
column cannot and should not re- 
place proper Psychological treat- . 
ment. Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed . 
Clinical Psychologist, childhood be- 
havior specialist. Call in your ques- 
tions and comments: (708) 962-2549. 




MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 



A One-Year 




to 2000 




January 1, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B9 




workin 



impressions 




5 



By the time, you read this, 
some of you _ will have al- 
ready broken a few of your 
New Year's resolutions. 
Others will approach this year as 
you have every previous year. Ho " 
hum, so what else Is new? * 

What's new Is that we are on 
the brink of a ne\v millennium! An 
exciting, once-every-thousand- 
years experience that we will never 
witness again. 

in early 1900, the Niew York 
Times chronicled the new century 
with these editorial comments: 
"The advance of the human race - 
during the past one hundred years 
has not been equaled by the 
progress of man within any of the 
preceding ages." The.Times could : 
rewrite that editorial and apply jt tp ; 
this century as well; What a glori- 
ous century it has been. 

As Americans read the paper , 
that day in 1900 they never 
dreamed of headlines to come. No 
one,expected World War I, the stock 
.market crash, the ensuing depres- 
sion and Word.War II, manned 
flight and space travel. Television, 
computers arid car phones were not 
on their minds...- 

Now, as we countdown the 
days to 2000, we are in no better po- 
sition ^o.BFfidjgjtlieJuAvrqAhun , ,-. 
were they; Global economies will 
rise and fall, trends will come and 
go and leaders will succeed and fail, 
Only the master timekeeper will 
know the course of events. . 

When we awaken on January I, 
gpOO, we will face a brand new day 
1st as we did today. There will be 
foblems to solve,* jobsthat need 
[oing and reasons for action. 



The New Century 

Let's take a whimsical journey 
[Into the first century of the new mil 
[lennium. As a trained engineer, 
[your job is to find new uses for 
things made obsolete, For example, 
what to do with those hallowed 
halls of now empty colleges and 
universities. The new Laser Optic 
Brain Cell Information Transfer 
Technology (Lobciti) patented in 
early 2008 allows complete transfer 
of all knowledge directly into the 
human mind. No professors, class- 
rooms or textbooks are needed. For 
a one-time fee of $25,000 you can 
become a true know-it-all. 

You also have the challenge of 
what to do with all those empty 
hospitals and medical centers. The 
new medical breakthrough, Gene 
Engineering Matrixing(GF.M) pro- 
vides total wellness through' gene 
positioning and manipulation- 
There islio more cancer, no more 
heart disease, and no more addic- 
tion. 

Other of your associates' strug- 
gle with the issues created in the, 
changing retail environment. Once 
the Molecular Optimizing Virtual 
F.hhanring Imaging Technology 
(MOVE-IT J became popular, folks 
no longer go to stores to shop. They 
simply log into their T-hpxi's and 
transport items into their homes via 
the MOVli-IT system. "I hey keep 
whauhey want and beam- the oth- 
ers hack to their manufacturers. 



■Vlea'st' .sec TAYLOR / tiW 



Impressions are important in 
the business world, Studies 
show individuals often make 
lasting value judgments of ' 
pjaces and people in trie first 10 sec- 
onds of contact. In addition to com- 
fortable furniture, your decorating 
scheme should set a mood and 
make a favorable impression. 

^Thoughtfully planned reception . 
and meeting areas can help create a 
posltiveatmosphere and put visl- 
tors (and employees) at ease. Hut if ' 
your budget is limited, or your * 
rooms are small, windowlessj and 
uninteresting, planning the decor 
can be quite a challenge- 
Printed wall murals are one of 
the hottest trends in business decor 
because they're an economical way 
to help transform a sterile environ - 
. ment into a warm, inviting setting. 
Murals are applied tike wallpaper 
and cover an entire wall with, for 
example, a vibrant landscape scene. 
Besides the aesthetic value and 
interest they add to a room, they . 
also give the optical illusion of ex- 
panding it's size. The effect can be 
quite dramatic, particularly in - 
smaller rooms. 

People instinctively relax while 
viewing a serene panorama of 
rivers, sky or woods. Ralph Waldo 
Emerson believed in the restorative 
and spiritual powers of nature, and* 

jn Jil£ many es^ays^c^fiU hpw.,' t- 
nature could inspire and renew. If, 
you want to impart : a sense of cal m 
or "visual comfort" in'your busi- 
ness, a wall mural could be the an- 
swer.. 

, Environmental Graphics is a 
Minnesota company regarded by 
decorators and interior designers as 
the world's foremost producer of 
printed murals. The company took 
its name because of the way their 
murals virtually transform the in- 
door environment. 

Known for their highly, de- 
tailed photographic designs, the 
company also credits versatility as 
a major factor in their product's 
popularity. • 

"A mural design won't be suc- 
cessful unless it can be used in a va- 
riety of settings/' says company 
president Ted Yoch. "We put a great 




Printed-waUimvirals. ^rj%poe|p^tho.hcitt)^Ucnd%in l b < u^r}Qss^|eco,r because.ttiey'jrje an economical 
way to help, transform a sterile environment ; Into a warm) inviting setting. 



deal of thought into choosing our 
designs. We look for scenes (hat 
don't overpower, yet still become a 
room's focal point." 

^Interior Planning & Design is a 
Madeira Beach, Florida firm spe- 
cializing in office decor. "We've" 
made extensive use of murals be- 
cause, they work so well in that set- 
ting," says ispokesman Bobby 
Belcher. "People find them relaxing 
to look at. And the visual depth 
they add to a room is very : real." He 
goes on to say that because of the 
low price, "many of our clients ca)l ■ 
us in to put up a new design after 
just a few years." 

As a rule, murals are litho- 



graphically printed for true color 
and high resolution. Although they 
measure a full.wallrsize (more 
tlian 8feet talland iiearly.14 feet 
wide), they can be trimmed to fit - 
smaller walls* and around existing 
fixtures. A price tag of.Iess than 
$100 makes them especially at- 
tractive when you consider that an 
arlist : created mural of similar size 
would cost thousands more, - 

These tips for decorating with 
wall murals are ottered: 

• The same decorating rules ap- 
ply that you use in a Hying room or 
family room. The rborh must have a 
sense of cohesiveness and a focal 
point. Wall murals serve as a strong 



focal point witli furniture arranged 
. .for the greatest "view". 

• I nteriors are shapes in space. 
Ifyou don't have windows to pro- 

-vide a.natural counterpoint to a 
boxy feel, you can get the most out 
of your room by installing a" wall 
mural. Wall murals offer a jiicture- 
window effect and sense of cxpau- 
sivencss. 

• In interior design, what counts 
te presence. Furniture pieces juxta- 
posed with something as impres- 
sive as a wall mural allow you to 
create whatever mood you desire. 

Coiirl'esy of Article Resource As- 
socation, wivw.aracopy.com 



New Year's 



Are you spending too much time 
on family finances? Are you willing to 
make 1999 the year you put.yourfi- 
liuncial life in order? Commit to the 
following. resolutions suggested by 
the Illinois CPA Society, and you'll . 
find you have more time and money 
for the things you really enjoy. 

I resolve to simplify 
my checking account 

Slick to one checking account. 
Mainlining nuiltiple clicking ac- 
counts requires extra effort and. 
costs more in service fees. If your 
bank offers check imaging, give it a 
try.'lnstead of getting your actual 
checks' returned, you get pages 
with red need copies of your 
checks. Tliti 'pages can be filed eas- 
ily in a loose-leaf hinder and the 
hank will provide a copy of a pale) 
check should you need it. 
, Want to skip the nuisance and 
. embarrassment of bounced checks? 
Sign up for overdraft cluT.king, If you 
accidentally write a check that ex- 
ceeds yoiii balance, the hank lends 
you the money ami pays the check. 





SI 




1 




g your 





I resolve to consolidate 
my banking accounts 
and investments 

Many banks now offer relation- 
ship accounts that combine your 
checking, savings, .and retirement 
accounts as well as certificates of de- 
posit. You . receive one monthly 
statement showing all your transac- 
tions and all your balances/Better 
yet, consider a central brokerage ac- 
count where you can manage your, 
investing, savings, horrowing and 
spending, all iti a single account. 
Some brokerage firms even supply 
you with an ATM card for convenient 
access to your "money. . 

I resolve to arrange for 
automatic bill paying 

You can arrange to have your 
hank pay certain bills, such as your 

mortgage, utilities, and insurance, 
automatically from your checking 

• account on the payment date you se- 
lects You save. time. writing checks 
and avoid fees for late payment. 

I resolve to consolidate 



my mutual funds 

When you buy all- your hinds 
from one fund family, you receive a 
single consolidated statement that 
makes it easier to keep track of your 
investments. Many of the 'fund fam- 
ilies ; offer a wide selection of funds 
and allow you to transfer by phone 
from one fund to another. 

I resolve to automate 
my investing strategy 

-Many mutual fund companies 
will be glad to set up an automatic 
monthly jnyesimeni plan that sim- 
plifies, your financial. -life; l-ach 
. month, the fund company takes the .. 
amount you specify from your bank 
account and invests it in the funtl(s) 
of your choice. You'll be spared the 
bother of writing checks, "phis you'll 
he making regular investments. 

I resolve to sign up 
for direct deposit 

As of the etul.of'l99H, all Social 
Security checks ami most other, fed- 
eral benefits you are entitled to re- 
ceive must be deposited directly into 



your bank account. You can save 
trips to the bank and concerns about 
possible mail delays by also having 
your paycheck, pension, -dividend 
payments or other recurring pay- 
ments deposited automatically. -Try 
to make it a habit to check your bank 
statements regularly to see that all 
the deposits are credited accurately. 

I resolve to organize 
my out-of-pocket 
insured expenses 

Your timely submission, of re- 
ccipts and documentation lor out- 
of-pocket costs lor insured expenses 
will speed up reimbursements from 
medical, automobile, homeowners, 
and other insurance carriers. 

I resolve to buy 
insurance through 
a single agent 

Yoii may get a discount for hay- . 
ing your home, .auto, life, and pei 
sonal liability insurance in oiie plate. 
and you'll have one less salesperson 

Please see RESOLUTIONS ! li 1 



■ 



-" '-• - ■"■■ ■■— 



rrjn k- 



' 



I- hi 



i" 



~->-fj,. . 



*+-\.\ 






D1U /Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



January 1,1999. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

livlow arc real estate transactions far villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase ptice, ; •■>■ * 



Antioch 



19-1 Cedanvbbd Lane, lirlinda 

Seckola. SI 14,000 

481 Johella. Walter Paramski. 

S125.000 

39931 N. Hidden HunkLT Cotirl. 

Stanley & Eileen Polichi. 

S) 10.420 

39939 \\Jliddcn Hunker Court. 

David J. Jensen. SI \JtlU2p 

414 N. Long Drive, Eugene Lies & 

Oneta Johnston. $200,816 

42024 Smith St.. Richard Catnpo 

Sr., S95.900 



Fox Lake 



75 Tweed .Itoad. Phil Rosenthal 

Grayslake 

12 Oak Street. Michael Staff, 

S350.000 

34220 Tangueray, Timothy .VI. & 

Sara II. Tumpane. $225,500 

702 \V. Traif NorduMichael j: • 

Vesper jr., $240,000 



Green Oaks 



31 1411 Prairie Ridge Road. Donna 
Fri-iherKiT. $395,000 



4 154 Kenwood, Gary R. & Jody L 
Mullen, S235.000 
367 Kingsport Drive, Hryon 
Michael Howard, 5275,000 
4775 Middle Road, Philip & Joy 
Rowlands, $254,000 
33850 N. Summerfield Drive, 
Robert li. Borre.& Kelly Laiiler- 
borre.S294.85H 

614 Saiul wedge. Sandra Pearson. 
SI 39,000 

10672 W.Apple Lane, Anton \L. 
Koenigsntnnn & Marion L. Ko- 
engsmann, 5209,500 
16267. West Old Hickory, David & 
• Valenc Aniabamero, S269.826 
90 White Barn, Steve & Cherie 
Varenvi, SI 96,000 

HainesviHe 

160 Hast Littleton Trail, Paul W. & 
Kalista A. Rateike, 5187,328 

Hawthorn Woods 

50 Lynn Drive. William J. & Claire 

I!. Sullivan. S525.000 

53. Parkview I. tine. Joe & Dagmara 

tribuzio! $596:000 



Gurnee 



Ingleside 



450 Capital l.;ine. Steven I. & 

Molly I. Rogers. $270,000 

4451 Country Trail, (.retehen 

Garrety. $161,000 

6208 Eagle Ridge Drive. Kyle & 

Leigh Kost. SI 30. 1 00 

6138 Ciollyiew, Stephen Rastie'n, 

SI 93.500 



26356 Blackluiwk. Albert I:. Hint. 
S 1 06.500 ' 

35728 N. Benjamin Ave.. Time & 
loiyenBaldocchi. $125,000 
33632 N. Christa;Drive,' William 
\\\ Currie. $07,500 
36409 X. Tara Court, George Gi- 
aunakakis & Fay Gianakakis. 
SI 77.000 



26444 W. Ingleside Shore Road, 
Roger Kubitz, SI 99,900 

Lake Villa 

21590 Birch Street, Jmk Group 
Inc., $60,000 

25750 E. Lehmann, Louis & 
Frances Richter, $249,000 
37596 Granada Blvd. Tony & An- 
gela Norton, $25,000 
37076 N. Bonnie Brae Road, 
Sharon L Burr, 5323,480 
38186 North Highway 59. 
Richard Lcvoy Lang lii & Carolyn 
A. Meyer, SI 16,500 
336 Pathway Drive. Bernard A. & 
Helen Tomko. $175,275 
849 Summit Court, Robert F. 
Heih, $210,000 

10624 W, Lazy Acre Road, Jlian R. 
& Hilary Dolphin, 5333,965 . 
18639 West Lazy Acre Rd., Daniel 
A. Doseary, $329,306 
12 Winddance Drive, Jay A.' 
David, SI 96,500 

Libertyville 

125 Adlcr Drive, John & Sandra 
Kruckman,S245,obO 
16325 Buckley Road, Cyula& 
Maria Elena Jonas. $155,000- 
710Caliente, JavChevian, 
SI 62,000 

1081 Oak Spring Lane, Elkin R. 
Isaac. $287,500 
5500 River Park Drive, Brian 
Whelihan. S572.999 
1 037 Tamarack Lane, Paul & Lin- 
da Yakopovich, SI 80,000 

Lindenhurst 

692 Autumn Circle, James & Kel- 
leyKlimek, $154,770 
465 Bam Swallow Drive, Gregory 
& Keily Shepard, $204,915 



YOU'RE READING 




S?£ 



T^Tf^J 



k 



1 w i r fr P 



uy mm 

And the judges agree 

This veaiyal Ihe Illinois Press Association Awards, 

I .akelancl Newspapers brought back 

an arm load oP honors- 11 in all- 

which is just one more accolade that tells us 

you are reading a quality product each week. 



funics iVom Best of the Press: 

NEWSPAPER DESIGN ' NEWS STORY 

FIRST PLACE: FIRST PLACE: 



S«6 cnt55 



LIFESTYLE SECTION 

FIRST PLACE: 




I iHnlilur-iiurr 



I I 



mosi ■*r.rn- 



'l.ll'jl l..\<n.l 

Ill tlUllll iMriiVul 

l"*U . I'|»\ .in. I 

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, J|'|HMI JIM.'. f»»t U"* 
i.] i Hi.,,- 111,1 .,j| \.l* 
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Mil,"* I ... ..I III 1\> 
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Mi I'll Mil-. 1-1.1 i « V tfjtl.l 

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• S^JT^MUV. IV»UT^ 



THIRD PLACE: 

■IJIIriil»llaMin„i (.•will I 



HONORABLE MENTION: 



• *tuk ulmrr/Hutl 

•CiflcliwKiilifinn lih'il* 



HrpurlliiH (1|./J.,i,|.(.h,(i>'i 
lh:,iUililulfi 



■ Aj[/kul(urT/llu*lnrv« HrpertlnR >'""< li»"u' 
N.rl Inll.f *. 'ill. I'j |\|ti 'u-.| 
.(olurr.Mury I immn'lHilii' (.i.'lliU- 
• lr>lulrrhulutr*|lhi tiff, I >xi- •.!■('« 

- .i(.i4(.L ' \u*h /iii *,*h* i 



> spon.Murr \U ■•«'. fnnhiinii \n:r 
• Npontl'oluina 'li>iti,luii,t'.< . 

/Ii,l..(,ilrll \,',i; |i. .til.il. 



439 Gold Finch Circle, Christo- 
pher & Sharon Bucholtz, 
5190,000 

1701 Hazel wood, Jeff & Beth Eu- 
daley, $158,500 

474 Mockingbird Court, Dave & 
Angie Hebeda, $230,744 
321 S. Thornvvood, Scott & Paula 
Norkus, $160,000 
22303 Sprucewood Lane, Temple 
E. Murpliy, $125,000 
721 Summit Court, Ronald & Jen- 
nifer Gaida, $50,900 

Mundelein 

526 Banbury Road, John Shift, 
5185,000 

1787 Bhrnhill, john-M. Huber, 
$157,000 

.1050 Franklin Street, Frandy & 
Carol Rothstein, $225,961 
128 N. Ridgemoor, Stephen B. & 
Deborah J. Slaughter, $107,500 
940 N\v Holcomb, Randall J. Kru- 
el, $201,000 

212 S. Shaddle Ave., Terry D. Bar- 
ron, $99,900 
27 W. Hawley, Christian 
Watschkc, $103,000" .. 
1060 Wcstfield Way, Phillip T. & 
Cathlcen L. like, $284,782 

Round Lake 

2462 1 W. Clinton Ave., Jose Ra- 
mon & Cecilia Valadez. $98,800 , 

Round Lake Beach 

1032 Fox Chase Dr., Robert J. 
Fridlund, $118,000 
621 Heather Terrace, Anthony & 
Marianne Kittinger, $128,000 
515Meadowhill, Madeline J. 
Reed, $85,500 



1612 Melrose, Julio Cordova, 
$94,000 

1325 N. Lotus; Steven & Candy 
Simon, $95,000 

1 1 17 Oak Terrace, Jeffery Ander- 
son, $91i500 

631 Oakwood Dr., David & Linda 
Carroll, $92,200 

Round Lake Park 

209 Falrlawn, Jordan Davis, 
$39,900 

Wadsworth _^ 

39847 Mauser Drive, John & De- 
bra Wicks, $4 1,-500 
2812 N. Southern. Hills Drive, 
John W. & Marilyn A. Peck, 
$223,110 

40925 Timberland Trail, James 
Matkovick,' $179,900 . 

Waucon da 

743 Appaloosa Trail, Daniel & ' 
Mary Seminaro, $295,000 
206 Church, Allen J. Ludvigson, 
$115,000 



Information provided by Record 
Information Services, Inc. in St. 
Charles. The company provides 
public record data for lake, DuPage, 
Cook, Kane, McHenry, Kendall and 
Will counties including new incor- 
porations, business licenses, bank- 
ruptcies, foreclosures, judgments, 
mechanic Hens, state and federal tax 
liens, residen tial and commercial 
real estate transfers, building per- 
mits, DUI arrests, divorce reports, 
sheriff sale foreclosures, (630) 365- 
6490, public-record.com. 



FROM PAGE B9 




-, 



■ 



: Coimtdown 



to the year 2000 

T-boxes replaced personal 
computers in 2007. These new 
"technology-boxes" are thefsizeof a 
credit card, radio wave powered, 
voice activated and directed, apd 
require no operating system or soft- 
ware. Bill Gales took bankruptcy in 
2008. The government dismissed ;- 
Microsoft's anti-trust investigation 
in 2010. They cited Microsoft's ' 
2008 revenues of $519 as evidence 
that the company no longer held a 
monopoly position. ' 

i 

Ford Motor Company pro- 
duced the last Sports Utility Vehfcle 
(SUV) in 20 11 . The latest trans- 
portation rage is the Chrysler built 
Flying Aquatic Regional Trans- 
porter, affectionately referred to 
as... "the Runabout." GM and Ford 
are testing prototypes of their new 



plane/boat/car vehicles. " 

Hariey-Davidson acquired 
Japan's Honda Motor Company for 
$1.3 trillion and free lifetime golf for 
all Honda directors. Hurley will 
produce its 2012 models in the old 
Honda factories. City commission- . 
ers from Milwaukee, Wl, annexed 
Sturgis, SD, in a surprise move last 
. month. 

I'd love to tell you more, but 
I've got to beam this column to the 
"Netpaper." Funny thing about 
columns, deadlines still apply. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
"Up Against the Wal-Mqrts." You 
may write to him in care of 
"Minding Your Own Business," 
P.O. Box 67, Amarillo, TX 79105. 



RESOLUTIONS: 

lify your finances 




to deal with. If you can afford to do 
so, pay for the full year's premium at 
once and get rid of time-consuming 
monthly check writing. 

I resolve to store securities 
with my broker 

To save yourself the trouble of 
delivering stocks and bonds to your 
broker ; each time you're ready to sell 
an investment; have your broker 
hold your securities in the firm's 
street name. Then,' when you're 
ready to sell, just call your broker. 
The Securities Investors Protection 
Corp. insures securities held with a 
broker for up to $500,000. 

I resolve to organize 
my tax records 

Keeping organized ^records can 
ensure that you don't overlook de- 



ductions at filing time. Expenses as 
diverse as professional society dues 
and job-related moving costs maybe 
deductible if you keep good tax 
records. 

CPAs suggest you resolve to 
spend an hour or two a month orga- 
nizing your receipts, canceled 
checks, and other documentation 
you'll need to substantiate your de- 
ductions. This may help lower your 
tax bill and keep 'your tax* return 
preparation fees to a minimum. 

The Illinois CPA Society is the 
state professional association repre- 
senting over 26,000 certified public 
: accountants throughout Illinois. For 
information on additional CPA Soci- 
ety programs, events, products and 
services, individuals caii visit the So- 
ciety's web site at http://www.ic- 
pas.org. . ., 



■ 

II 



■ ■ ;,. :■-■ - ■ . . 



January 1, 1999 



LAKELBFE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B1 1 




MOOUCID IT flLD IN1ISTAINMINT 

Presents 





21-24 




JAN. 26-FEB. 7 



UNITED CENTER 




WINNERS WILL BE AWARDED 4 TICKETS EACH! 



♦Deadline is- January 11, 1 999, 5:OOpm 



HERE'S 






Tvr. 



• 




Fill oul entry form and drop: off or mail to address bdow. Winners.will be notffled by phone; 
tickets available for pick-up al Lakeland Newspapers. 1st & 2nd places will be awarded In 
thefollowing categoriesi.Age^ 4 to 6; Ages 7 to 9: Ages 10 to 12 No purchase 
necessary. Employees and families of Lakeland Publishers are ineligible to win. 

SEND ENTRY TO: 

coloring contest 

c/o lakeland newspapers 

p.o;boxi66 
gpayslake. il 600^0 



NAME 



ADDRESS 
CITY_ 



_ STATE 



ZIP 




DAY PHONE 



: AGE 



HBHB 



LAKELIFE 



January 1,1^99 



B12 /Lakeland Newspapers 



B"tf*" 




On 



Rollins Road between Route 83 and Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake Beach, IHinois 




18 Wall To Wall Sevens •3,900 Seats 





servinghot drinks &bahdgoods withmfractabkcupndderaimwsts 

Large Concession Stand • Customer Service Counter 
CreditCardSalesAcceptedatBoxOffice ||^§> 

DTS/SDDS&Dolby Digital Sound ^ 
Equipped for me Hearing Impaired 

2 Day Advanced Ticket Sales 
Handicap Accessible 
Video Game Room 







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_ . .,.» - ... . v ._. «•-..-.. „,. „ «-.'."_• :x.ii .-..-.- k nfnwj: 



I" 1 ""-. 



I 





Lakeland 
Newspapers 

Jmnryl, 
1999 



Section 




New year ushers in new laws 



New laws are designed to crack down on juvenile 
crime, drunk driving and domestic violence 




™ 21 ROSZKOWSKI motorists with two or more DUI con- surance violators, "we have increased 
Lity Editor victionstocarryamobtteBreathalyz- the penalties for domestic violence," 
------- ----- er test in their cars with an Ignition in- according to Geo Karis. A new do- 
Laws that crack down on juvenile terlock system, which- will prevent mestic violence law makes It a Class 4 
crime, drunk driving and domestic . the car from starting if the driver has felony (punishable by one to three 
violence are just a few of the newlaws been drinking. years in prison) for domestic battery 

Meanwhile, the Impounding or violating an order ofprotectlon. 
and Reinstatement of Drivers Under This would be In effect If there is a pri- 
me Influence Act increases the : or conviction for domestic violence 
hours a law enforcement officer can 
Impound the automobile driven by 
a driver under the Influence. It also 



that will take effect in 1999. 

State Sen. Adeline Geo Karis, Rt 
Zion, said juvenile crime will be dealt 
with more severely under the new Ju- 
venile Justice Act, which takes effect 
Jan. 1. 

The law focuses 
on preventing juve- 
niles from leading a 
life of crime through 
Intervention pro- 
grams. Geo Karis said 
the new law allows 
judges to give minors 
a blended juvenile 
and adult sentence. 

"If the juvenile 
fails to successfully 
complete the juvenile sentence, then 
they can face more serious adultsen- 
tences, Including possiblyjail time," 
Geo Karis said. 

" Under the law, parents will also 
share more responsibility if their chil- 
dren break the law, such as paying for without insurance will also face stiffer 
damages to a victim's property, ac 



'If the juvenile fails to successfully 

complete the juvenile sentence, 

then they can face more serious 

adult sentences, including 

possibly jail time 3 

Senator Adeline Geo Karis 
R-Dist.31Zion 



increases the reinstatement fee for 
those individuals who have had 



or a violation of an order of protec- 
tion. 

Other state laws taking effect 
Jan. 1 Include: 

•New laws designed 
to combat the open- 
ing of illegal metham- 
phetamlne or "meth" 
labs. One of the laws 
provides that a person 
found to be in posses- 
sion of ephedrine, the 
main component of 
methamphetamine, 
will be charged with a 
Class 4 felony, punishable by up to 
three years in prison and a $25,000 





. 








xuS 


*"^s 


d^ 








%*il 


1 





. 



L 

? •: 



cording to Geo Karis. More than $30 
million was included in the 1999 Illi- 
nois budget to pay for intervention 
programs, additional juvenile facili- 
ties and probation officers. 



their license suspended or revoked fine. Another new law provides a 

two or more times due to a DUI con- prison sentence of between 6 to 30 

victiqn. years for the illegal manufacture of 15 

People who get caught driving grams of metaphetamine. 

lout insurance will also face stiffer • New legislation requiring the 

penalties, Geo Karis said. A hew Re- Illinois Commerce Commission to 

peat insurance Offenders law pro- develop annual and five-year project 

hiblts court supervision for individu- , plans of rail crossing Improvements 

als caught driving as an uninsured .that will be paid for by the Grade 

motorist for a second or subsequent '.Crossing Protectlon'Fund. . 

offense.; , • A law that increases the penalty 



NEWLAWS 

become effective Jan. 1, 1999 



Agriculture 

Centennial Farms i (HB 3363) Allows the Department of Agricul- 
ture to designate farms owned for 100 years or more by female descen- 
dants andextended members of the same family.as Centennial Farms, 

Child Protection 

Toll-free Cfclldcare number (HB2583) Requires the Depart- 
merit of Children and Family Services to establish a toll-free telephone 
number to offer Information on past history and records of daycare . 
center. 

Crime and Corrections 

Community policing volunteers (HB 2400) Adds Aggravating 
factors and Increases penalties for anyone who commits a violent 
crime against a community policing vpIunteer.iMurdering a communi- 
ty policing volunteer will result in an automatic life sentence, 

: Pie-Release Supervision (HB 2447) Allows the Department of 
Corrections to establish a Womens arid Oiildrens Pre-Release Commu- 
nity Supervision Program to provide housing and services to female in- 
mates, their young children and/or newborn children. 

, School property damage (HB 1426) Increases the penalty for 
causing damage to a school building. 

Intoxlcaang compounds (SB 1289) Adds "intoxicating com- 
pounds" to the list of substances (alcohol, cannabis arid controlled 
substances) for which a motorist maybe charged with.driving under 
the influence (DUI). Intoxicating compounds largely consist of chemi^ 
cals used In aerosol paint propellents, glue, paint thinners and like 
products. 




Ignition Interlock (SB 1695) Protects motorists from drunk dri-- 
• verebyrequirmganig^tiontote^ 
test for drivers with two or moteDUI convictions. 




: tor Inti 
;. other pi 



weapons 

,adagger,di 
-tano 



ccojiupiuutiuununiuuib. onense. . • t\ law mat increases i 

^WtiV^ba;* soo^ **"anc« for, (j u-y^^ 



venue offenders) to stay put of jail and 
get* Irito"an';mieryeritiori progra 
Geo Karis said. 

Other laws are designed to pro- 
tect motorlsts : from drunk drivers. 
Geo Karis said one new law requires 



drunk drunkers and mandatory In- building. 



-a.- 





the penalty for usi 



therpersb 








< 



.1 



1 narrows as 



Hears 




WEEK 



UPSERVICE 

Get it off your chest 

PLEASE SEE 
PAGEC8 

BIG PAY DAY 

Are sports contracts 
going too far? 

PLEASE SEE 
PAGE C5 




on 



Two more sites trimmed from short list 




By JOHN ROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 




NEW YEAR'S TREATS 

See our special 
pull out section 

PLEASE SEE 
INSIDE C 



As decision time draws near, the 
field of potential sites for a pro- 
posed University Center of Lake 
County has been narrowed to a se- 
lect few. 

While no formal decisions have 
yet been made, two more sites have 
apparently been removed from 
consideration as potential locations 
for the University Center — the VA 
Hospital in North Chicago and the 
Village Green Golf Course in 
Mundelein. 

Task force member Charles 
Bartels said recent comments 
made by task force chairman 
Robert Grever indicate the two sites 
are not viable locations for the Uni- 
versity Center. 

"The VA Hospital just doesn't 
. work from a location standpoint 
and the Village Green is still a golf 
course so there is no development 
on it yet," said Bartels. "It's my un- 
derstanding that is why the chair- 
man pulled them off the list." 

The University Center Task 
Force is scheduled to meet at 10 
a.m. Jan. 7 at^the College of Lake 
County in Grayslake to review the 
remaining sites. 

. The sites still under active con- 
sideration Include a 14-acre site at 
ttieVGollege of Lake County in 
Grayslake, a 100-acre parcel of 
county-owned property known as; 



the County Farm in Libertyville, the 
Lakehurst Shopping Center in 
Waukegan, and an industrial park 
in downtown Mundelein near the 
Metra train station terminal. 

Bartels said he doubts a final 
decision will be made at the Jan. 7 
meeting, but expects the field may 

'This is clearly an 

indication that 

this project is moving 

off the drawing board 

and into reality for the 

citizens of Lake County* 

Don Sevener 

spokesman for Illinois Board 

of Higher Education 

be narrowed even further. The task 
force has until February to make its 
recommendation to the Illinois 
Board of Higher Education. 

In mid' December, the Board of 
Higher Education approved $13 
million in funding for the Universi- 
ty Center project starting in the next 
fiscal year, which begins in July. 

Don Sevener, director of com- 
munications for the Illinois Board 
of Higher Education, said $11 mil- 
lion will be used for construction 
and construction planning for the 
project. The other-$2 million will be 
: fdr-initial operating and staffing 
costs for the new University Center, 



"This is clearly an indication 
that this projecOs moving off the 
drawing board and into reality for 
the citizens of Lake County," he* 
said. 

Plans are for the stateto pick 
up half of the project's total con- 
struction cost of $22 million, with 
the county picking up the other 
half. 

County officials have expressed 
a desire for the state to pick up even 
a larger percentage of the construc- 
tion cost, but so far there has been 
no formal discussions on that is- 
sue. 

"The county has agreed to help 
fund construction of the facility, but 
I don't know that we've put percent- 
ages to that commitment yet," Bar- 
tels said. 

One hurdle that still needs to be 
overcome is the county currently 
lacks statutory authority to fund 
construction of the proposed Uni- 
versity Center. 

Lake County Assistant State's 
Attorney Mitch Hoffman has in- 
formed the University Center Task 
Force that a legislative change 
would be required to allow county 
government to contribute land "or 
financial resources to the project. 
Sevener said he does not think 
this will be a significant hurdle to 
overcome. 

"I have not heard that any of 
these particular, issues are insur- 
mountable^ It's not uncommon for 
., laws to be changed toiaccommo- 
date things that were hot anticipat- 
ed when the laws were drafted." 




iange 



com] 



stays stable 



By JOHN ROSZKOWSKI 
City Editor 

Although the leadership of the 
Lake County Board has undergone a 
dramatic change in recent weeks, the . 
group responsible for making the de- 
cision about a proposed University 
Center of Lake County will remain 
the same. 

New County Board Chairman 
Jim LaBelle said he supports the orig- 
inal appointments of the 13-member 
University CenterTask Force, Includ- 
ing former County Board chairman 
Robert Grever as the task force chair- 
man. 

The task force will make its rec- 
ommendation to the Illinois Board of 
Higher Education about the siting of 
the University Center by February. 

"I asked the County Board (in De- 
cember) to reaffirm the appoint- 
ments of Bob Grever as chairman and 
reaffirm the appointments he had 
made to the task force," said LaBelle. 
"TheyVe been working hard and we 
decided we didn't want to slow them 
down at this point They're in the 
process of reviewing sites and in the 
process'of approving plans." . 

In addition to Grever, among 
those who serve on the task force in- 

PleaseseeCHMiGIES IC2 



HILLARY DID ONE BETTER THAN BILL / C5 



■W" 



C 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



January 1, 1999 



Lake County educator becomes 
new State Supt. of Education 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



■ The new State Superintendent of 
Education is a familiar person to 
Lake County School officials. He is , 
after all, one of their own. 

Dr. Glenn McGee, superinten- 
dent of Deerfield Elementary School 
District 109, is the sixth superinten- 
dent to be appointed for Illinois and 
the first appointed directly to the po- 
sition. 

McGee will take office January 
1. He was appointed Thursday, 
Oct. 22. 

"He is a very dedicated educa- 
tor," said Dr. Daniel L. Burke, su- 
perintendent of Antioch Commu- 
nity Consolidated School District 
34 in Lake County. "I know him 
very well." 

McGee has been an Illinois 
teacher and administrator for 23 
years. For the past seven years, he 
has been school superintendent in 
Deerfield. Despite his leadership of 
an atypical district in the state, 
McGee has had close ties to down- 
state educators and is sensitive to the 
problems of poor schools and 
schools in Chicago. 

The Deerfield School District has 
higher levels of per pupil spending, 
has lower student-teacher class ra- 
tios, is demographically homoge- 
neous, and is relatively small com- 
pared to other districts in Illinois. 

Illinois School News Service 
highlighted "McGee's success in 
building a cooperative, 'mutual 
problem-solving' relationship with 
Deerfield district teachers union 
members; this is apparently intend- 
ed as reassurance that McGee's se- 



lection will solve some of the biggest 
problems (former state superinten- 
dent Joseph A.) Spagnolo created— a 
professional staff of hundreds of em- 
ployees who hated management." 

McGee has participated with the 
State Board of Education in such crit- 
ical programs as standards and as- 
sessments, school technology, 

Heisavery 
dedicated educator* 

Daniel L Burke 

superintendent of 

Antioch Community 

Consolidated School District 

school construction, and reading im- 
provement. One area to which 
McGee attaches high priority is the 
situation of at-risk students. The 
State Board of Education, according 
to the Illinois School News Service, 
has virtually ignored at-risk stude nts 
during the past decade. That view is 
based, in part, on the fact that The 
Illinois Truants Alternative/Optional 
Education Program— TAOEP— has 
received no budget increase since 
the late 1980s. 

McGee is especially concerned 
with special education programs, ac- 
cording to Burke. "That is something 
he will look at carefully." 

The Illinois School News Service 
noted: "Legislation to reform special 
education funding floundered in the 
State Senate in each of the last two 
years, while the Illinois State Board of 
Education lifted not one finger to res- 
cue the measures," 

Burke said that he expects 
McGee to guide efforts of the state's 
schools to use the new learning stan- 



dards. Burke said that McGee will 
work to have the standards intro- 
duced in a fair and practical way. 

Education funding is a third area 
in which Burke expects positive im- 
pacts by the McGee appointment. 
McGee is expected to help with fund- 
ing for education and he will find 
more ways to make it effective. 

Burke became acquainted with 
McGee during the past four years. 
Burke served as president of the Lake 
County Superintendents Associ atlori 
last year and as a result was able to 
work closely with him. 

Chairman of the State Board of 
Education Lou Mervis expressed 
strong pleasure about the appoint- 
ment. Among the credentials he cit- 
ed, to support his "superbly quali- 
fied" description of McGee, was 
McGee's "experience with many of 
the State Board's educational prior- 
ities and initiatives, including stan- 
dards, assessment, reading, tech- 
nology, school funding, school con- 
struction and special education." 

Mervis cited McGee's manage- 
ment skills and his successful rela- 
tions with employees as especially 
good. 

"I could continue at length de- 
scribing Max McGee's outstanding 
achievements and credentials," 
Mervis said in an October 21 memo- 
randum about the upcoming ap- 
pointment. "However, we also want 
to let you know that Max brings to 
this extraordinarily challenging posi- 
tion the personal qualities of quick 
intelligence, a sense of humor, high 
energy and a passionate dedication 
to children and education." 

"He's an outstanding Individ- 
ual," said Burke. 



■ ■ . ■ 
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FROM PAGE CI 



NEW LAWS: Ring in 
the New Year 

Gun running (HB 1249) Provides that a person convicted of gun-run- 
ning is ineligible for probation, periodic imprisonment or conditional dis- 
charge. 

Drug penalties (HB 3170} Changes the amount from 25 grams to 15 
grams for a penalty of six to 30 years of imprisonment for the manufacture of 
methamphetamine. 

Repeat Insurance offenders (SB 1471) Requires tougher enforce- 
ment for motorists who are repeatedly caught driving without insurance. 
Prohibits supervision for driving as an uninsured motorist for a second or - 
subsequent time. Requires that offenders file proof of financial responsibili- 
ty for up to a year with the Secretary of State. 

Impounding and reinstatement of drivers under the influence 

(HB 2306) Increases the hours an official can impound an automobile driven 
by a driver under the influence. Increases the reinstatement fee for those 
who have had their license suspended or revoked for two or more times be- 
cause of a DUI conviction. 

Domestic violence (SB1215) Makes it a Class 4 felony (one to three 
years in prison) for domestic battery or violating an order of protection if; 
there is a prior conviction for domestic battery or violation of an order of 
protection. (HB 3652) Takes into account during sentencing for first degree 
murder that the person who committed the act was, by order of protection, 
required to stay away from the victim. 

Obeying the crossing guard (HB 2466) Provides that a person who 
willfully fails or refuses to comply with a crossing guard shall be guilty of a 
petty offense and fined $150. 



Education 

School reading (HB 2887) Prevents schools whose students' reading 
skills fail to improve after participating in the State Reading Improvement 
Block Grant Program from receiving an additional grant 

Health Care 

Criminal background checks for doctors (SB 1491) Requires a 
criminal background check for out-of-state doctors wanting to get a license 
In Illinois. 

Insurance coverage with diabetes training and col o rectal 

screening (HB 3427) Requires insurers to allow women, to designate their 
, OB/GYN as their principal health care provider. Requires insurance compa- 
nies to provide coverage for certain outpatient diabetes self-management 
training and education and cover the cost of colon cancer screening for 
those 50 years or older and those 30 years or older who are at high risk. Al- 
lows life insurance beneficiaries to receive up to 75 percent of benefits in ad- 
vance if diagnosed with specified conditions. 



Transportation 

Rider safety (SB 1222) Dedicates a percentage of motorcycle registra- 
tion fees and a $5 motorcycle license fee to the Cycle Rider Safety Training 
Fund. 

Police Memorial license plates (SB 1938) Provides for Police . 
Memorial Committee license plates. Additional fees charged for the special . 
license plates will be used to maintain a memorial statute and give scholar- 
ships to children of police officers killed in the line of duty. 

Mammogram license plates (HB3248) Creates license plates with v 
the phrase "Mammograms Save Lives" to benefit the Susan G. Komen Foun- 
dation for breast cancer research, education, screening and treatment. 

Railroad crossings (HB 2510) Requires the Illinois Commerce Com- 
mission to develop annual and five-year project plans of rail crossing im- 
provements that will be paid for by the Grade Crossing Protection Fund. 



CHANGES: University 
Task Force remains the same 



clude.fourlake County Board mem- 
bers — Martha Marks, David Stol- 
man, Angelo Kyle and Robert Buhai. 
Also serving on the task force are 
Gretchen Naff, president of the Col- 
lege of Lake County, and two board 
members for the College of Lake 
County, Patricia Jones and Millicent 
Berliant The College of Lake County 
is one of the possible locations for 
the University Center. 



Others on the task force are Ed 
Gonwa, regional superintendent of 
schools for Lake County, Chuck 
Bartels, area manager for Manpow- 
er, businessman David Aho, and 
Tom Adams, mayor of Green Oaks 
and president of the Lake County 
Municipal League. Lake County 
Administrator Karl Nollenberger 
serves as an ex-officio member of 
the task force. 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome .They should be on topics of general 
Interest, approximately 250 words or less. All letters must be sighed,', 
and contain a home address and telephone number.The editor reserves ■ 
the right to condense all letters. 

Send letters to: Lakeland Newspapers, Attn: Letters to the Editor 
30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



• 




- -r»w— «.»...■ - Mifrra.Ti 1 1 " fc ' 1 ''""* ,,r T • i -rrojiim . 7i n — , M |i,i W p J |, „ x , < |__ 




January 1, 1999 



COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers COUNTY /C3 




AT A GLANCE 



A DIGESTOF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 






f. 

r 



■ 



i 



Results of census show growth 

Antloch— The Village of Antloch has announced the re- 
sults of a special census taken last summer. 

"The current, correct census count Is 7,093 people," said 
Mayor Marilyn Shlneflug. 

"Yes, the village is growing," said Antloch Director of Plan- 
ning, Zoning and Building Robert Silhan. "We have subdivi- 
sions in every sector of the community." 

"It's not all happening in one particular spot" 

The recent population rise can be traced to developments 
in the community that have been around for almost the entire 
decade. 

Heron Harbor, south of Antloch on Route 59, started 
about nine years ago. The development has seven phases. 

"We've only seen three of them," said Silhan. "I would ex- 
pect a proposed final play for the fourth phase in the next six 
months," he said. 

Tiffany Farms and Woods of Antloch, in northwest Antl- 
och on Tiffany Road, continue to be under construction. Ry- 
land Homes Is building Windmill Creek on Depot Street east 
of Antloch at . In the same area, Scarsdale Homes is building 
the Pine Hill Lakes subdivision. 

During the past year, Antloch 's Combined Plan and Zon- 
ing Commission evaluated two large proposed residential 
subdivisions— Landmark Pointe, on Antioch Lake, and Deer- 
crest, at Savage Road and Route 173, Both proposals will be 
resubmitted for consideration in 1999. 

Age, race discrimination suit filed 

Mundeleln— Two former Mundelein Park and Recre- 
ation District employees have filed a lawsuit in the U.S. Dis- 
trict Court in Chicago on Dec. 22, claiming they were victims 
of age and race discrimination. 

The suit was filed by Salvatore Macaluso, 55, of Franklin 
Park, who claimed the park district used federal money to fire 
him as its police department supervisor, and Ulysses "Pete" 
Beaudion, 50, of Glendale Heights, who alleges he was sub- 
jected to racial slurs and worked in a hostile environment due 
to his American Indian, Hispanic and Cajun descent. 

Park District Director Alex J. Marx said he had yet to re- 
ceive a copy of the lawsuit as of Dec. 28, but said the charges 
had no basis. Marx said Beaudion resigned in July, and 
Macaluso was released in March, following the Park District's 
Police Department's merger into the Mundelein Police De- 
partment. 

Library rewards high usage 

;; JW/aucondd— As a way to encourage more usage; and to 
become a part of the pre-MiUerinium. celebration, the Wau- 
conda Area Library has formed the Millennium Club for fre- 
quent users. "It is pur way of encouraging use of the library 
and thanking people for using the library," said Thomas Kern, 
library director, said. 

Everyone who reaches the 1,000 mark in checked out 
items between Aug. 25, 1997, and Jan. 1, 2000, will receive a 
certificate and a nominal prize. So far seven library card hold- 
ers have reached the 1,000 mark, with Lynn Harms of Wau- 
conda topping the list with 1,573 items as of Dec. 22. Kern be- 
lieves at least 200 people will become club members. 

Town waits for company reply 

Island Lake— If KN Energy of Lake wood , Col., wants to 
build a natural gas-fired power plant in Island Lake, it has to 
meet the satisfaction of the village board, or else. The compa- 
ny has yet to respond to a letter sent in Nov. 6 by Island Lake 
Mayor Charles R. Amrich, with a list of 18 questions regarding 
how the proposed plant on 141 acres north of Dowell Road 
and west of Darrell Road will impact the community's envi- 
ronment, property taxes and values, safety and water. 

The company applied Dec. 1 1 for a state air-quality permit 
for the'plant on the currently unincorporated land it seeks to 
annex to Island Lake. The permit is one of two needed from 
the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, and is related to 
having the lowest possible emissions from burning natural 
gas. 

Village collects on past due bills 

Fox Lake— Officials are calling the utility hearings held in 
mid-December for customers over-due on their bills a suc- 
cess. A total of 53 notices were sent to residences and busi- 
nesses who had utility bills for water or sewer services past, 
due with outstanding balances of $400 or more. 




/ ''. 



U 



Finally, snow! 

After a very mild winter,whlch.saw.rj§cord,high tern-, 
peratures in Lake County^ Illinois was hit witn the first 
snowfall, although minor, of the season. Local recre- 
ational areas such as Centennial Park in Grayslake 
were covered In a light dusting of snow as a post-hol- 
iday treat.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



"We started at roughly $37,000 worth of late notices," said 
Trustee J. Kevin Hunter, finance committee chairman. "We 
have collected over 50 percent of that." 

"In two years, the (finance) committee has not written off 
one bill," he said. The next step in collecting on past due no- 
tices is issuing shut-off notices. 

Prince of Peace to hold blood drive 

UndenJhurst— The Lake Villa Township Blood drive is 
this weekend. This rare Sunday blood drive is Jan. 3 from 8 a.m. 
to 1:30 p.m. at Prince of Peace Catholic Church at the comer of 
Grand Avenue (Route 132) and Milwaukee Avenue (Route 83). 

"Everybody's welcome," said John Hamlin. "We need 
donors, especially this time of the year, because there's not very 
many donors available during the holidays." 

"You don't need an appointment. Just come on in," he said. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, St Mark Lutheran 
Church, the Boy Scouts, and the Veterans of Foreign Wars are 
helping to build a good turnout. 

Mundelein makes plans for 1999 

Mundelein— The Village of Mundelein has several plans 
underway for the new year, including small shopping centers 
and road improvement projects. The village will be finishing 
construction on a new fire station to be located on Hickory 
Street. Officials also plan to begin searching for a potential lo- 



AjBppMg^Rt^ff ^ '■}>? * ' * 




___■_ 




cation for the new police station. 

According to Assistant Village Administrator Mike Flynn, 
the proposed university center is also high on the village's list 
He said Mundelein offers two sites that serve as good alterna- 
tives to the College of Lake County site. 

The University Center.Task Force will make a decision in 
February regarding the location of the university center. 

Church site the only option 

libcrtyvllie— The St Lawrence Episcopal Church/Liber- 
tyville Civic Center site is an attractive piece of property for a 
new Libertyville library. Availability of land sites holds the 
outcome of a library solution for the area. 

"It Is the only option out there, and it is a good option," 
said Cam Hock, vice president of the Cook Memorial Library 
Board. The board recently passed a resolution to ask the vot- 
ers in April for funds to build a library at the "new" site. 

Under the plan the village would acquire the church site 
package it with the Libertyville Civic Center and trade the cur- 
rent library site for the "new" site. The village could then use 
the existing library building as a new civic center. 

The church and current civic center would be torn down 
and a new library would be built. 

In a letter to parishioners Rev. Jedediah Holdorph of St. 
Lawrence's said the village had shown interest, but not yet 
macle an offer. St Lawrence's vacating its current location 
could depend on the relocation of St John's Lutheran 
Church,(on the comer of Garfield and Route 176), but the 
. churches have not yet met to discuss any deals. 

Conservancy seeks member 

Lake Villa— The Land Conservancy of Lake County Is 
looking for a student or volunteer, or both, to serve as chair of 
their Education and Environmental Committee. The person 
would be responsible far organizing and assisting students 
and members of the conservancy to promote issue aware- 
ness. 

This is an opportunity for a member of a community high 
school's environmental club to serve on a county-wide orga- 
nization protecting wetland areas and donated land parcels. 

Interested people are invited to call them at 356-6001. 

Independents seek life after NWSC 

Lake County— After the Northwest Suburban Confer- 
ence (NWSC) was dismantled three years ago, Grant High 
School in Fox Lake, Round Lake High School in and Waucon- 
t jda High School were left out in the cold,as ; the other members 
- of'tHe conference scrambled to become part of existing con- 
ferences. 

Over the past three weeks, numerous scenarios have 
come to light that would give the three independents a con- 
ference to call home. 

The two most obvious scenarios would be expansion of 
the North Suburban Conference (NSC) and expansion of the 
Fox Valley Conference (FVC). 

The NSC is comprised of eight teams and looking to ex- 
pand, while the FVC is also comprised often teams and has 
been talking expansion for nearly four years. 

The independent schools will be talking with athletic di- 
rectors in Lake County and beyond during the next six weeks 
to try and find a solution to the problem of being indepen- 
dent. A total of four plans exist, with the least-likely two in- 
volving all the schools north of Chicago or the Wisconsin 
schools near the state border. 

Arson fire investigation continues 

Fox Lake— A mysterious fire on Bay View Road is being 
investigated by the Lake County Sheriffs Department, Fox 
Lake Fire Chief Stu Hoehne said. 

According to Hoehne, the Fox Lake Fire Protection Dis- 
trict responded to the mysterious fire located at 25862 Bay 
View Road in Ingleside on Nov. 20 at 2:37 a.m. The cause of 
the fire was investigated by the Fox Lake Fire Department, but 
no conclusive evidence of arson was found on the site. 

The investigation has been turned over from the Fox 
Lake Fire Department investigators to the Lake County 
Sheriffs Department for further investigation into cir- 
cumstances surrounding the blaze. 

Due to the ongoing investigation, the Lake County 
Sheriffs Department is not releasing any information on 
the fire. 






Pick up any of Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 editions in coming 



ANGEL 

; ■■■:'■ 

KEEPS GIVING 

Car. dealer continues to' aid 
famllyin need. 



..- . ' -v , ■'".' --■;-.> 






INDEPENDENTS MOVING? 

Lake County's independent schools are lookir 
for conferences, and lakeland will examine 
what choices these schools; have 



FOREFRONTS 

LajceSand profilesi 
MO of the most j 
interesting people in ' 
Lake Countyln i this 
anriu&i special issue 




' 



C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



January 1, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers 

William H, Schroeder 

Publisher 



William M. Schroeder 

Prcsldont/CE.O. 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Edit or/Co mpoilt Ion Mgr. 



Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslakc, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. E-mail: edlt@Ind.com 



EDITORIALS 

Charter school 
battle to continue 

Despite a greenlight from the State Board of Education for the 
formation of Prairie Crossing School, Lake County likely will 
continue to be one of the battlegrounds in the effort to ad- 
vance the cause for expansion of charter schools in Illinois. 

Charter schools are legal entities to provide educational alterna- 
tives to public schools, authorized by the Illinois General Assembly to 
utilize tax monies for funding. The state board reversed stands taken 
by the boards of education of Woodland Elementary, Gages Lake, and 
Fremont Consolidated School of rural Mundelein, twice denying the 
application of the alternate school sought by a group of Grayslake par- 
ents. 

The charter school battle in Lake County has represented both 
ends of the spectrum, parents deeply committed to the philosophy of 
educational self determination vs. professional educators and school 
board officials deeply committed to preserving every tax dollar possi- 
ble for the public schools. 

Prairie Crossing Charter School will draw students from both ele- 
mentary districts. An enrollment of more than 300 students is envi- 
sioned by 2003. The school is expected to open in the fall of 1999 with 
about 60 students enrolled for kindergarten through second grade. 

Standing solidly in opposition to charter schools are Fremont 
Supt. Gary E. Mical and Woodland Supt. Dennis Conti, who see funds 
drawn off to operate Prairie Crossing Charter as seriously hurting the 
budgets of their schools. Douglas Parks, president of the Lake County 
Superintendents Association, finds fault with the funding mechanism 
for charter schools, and recommends a change in state law. His point 
is well taken, in our opinion. 

While legislators were partially motivated by a desire to foster in- 
novation in the educational process by authorizing 45 charter schools 
statewide in 1996, they probably underestimated the zeal of profes- 
sionals and bureaucrats to protect the status quo. Local school 
boards have life and death control over charter applications, unless 
the State Board is willing to intervene as in the Lake County case. 
With money being the overriding consideration, it isn't likely that the 
public school establishment will share willingly any of its financial re- 
sources or look kindly on future applications. 

If the charter school movement is to continue to move forward, 
legislation will be necessary to modify the funding process and re- 
move the heavy grip held on approval by local boards of education. If 
legislators aren't willing to do this, wonder arises why they authorized 
charter schools in the first place? 



Junior golf gets 
home of its own 

Anew dimension — a nine hole junior golf course — is being 
added to the golf offerings in Lake County, already among 
me most complete and modem in the nation with 60 cours- 
es plus driving ranges. 

With support of a national organization, the scaled-down nine- 
hole par three course will be constructed at Hastings Lake YMCA lo- 
cated between Lindenhurst and Lake Villa. In larid area, Hastings 
Lake Y is the largest YMCA in the Chicago metro area. Nothing will be 
missing from the junior layout which will be illuminated and include 
putting and chipping greens, a practice tee and a pro-shop. 

Already featuring such enticing activities for children as both in- 
door and outdoor swimming, camping and horseback riding, Hast- 
ings Lake Y is benefiting from efforts of the World Golf Federation, a 
consortium of professionals, to nurture interest of small fry in golf 
through the First Tee Program offering seed money to communities 
and service organizations agreeing to help advance junior golf. 

Hastings Lake Y leaders are to be commended for the courage to 
tackle die innovative project which could cost approximately $700,000 
when completed. A steering committee is being organized to mar- 
shal all me skills needed to bring die golf course to fruition. 

As we understand First Tee, there's a lot more to the program than 
producing Tiger Woods wannabees. First Tee has discovered young- 
sters improve their grades at the same time they learn how to correct a 
slice. Anyone who ever has swung a golf club knows that golf teaches 
honesty, integrity, patience, self control and etiquette besides proving 
that a sweet swing beats brute force. 

We only hope youngsters appreciate how lucky they are to have 
parents with the intelligence and foresight to make their home in a 
golfing mecca like Lake County. 



VIEWPOINT 



Party differences 
clarified in Congress 



Blase and bored Americans 
like to say that there's no 
difference between the two 
major political parties. 
They forever may be stilled on the 
basis of the pre-Christmas happen- 
ings in Congress. There can be no 
argument that impeachment of 
President Clinton was a defining 
moment in American history. 

Yet Americans, among them 
some of your neighbors here in Lake 
County, ill., still are arguing that im- 
peachment was improper. Their 
line of reasoning rests basically in 
the belief that sexual trysts in the 
White House are not an impeach- 
able offense. Maybe so. 

But lying under oath and abuse 
of power are other matters. So is up- 
holding the Constitution and adher- 
ence to the rule of law. Members of 
one party upheld constitutional tra- 
ditions while elected representatives 
from the other held to the social 
mores of the 1960s Sexual Revolu- 
tion. 

Perhaps we shouldn't have been 
shocked that the Lake County Re- 
publican Federation was flooded 
with calls from local Republicans 
angered by the votes in Congress 
implementing two counts of im- 
peachment. Obviously the angry 
GOP voters are not Clinton support- 
ers. What then? One possible con- 
clusion is that participation in the 
freedoms of the '60s was a bi-parti- 
san endeavor. ■ ■ •■ i;j.",j 

The emotions of the moment " 
will dissipate. Lake County Repub-. . 
lican leaders can be advised not to 
take too seriously charges received 
at the Federation office in Liber- 
tyville mat callers will punish their 
party by voting Democratic in the 
future. Americans have short fus- 
es — and even shorter memories. 

Besides a defining event of polit- 
ical principals, the impeachment 
proceedings can be also be framed 
as the most telling evidence that the 
pendulum regarding the impor- 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



tance of character in public office 
holders is swinging back. Nine 
years ago the media elite insisted 
that character is secondary to pro- 
grams, promises and potential in as- 
pirants for the White House. Now 
we are being told by the same media 
voices that character and personal 
integrity are foremost qualities. Bill 
Clinton is no target of a biased me- 
dia, but he can be seen as the ex- 
treme point of a cultural pendulum 
that is swinging back to individual 
accountability and higher moral 
standards. 

Remnants of the Sexual Revolu- 
tion may not see what's happening, 
but the clarity of changing times un- 
doubtedly will be brought home to 
them in the coming months as have 
some telling differences between 
Republicans and Democrats. 

Clauser gone 

Lake Zurich Police Chief Fred 
Clauser's last official day on the job 
was Dec. 31, marking the end of a 
tenuous tenure during which he 
tried to eliminate politics from the 
department and wound up being on 
the outs with everyone. 

The department is being run by 
an interim chief while a search takes 
place for a permanent chief. 

Short list 

Texas Gov. George W. Bush, Mis- 



souri Sen. John Ashcroft and U.S. 
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) are on 
the short list for keynote speaker at 
the Lake County Republican Federa- 
tion annual spring dinner Friday, 
April 30, at Marriott Lincolnshire. 

The event is a combination 
high-tone political rally and big- 
time fund raiser. 

More substations? 

County officials are cautious dis- 
cussing whether the new Sheriff's 
Substation in Long Grove will be a 
harbinger of more branches. 

Long Grove is among smaller 
villages that contract with the sheriff 
for police protection rather than op- 
erate a department. 

Nino in Florida 

One of the mainstays ofTaylor 
Street Cafe, now reduced to rubble 
to make way for an upscale hotel on 
the shores of Lake Zurich, won't be 
part of the new look taking shape 
under Jim Kelsey. Nino Despota, 
Jim's faUier-in-law and former busi- 
ness partner, is involved in a family 
deli business in Florida. Nino left 
behind a legacy of wonderful old 
world Italian recipes and a knack for 
hospitality that marked Taylor Street 
as one of the county's top eateries. ' . 

The new business has been 
named the Beverly Hotel in honor of 
Nino's late wife, Beverly Despota, 
who died four years ago. It will open 
In the fall of 1999. 

■ 

Crosses abound 

With Buffalo Grove atheist Bob 
Sherman strangely silent, more 
white crosses shown brighdy this 
holiday season than ever before, es- 
pecially in Wauconda where the 
Christmas cross ruckus started sev- 
eral years ago. 

Possibly a mark of good eco- 
nomic times, there were many more 
elaborate home decorations this 
year. Did you notice? 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Who will actually pay for mall? 



About six years ago, my wife 
and I relocated from the 
Chicago area to Austin, 
Tex., for professional rea- 
sons. After living there a couple of 
years, radical development was pro- 
posed that would allegedly benefit 
the community. 

The primary "benefit" that was 
presented was: increased tax rev- 
enues, That was a great marketing 
ploy by the developer, because the 
proposal— similar to the Hawthorn 
Woods/North Barrington Mall pro- 
posed by tiie Taubman Company- 
was approved. 

My wife and I now live in 
Hawthorn Woods. One of me rea- 
sons that we decided to move back 
to the Chicago area— and specifical- 
ly Hawthorn Woods— was the fact 
that nobody mentioned who would 
be financing the new development 
in that Texas community— the exist- 
ing taxpayers. Our taxes were to in- 
crease radically for a minimum of 30 
years. 

I am not suggesting that our tax- 
es will actually increase if the mall is 
built, but please realize that the mall 
will cost us in many ways, including 
decreased property values, in- 
.i creased traffic, increased crime, and 



radically increased township expen- 
ditures. Anybody who thinks that 
their taxes will decrease, or that the 
proposed Taubman mall will pre- 
vent a revenue deficit in their com- 
munity needs to think again. 

I don't want to move again, so 
let's all get behind this issue, and 
stomp it out for good. I invite all res- 
idents of Hawthorn Woods and Bar- 
rington to get involved and to speak 
out against this issue. This will affect 
all of us, no matter how close or far 
we happen to live from the pro- 
posed Taubman mall. 

Dave Clasen 
Hawthorn Woods 

Thanks for support 

Over the course of the past few 
months, many people— both young 
and old, individually and by groups 
have collectively come together to 
help those less fortunate. All of these 
people have graciously taken time 
out of tiieir own busy holiday sched- 
ules to help those in need. On behalf 
of Vernon Township and all of the 
needy families, I would like to thank 
everyone who helped to make this a 
joyous holiday season. It brings me 
great joy to know there are so many 
peoplewillingtogive from the* 



goodness of their hearts. 

There were many objectives, .. 
which were achieved this season. A 
coundess number of boxes and bags 
of food were donated to our food 
pantry, which is a year round project 
to help those who may need it. Our 
"Adopt-a-Family" program was very 
successful again this year. We were 
able to service 70 families whose ex- 
pressions showed their appreciation 
more Uian words ever could. It is be- 
cause of your on going generosity 
that we care able to service so many 
people. 

Once again, I would like to say 
"Thank You" for all of your support 
and efforts. From all of here at Ver- 
non Township, we wish you and 
your family a wonderful 1999. 

William E.Peterson 
Vernon Township Supervisor 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome. 
They should be on topics of gener- 
al interest, approximately 250 
words or less. All letters must be 
signed, and contain a home ad- 
dress and telephone number. • 
The editor reserves the right to . 
condense all letters. • 



*m 



■ ^' ■ ^ ■■> ■■ ■! ■ J w j ^*-"*^ r . TJ , fc ^r 



:»HW"WW* 



January 1, 1999 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C5 






« 



'. 



PARTY LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 





Churchill: Does a 
cabinet post await? 




Ryan: Victory party 
planned to thank ' 
supporters 



LaBelle: Style 
should bring board 
together 




There will be a red carpet of 
welcome extending out 
from Gurnee Holiday Inn 
Thursday, Jan. 28, for newly 
elected Gov. George Ryan and in- 
coming Lt Gov. Corinne Wood at a 
Republican love-in designed to - 
thank GOP loyalists. 

Ryan and Wood will be in atten- 
dance from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at an un- 
precedented victory party. "We want 
to thank everyone who worked so 
hard in the November election," ex- 
claimed Antonletta Slmonlan, ex- 
ecutive director of the Lake County 
Republican Federation. 

Simonian emphasized that this 
, is not a fund raising event) Tickets of 
$15 per person or $25 for two have 
been priced to cover expenses only. 

Pushing for probe 

Winthrop Harbor Mayor 
Robert Loy still is pushing to pun- 
ish all alleged wrongdoers in a previ- 



ous administration. Loy isn't happy 
that State's Attorney Mike Waller 
has refused to get involved, but he 
considers Waller's decision only a 
minor setback. 

Loy sees former Mayor Robert 
Marabella covering up illegal wire- 
tapping by former Police Chief Men 
Miller. The village has a big bill— 
$10,000 apiece— to pay 67 plaintiffs 
in a civil rights suit growing out of 
Miller's management 

Future regulator? 

Democrat observers (who 
keep track of such things) say for- 
mer State Rep. Bob Churchill is 

going to wind up with a high rank- , 

ing post in the Illinois Department 
that regulates banks. Officially, 
Churchill is concentrating on his 
law practice. 

Heading home 

Lee Szymborskf , assistant vil- 



Hillary h 

year than Bill had 




lage manager of Buffalo Grove, will 
leave after 11 years to become Feb. 
1, city administrator of Mequon, 
Wis., a suburb of Milwaukee, Wis. 
Szymborski is a native ofWisconsin, 
graduating from the University of - 
Wisconsin-Milwaukee and working 
for the City of Wauwatosa, Wis. and 
Milwaukee County, Wis. before lo- 
cating at Buffalo Grove. 

'Silent Steve' 

The go-along style of County -'- 
Board Rep. Stevenson Mountsler 

(R-Barrington) means that he 
. should adapt quickly to the leader- ' 
ship of County Board Chairman ) Im 
taBeUe (R-ZIori); Elected from ah 4 '" 
area advancing open space and en- 
vironmental ism, MountsierTeli-In" 
with trie go-go-gang of previous ad- 
ministrations, supporting pro- 
growth policies. It's not MountsierV 
nature to make speeches or offer ex- 
planations of how he votes. 



Back in 1939, Winston 
Churchill described Russia 
as "a riddle wrapped In a 
mystery inside an enigma." 

It's a definition that today might 
fit Hillary Rodham Clinton, 

While I have been Interested in 
women for many years, I would be 
the first to admit 1 know precious lit- 
tle about them. They can be hard to 
figure out 

English playwright WUIiam Con- 
greve, the Nell Simon of his time, 
wrote 300 years ago that "hell has no 
fury like a woman scorned." That 
warning has been passed down 
through generations for three cen- 
turies. 

Another maxim to remember Is 
that a man never knows what a 
woman Is thinking by the way she 
smiles at him. 

Time magazine last week devot- 
ed its annual "Man of the Year" cover 
story to a couple of dubious achiev- 
ers: Bill Clinton and Kenneth Starr. 
SaidTime: "Clinton did something 
ordinary; he had an affair and lied 
about it Starr did something extraor- 
dinary; he took the President's low- 
life behavior and called it a high 
crime. One man's loss of control in- 
spired the other's, and we are no bet- 
ter for anything either of them did." 

Couldn't Time find better candi- 
dates for "Man of the Tear"? Or, why 
not make the cover story, "Woman 
of the Year"? Hillary Clinton had a 
much better year than Bill had. 

People magazine, meanwhile, 
featured Hillary among "The 25 
most intriguing people of the year," 
along with the likes of Mark McG-/ 
wire, Michael J. Fox, Oprah Winfrey < 
' and Leonardo DICaprlo. 

Said People: "Had she publicly 
turned against her husband, his 
. presidency would have ended 
months ago. And it quoted another; 
magazine, Vogue, as saying, "She is 
simply smarter than anybody 
around her." 




THE 




CORNER 

JerryPfarr 



All through this trying year, it 
has been reported; Hillary lived by a 
motto from Eleanor Roosevelt "A 
woman is like a tea bag. You never 
know how strong it is until it's in hot 
water." 

And Hillary's "approval ratings" 
have climbed from 40 to 70 percent 

But why do pollsters keep foist- 
ing approval ratings upon us? How 
would we ordinary folks like to 
awaken in the morning to hear the 
media report that a sizable percent- 
age of the predators In that jungle 
out there don't approve of us? 

Well, who cares? As Dr. Wayne 
Dyer said in his book, "Your Erro- 
neous Zones," needing or seeking 
approval is tantamount to saying, 
"Your view of me is more important 
than my own opinion of myself." 

Dyer says, contrary to that sappy 
old song, "People who need people 
are the unluckiest people in the 
world." 

Woody Allen, one of the Clin- 
tons ■ many entertainment-world 
friends, said the other day, "We have 
a good president who is being perse- 
cuted by the extreme right for hav- 
ing an affair with a consenting adult. 
Which, by the way, his wife seems to 
accept" 
" Yes, "seems to." 

NewYprkradio and television 
personality Don Imus, pondering a 
recent photo from Jerusalem of the 
'. Clintons posing piously by the grave 
of Mideast peace advocate Yitzhak 
Rabin, suggested: "She probably 
' wishes the grave was still open, so 
she could push him in." 




Are pro sports contracts going 




I realize that most of my 
columns deal with government, 
but there are matters unrelated 
to government that often have 
as much of an affect on our every- 
day life. One came to my mind 
about a week ago when I had my car 
radio tuned to the Bob Collins show. 
Collins asked his listeners who they 
thought the person is who can be 
considered the "most powerful" over 
the field of sports. 

* Like most listeners, I thought 
immediately of Michael Jordan, or 
Sam Sosa, or Mark Magulre. But, 
Collins said that It was someone 
who you would never think of, and 
he added don't forget, he said "most 
powerful," not the person who 
might be the most popular. That 
caught me at a loss, so I thought I'd 
just wait for the answer. 

As much of a surprise to me, and 
also to Bob Collins, one of his listen- 
ers called quickly with the correct 
answer. The most powerful person 
in sports is the media mogul, Rupert 
Murdoch. He owns major sports 
teams, but his bigger power and in- 
fluence over sports comes from his 
ownership of the Fox Network. The 
Fox Sports Network has grown leaps 
and bounds since it surprisingly' 
outbid the CBS network a few years 
back to air the National Football 
League games. 

A week later, I opened my Sun- 
day newspaper and turned to the 
first page of the sports section to 
read that the baseball Los Angeles 
. Dodgers have signed star pitcher 




SEEING 

IT 

THROUGH 

JohnS.Matijevich 



Kevin Brown to a seven year con- 
tract worth $105 million dollars, or 
$15 million a year. To the baseball 
player, I guess I can say "get all that 
you can but I must also join most 
Americans, even those who follow 
nothing in sports, who are saying, 
■'what's going on?" or "how far can 
this go?" 

Guess who owns the Los Ange- 
les Dodgers. That Bob Collins listen- 
er would get it right away. You got it. 
None other than Rupert Murdoch. 

It wasn't too long ago that the 
sport of baseball was teetering at the 
brink because of the baseball strike. 
Many fans, myself included, said 
that baseball "can go scratch." We 
meant it and we stayed away for 
awhile. But, Sammy Sosa, Maguire, 
and our own gullibility, brought us 
back. 

When baseball and football 
were going through their owner vs. 
players money problems, many 
were saying, why donVthose sports 
follow the lead of professional bas- 
ketball that seemed to avoid the 
salary difficulties that rose to player 
strikes. Well, we can't say that any- 
more, arid the NBA lockout. Jopms^s, , 



an issue that may cripple the sports 
so that even Michael Jordan may not 
be enough to bring it back. 

What all of this means is, that 
big money is corrupting sports just 
as it can corrupt other things. We ."■■ 
can put the blame on the media In- 
fluence on sports, or we can blame it 
on the commercialization of sports, 
or we can blame it on the indiffer- 
ence of both owners and players to- 
wards the fans, who really pay the 
bills. There is enough blame, to go 
around. 

It can also be said that, when 
everything is said and done, the real 
blame falls on the fans. I mentioned * 
that we turned back to baseball be- 
cause we are gullible. There Is that . 
urge among fans to be with a winner 
and we never give up. After over six 
decades as a Cubs fan, I can say that ' 
"we never give up." 

But, there must come a time 
when our loyalty to a team and our 
loyalty to a sport must be appreciat- 
ed. How any sport can endure when 
ticket prices soar to a level that fans 
eventually must say "lVe had It," I 
can't predict Baseball was always 
called America's favorite pastime be- 
cause you could afford to take your 
family to a game. So, young kids grew 
up to be fans. It has become beyond 
the reach of ordinary families. 

Commercialization of sports has 
taken over. The corporations have 
taken over expensive sky-boxes. 
Baseball stadiums are named after .' 
large corporations, even though tax- 
payers pay so me of the tab. That t ; , 



would be something if they called a 
newly built stadium "Taxpayer Sta- 
dium." They have even found a way 
that advertisements can be super- 
imposed on television screens. The 
day may come when The ivy in 
Cubs Park will be blotted over on 
our TV set with some beer advertise- 
ment 

I believe. that fans are finally get- 
ting it up to their necks. Every pro- 
fessional sports player is "hitting the 
lottery," and it's getting bigger all of 
the time. The sports owners are just 
as greedy. That's not even to say how 



gambling has corrupted sports at 
every level, professional and ama- 
teur. . 

I believe that the most repeated 
phrase that I have heard people say 
in recent time is "What's this world 
coming to?" For the most part, many 
have been saying it because of what 
is happening in government The 
sports world, too, Is helping make 
that phrase uttered more than ever. 
While owners and players never 
seem to have enough, the fans are 
rightly saying "ENOUGH IS 
ENOUGH." 



Where to Write 
Representatives 



U.S. Representatives 

Philip Crane (R) 

8th Congressional Dlst. 
11 00 W. Northwest Hwy. 
Palatine, IL 60067 
233 Cannon House 
Office Btdg. 
Washington, DC 2051 5 < 

State Senators 

Adeline Geo-Karis (R) 

31st Senatorial Dist 
2612 Sheridan Rd., 
Suite 213 
Zlon, IL 60099 
323 State House 
Springfield, IL 62706 



State Representatives 



Mark Beaublen (R) 

52nd Representative Dlst. 
124 A East Liberty St. 
Wauconda, IL 60084 
Room 2108 -N 
N-WIng Stratton Bldg. 
Springfield, IL 62706 

Lauren Beth Gash (D) 

60th Representative Dist. 
108WIImotRd.. 
Suite 210 
Deerfield. IL60015 
2098-M Stratton Bldg. 
Springfield, IL 62706 






OBITUARIES 



C6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



January 1, 1999 



A FUneral Home Serving 
All Your Needs 

Over 50 Years Of Caring, Dignified Service 



W. ni jis* 







Family Owned & Staffed 



♦> 



Traditional Services 



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Pre-Planning ♦ Cremation Services 
Serving McHenry & Lake Counties 
Out Of State Arrangements ♦> All Faiths 
♦ Available 24-Hours A Day 

KK. HAMSHER 

Funeral Home Ltd. 



847-587-2100 



XT 



815-385-1001 



12 N. PISTAKEE LAKE RD • FOX LAKE 
1 BLOCK WEST OF RT. 12-1/2 BLOCK NORTH OF GRAN 



DEATH NOTICES 



CISEK 

Teresa A. Cisek, (nee Hlgdon), age 71, of 

Mundelcin 

Arr: Kristan Funeral Home PC, Mundclein 

KUEKING 

Frederick A. Kueking, age 70 of Wauconda 
Arr: Ahlgrim and Sons Funeral Home, Lake 
Zurich 

DASHER 

Selmn 'Sally' Dasher, age 70, formerly of 



Libertyville 

Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 

Libertyville 

WILSON 

Ruth M. Wilson, age B9 of Lake Zurich 
Arr: Ahlgrim and Sons Funeral Home, Lake 
Zurich 

WELLNER 

LoRoy W. Wellner, Sr„ age 75 of Barrington 
Arr: Windridge Funeral Home, Ltd., Gary 



The Deadline 

for Obituaries & Death Notices 

is lO a.m. on Tuesdays. 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Funeral Directory 



r i 



JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court (Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen, Jeffrey Jordan, Directors 

Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K.Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

\ 1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 
Dan Dugenske, Director 
(847). 395-4000 

SPRING GROVE FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd.Y P.O. Box 65, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Kurk P. Paleka, Director 

(815) 675-0550 or Toll Free (888) 394-8744 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director 



George J. Bury 

Age 73 of Rockford, formerly of Lake Villa, passed 
away on Tuesday, Dec. 22, 1998 at the Hlghview 
Retirement Home in Rockford. He was born on Chicago 
on Dec. 27, 1924, the son of John and Josephine Bury. He 
resided in Lake Villa for nearly 45 years. He was an active , 
member of the Catholic Church. He was also an active 
member of the Boy Scouts and the Power Squadron. He 
was a member of the MENSA and Triple Nines. He was 
the Chief Engineer at Llcon Switch Company, where he 
designed switches, which were used in the Apollo 
Missions. 

In life, as well as death, loved ones surrounded him. 
His children, Shcryl Hofkamp, Georjannc (James) 
Mortcnsen and Graham Bury survive him. His grand- 
children,- Michael Hofkamp, Heidi Hofkamp, Phillip 
Mortcnsen, Glen Martensen, Brittany Bury and Brlanna 
Bury. Also surviving arc his sister, Joan (Dr. Joseph) 
Strzyz and brother, Edwin Bury. His wife June and a 
daughter, Dr. Lonna Bury, preceded him In death. 

Funeral services, were at Ringa Funeral Home, Lake 
Villa. A Funeral Mass was held at the Prince of Peace 
Catholic Church, Lake Villa- 
Private interment was held at Hillside Cemetery, 
Antioch. 

Memorials would be appreciated to the American 
Heart Association or Masses at Prince of Peace Church, 
Lake Villa. 

Ivanetta May Walsh 

Age 94, a longtime Big Hollow and Fox Lake resi- 
dent, died on Monday, Dec. 21, 1998 In Libertyville, She 
was born on Feb. 5, 1904, the daughter of the late 
Wallace and Anna Dcno Hewitt. 

Surviving ore two daughters, Shirley Magenta of 
inglcslde and Pain (Richard) Lahey of Grayslake; four 
grandsons, Keith, William, Robert and Steve; four grand 
daughters, Deborah, Kathy, Michelle and Renec; 11 
great grandchildren; nieces, nephews and other rela- 
tives. Mrs. Walsh is preceded in death by one brother 
Russell Hewitt and by one sister. 

Private services were conducted for the family. 

A Memorial Service will be announced at a later 
date. 

Arrangements have been completed by the K. K. 
Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the 
Lake). 

Minnie E. Lane 

Age 00 of Mc Henry passed away Monday, Dec. 21, 
1998 at Alden Terrace Health Care Center In McHenry, 
She was born Aug. 21, 1918 In Central City, Ky. to Robert 
and Minnie Phillips. She retired from Chicago Metallic 
In 1983. She married Lloyd W. Lane, who died on May 17, 
1987. 

Survivors include three children, Steve (Marlettc) 
Lane of Johnsburg, Debbie Lane of McHenry and Barb 
(Lou) Marotta of Spring Grove; ,13 grandchildren; six 
great grandchildren; eight great, great grandchildren; 
sister, Nina Mac Phillips of Kentucky. She is preceded In 
death by her parents, her husband, and 10 brothers and 
sisters. 

Funeral Services were held at Querhammer Funeral 
Home in Crystal Lake with Rev. Arnold D. Schaper, offi- 
ciating. 

Interment was at Rlngwood Cemetery In Ringwood. 

Arlene B. Duda (nee Weinberg) 

Age 61, a Fox Lake resident for the past six years and 
a former resident of Riverwoods, died on Dec. 22, 1998, 
following a automobile accident on Route 12 In 
Wauconda. She was born on March 16, 1937 at Chicago, 
the daughter of the late Edward Meinbcrg and Victoria 
Lech Meinbcrg. Mrs. Duda was a member of the Lake 
County Mounted Posse and the Gated Calvary. 

Survivors include her husband Ferdinand • G. 
Rebechinl of Fox Lake; one son, Mark S. Duda of Eau 
Claire, Wis.; one daughter, Cyndcc (Dr. Michcal) 
Maxwell of Tulsa, Okla. Five grandchildren survive, 
Brian David, Christopher, Cathy, Claire and Marisc; one 
brother, Arnold (Mary) Meinbcrg of Bristol, Wis,; one 
sister, Marlcne of New Jersey; nieces and nephews and , 
her very dear friend, Ignatius J, Duda. She is preceded in 
death by a son, Brian A. Duda. 

Family and friends visited at the K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake) 

A Funeral mass was celebrated at St. Bcdc Catholic 
Church, Inglcslde. 

Interment was at Ascension Cemetery, Libertyville. 

Dorothy McAvoy 

Age 75 of Antioch, passed away on Tuesday, Dec, 22, 
1998 at Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan. She was 
born Dec, 18, 1923 In Chicago, the daughter of the late 
Michael and Elizabeth (Slupski) Bronars. She was a 
member of St. Peter Church, Antioch, and the Council of 
Catholic Women. Dorothy was very active at the Antioch 
\ Senior Center and enjoyed the karate and line dancing 
activities there. She had worked as a secretary for. the 
Catholic Order of Foresters in Chicago and later.for 
Union Oil in Rolling. Meadows." On July 10, 1948,'shc 
married John McAvoy In Chicago. 

Survivors include her husband, John; three sons, 
John (Joanlo) of Lisle, Michael (Joan) of Crystal Lake, 
and Tom (Angela) of Paddock Lake. Wis.; two brothers, 
Richard (Lillian). Bronars of Medlnah, Danny Bronars of 



Eagle River, Wis.; three sisters, Patricia (Henry) Darwlt of 
Mt. Prospect, Phyllis (Richard) Crooks of Pcnsacola, Fla. 
and Mary Ann (Leroy) Elchbcrger of Houston, Tex. and 
nine grandchildren, Shawn, Erin, Michael, Christopher, 
Molly, Daniel, Kelly, Megan and Shannon. She is preced- 
ed In death by two brothers, Leonard and George and 
one sister, Henrietta. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial was , 
held at St. Peter Church, Antioch. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral 
Home, Antioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Frank J* Wrobel 

Age 75, a resident of Inglcslde since 1953, formerly 
of Chicago, died Friday, Dec. 25, 1998 at the Northern 
Illinois Medical Center In McHenry. He was born on Feb. 
13, 1923 In Chicago to Andrew and Mary {Nee Pempek) 
Wrobel and was a veteran having served In the U.S. 
Army in the Phllllplne Islands during WWII. Mr. Wrobel 
had been a Deputy Sheriff with the Lake County Sheriffs 
Police for 20 years before retiring, and was a member of 
the Federal Organization of Police. He was devoted 
member of St. Bcdc Catholic Church for 45 years, serv- 
ing as Church usher and head usher. He was a 4th 
Degree member of St. Bcdc X 10 Plus Council 3788, serv- 
ing twice as Past Grand Knight. He was a member of ^ 
Bishop Quarter Assembly, and was proud to have acted 
as Santa Claus for 40 years at the church's Christmas 
parties. Mr. Wrobel was also a member of the Lakes 
Region American Legion Post 703 of Fox Lake. 

Survivors include; three daughters, Mary (David). 
Holem of Spring Grove, Margaret (Joseph) Cummings of 
Inglcslde, and Susan (David) Wolford of Kenosha, Wis.; 
five grandchildren, Joshua, Sarah, and Rachacl Wolford, 
all of Kenosha, Wis., Kristlna and Katherlnc Cummings, 
both of inglcslde; his godchild, Kathy Rckar of Ingleside; 
his very dear friend, Evelyn Jercb of Round Lake Park; 
two sister-in-laws, Esther Wrobel of California and 
Frances Wrobel of Bcnsenvillc; many nieces, nephews 
and other relatives, also many friends. He Is preceded In 
death by his wife, Betty Jean (nee Drake) Wrobel, who 
passed away on Dec. 11, 1996. They had been united In 
marriage on June 17, 1950; and by four brothers, John, 
Joe, Stanley and Andrew and by two sisters, Sophie and 
Irene. 

Friends and family visited at the K. K, Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake ( The Chapel on the Lake) and 
The American Legion held ihelr services there. 

The Funeral Mass was held at St. Bede Catholic 
Church, Inglcslde. 

Interment was at St. Mary's Cemetery, Fremont 
Center. 

Memorials for the Church will be appreciated by the 

family, 

Kenneth II. Rentner < ., > 

Age 64 of Antioch, passed away Wednesday, Dec. 23, 
1998, suddenly while at work in Urbapa. he was born 
Oct. 9, 1934 in Antioch, the son of the late Henry and 
Freda (Bolton) Rentner and has been a life long resident. 
He graduated from Antioch High School and was active 
In sports. Aftet;high school he served in the U.S.. navy 
SEABEES, during the Korean Conflict. He returned to 
Antioch and was a member of St. Stephen Lutheran 
Church, the Antioch Rescue Squad and the AARP, Ken 
was a truck driver for Jewel Foods and a member of the 
Teamsters Union Local 710 In Chicago. In his spare time 
he enjoyed woodworking. On Nov. 12, 1955, he married 
Nancy Hoft In Bcrwyn. 

Survivors include his wife, Nancy; two daughters, 
Diana Rentner Engqulst and Debra Rentner Seibel, both 
of Antioch; two sons, William (Joan Johnson) Rentner 
and Robert (Dcanna) Rentner, both of Salem, Wis.; his 
mother, Freda Rentner of Antioch; four grandchildren, 
Wayne Engquist, Vanessa Engquist, Bryan Seibel and 
Brendan Rentner. He Is preceded in death by his father, 
Henry Rentner in 1982 and his sister Adella Bolton In 
199B. 

Funeral Services were held at. the Strang Funeral 
Home of Antioch. 

Interment was at Liberty Cemetery, Saiera 
Township, Wis. 

Those desiring, may make contributions to the fam- ■ 
Lly, in care of the First National Bank, Employee Owned, 
. 485 Lake St., Antioch, IL 60002, In his memory. 

Dorothy A. Leahle 

Age 77 of Antioch, passed away Friday, Dec. 25, 1998 
at Lake Forest Hospital, Lake Forest. She was born June 
11, 1921 and has been a lifelong resident of Lake County. 
Her work Included helping her parents operate the for- 
mer Castle Tavern at Routes 173 and 45 and she and her 
husband, Lloyd operated the Old Hickory Tavern also at 
Routes 173 and 45, for many years, She was active as a 
volunteer, for the Antioch Mental Health. TjirlfrShop and 
a member of the AARP. On Sept. 28, 1946, she married j 

Lloyd E, Leablein Antioch and he preceded her. In death 
on April 17,1984. \ 

She Is, survived by her mother, Dolly- Spierlng of 
Ltndenhurst -and several other relatives and dear 
friends; In addition to her husband she is preceded In 
deatlvby her father, Clarence Spierlng In, 1 983. „ 

As per her wishes, a simple Graveside Service was 

Please see page C7, 




I 



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January 1, 1999 



OBITUARIES/LEGAL NOTICES' 



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held at Hickory Union Cemetery, 
Newport Township with the Rev, Paul 
Meltzer of the Mlllburn 
Congregational Church, officiating. 

Interment followed. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may 
be made to the American Cancer 
Society, In her memory. 

Arrangements were entrusted to 
the Strang Funeral Home of Antloch. 

Diane J. Eckholm 

Age 70 of Gurnce, passed away 
Saturday, Dec. 26, 1998 at St.' Luke 
Hospital, Milwaukee, Wis. She was 
born Dec. 19, 1928 In Evanston, the 
daughter of the late Vincent and 
Lillian (Fink) Eckholm. Before moving 
to Gurnee-in 1986, she lived In 
Chicago, where she taught at St. 
Jerome Grade School. She later 
worked as a claims manager for the 
TrustMark Insurance Co., in Lake 
Forest, retiring In 1993. She was a very , 
devoted member of St, Ignatius 
Episcopal Church in Antloch and was 
a sacristan and lector. 

Survivors include her brother, 
Rev. Vincent ]. Eckholm; rector of St. 
Ignatius Episcopal Church of Antloch 
and her sister, Shirley Eckholm with 
whom she made her home in Gurnee. 

Visitation was held at St. Ignatius 
Episcopal Church, Antloch, with 
Requiem Mass also held. 

Interment was at All Saints 
Cemetery, Des Plaines. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may 
be made to St. Ignatius Episcopal 
Church building fund, in her memo- 
ry 

Funeral arrangements were 
entrusted to the Strang Funeral Home 
, of Antioch. 

Eugene G. Kolodzinski Sr. 

Age 75 of Round Lake Beach, died 



Friday, Dec. 25, 1998 at St. Therese 
Hospital In Waukegan. He was born 
March 2, 1923 In Chicago to Stanley 
and Anna Dollgalc Kolodzinski. On 
May 11, 1951, he married Victoria 
Murphy in Chicago. He was aj-csldcnt 
of Round Lake Beach for 42 years, and 
a member of St. Joseph Church, in 
Round Lake. He was employed by 
Advance Circuitry Systems of Round 
' Lake Beach for six years. Formerly, he 
was warehouse manager for BVI of 
Grayslake, and also employed by 
inland Bedding Co. of Chicago. He 
was a veteran of the U.S. Army and 
served in the European Theatre dur- 
ing WWII. He was a member of' the 
American Legion Post 1170 of Round 
Lake. An avid golfer and fisherman, he 
also enjoyed oil painting as a longtime 
hobby. 

Mr. Kolodzinski Is survived by six 
children, Eileen (Claudlo) Umlauf of 
Round Lake Beach, Carol (George) 
Glider of Houston, Tex., Diane (Mike) 
Smoot of Uxbridge, Mass., Eugene G. 
(Ramona) Kolodzinski Jr. of 
Machesny Park, Richard Kolodzinski 
of Round Lake Beach, and Arthur 
(Robin) Kolodzinski, also of Round 
Lake Beach; 14 grandchildren; six 
great grandchildren; four brothers 
and a sister. He is preceded in death 
by his parents; his wife, Victoria on 
Dec. 5, 1998; and four brothers and 
sisters. 

Visitation was held at Justens 
Round Lake Funeral Home. 

A Funeral Mass was held at St, 
Joseph Church, Round Lake. 

Interment was private! 

Beverly Hensley Boettge 

Age 45 of Antioch, passed away 
Tuesday, Dec. 15, 1998 in Antioch. She 
was born Jan. 26, 1953 in Harlan 
County, Ky.,' the daughter of the 
Roosevelt and Helen (Middieton) 




Daniels. She lived In Wauconda and 
Fox Lake areas before moving to 
Antloch recently. She was a hairdress- 
er and homemakcr. 

Survivors include her husband, 
Richard; one daughter, Angela M. 
Hensley of Indianapolis, Ind. and one 
son, Llge (Annemarle) Hensley of Mt, 
Washington, Ky.; her mother, Helen 
White of Antloch and one sister, Paula 
(Edward) Hain of Spring Grove. She 
was the grandmother of Abigail, 
Prlscllla Hart and her father Roosevelt 
Daniels preceded her in death. 

Funerol Services were in 
Mlddletown, Ind. with burial in 
Machanlcsburg Cemetery, 

Machanlcsburg, Ind. 

In lieu of flowers donations may 
be made to her family. 

Local arrangements were entrust- 
ed to the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. 

Lydia D. Berlin 

Age 88, of Wauconda, died Dec. 
23, 1998 at Crystal Lake. She was born 
Jan. 1, 1910 in Russia. She was a long- 
time member of St. Matthew Lutheran 
Church, Lake Zurich. Lydia was a . 
longtime resident of Lake Zurich area 
and ran a dairy farm with her husband 
for many years. She Is preceded In 
death by her husband. 

Funeral services were held at St. 
Matthew Lutheran Church, Lake 
Zurich. 

Interment was private. 

Arrangements were entrusted to 
Ahlgrim and. Sons Funeral Home of 
Lake Zurich. 

Memorials may be made to St. 
Matthew Lutheran Church, 24500 N. 
" Old McHenry Road., Lake Zurich, IL 
60047. " 

Kathy Rynish-Ascher 

Age 67 of Round Lake passed 



away on Dec. 24, 1998. She was born 
on Oct, 9, 1931 in County Tyrone, 
Northern Ireland, and has been a resi- 
dent of Round Lake for 36 years, She. 
was also a member of St. Joseph 
Catholic Church of Round Lake. 

Kathy is survived by her daugh- 
ters, Karen (Daniel) Glay of Inglesldc, 
and Donna (Hugh) Brown of. 
Inglesldc; her grandchildren, 
Kathleen, Hugh, and No/een; her sis- 
ter, . Debbie (Brian) Shannon of 
Ontario, Canada; her brothers, 
Daniel (Georgle) Crampsie of 
Pinellas, Flo., James Crampsie of 
Northern Ireland, Thomas (Phyllis) 
Crampsie of Nova Scotia and Michael 
(Michelle) Crampsie of Ontario, 
Canada.. She is also survived by lov- 
ing In-laws and many nieces and 
nephews. She Is preceded in death by 
her husband, Donald Rynlsh; her 
husband, Bud Ascher; her Infant, son 
Donny; her sisters, Celine Boyd, 
Phyllis Daly and Leila McManus; and 
her parents, Daniel and Brlgld 
Crampsie. 

- Mass of the Resurrection was cel- 
ebrated at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 
Round Lake. 

Interment was at Ascension 
Cemetery in Libertyville, 

Friends and family visited at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

William F. Reames Sr. 

Age 80 of Twin Lakes, Wis., for- 
merly of Park City, went home to the 
Lord, Friday, Dec. 25, 1998. He was ■ 
born in Herrin, Dec. 31, 1917, son of' 
the late Thomas and Lula Reames. He 
was a veteran of WWII serving with 
U.S. Army in the Pacific Theatre of 
Operation. He moved to Waukegan in 
1946 and was employed with Johns- 
Manville Corp. Waukegan plant from 
1946 to 1980. 



He is survived by two children, his 
son, William F. Reames, Jr., Morrison, 
and his daughter, Renee Winscom, 
Pell Lake, Wis.; six grandchildren and 
two great grandchildren. He Is also 
survived by his step mother Mary Nell 
Reames, Whitehall; four sisters, Jessie 
(Harold) Pearce, Herrin, Margaret (the 
late William) Land, Herrin, Delores 
(Darrell) Ford, Hlllvlew and Debbie 
(Gordon) Parrish, Fairbanks, Alaska 
and three brothers, John (Mary) of 
Vandalia, Bob (Minnie) Herrin and 
Ted Reames, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Friends of the family visited at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake and 
then was transferred to Johnson and 
Hughs Funeral Home, Herrin, where 
Funeral Services were held. 

Interment was at Herrin City 
Cemetery, Herrin. 

Joanne Ebel Coy 

Age 54 of Antloch, passed aWay 
Dec. 24, 1998 at St. Therese Hospital 
In Waukegan. She was born March 1 1 , 
1944 in Elgin. She was employed by 
the Lake Forest School District where 
she was a secretary. She was formerly 
employed as a bookkepper by the 
Marriott Corp. Joanne was an avid col- 
lector of Santa Clauses. 

She is survived by her husband, 
Robert Coy; sons Steven Coy of 
Antioch, Robert Karreman of LaPorte, 
Ind.; step daughter, Dianna (Jeff) 
Slmeral of Lisle; brothers, Lorln Ebel 
of Covina, Calif, Joseph (Linda) Ebel* 
of Crystal Lake; sisters, Dawn 
(Leonard) LeDuc of Algonquin, 
Lavonne (Fredrick) Black of St. 
Charles; grandchildren, Jacob 
Slmeral, Joanne Karreman, 

• A memorial gathering was held at 
Wait Ross Allanson Funeral Chapel, 
Algonquin. 

Interment was private. 







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LIPSERVICE 



C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



January 1, 1999 



Get it off your chest (847)223-8073 

Fax (847) 223-8810 e-mail: lipservice@lpnews.com 

Upservfce Is a phone-in column presented as a feature of Lakeland newspapers, lake- 
land newspapers makes no claim to the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland news- 
papers does not claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland newspapers reserves the right to edit copy or to refrain 
from printing a message. Call In at 223-8073, fax In at 223-8810, or e-mail at llpser- 
ylce@lpnaws.com and leave your message 24-hours a day. Callers must leave their 
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however, callers maybe called for verification. 



Polluters 

You may think that the crackle of 
the fireplace is a really neat thing, 
but if you did some research, you 
would find out, its realty a pollu- 
tant and it dirties the atmosphere 
with carbon dioxide which is one 
of the reasons why the earth is 
warming. Old people and young 
people surfer from the lack of air, 
because of the fire, smoke re- 
places the oxygen in the air. So be 
more thoughtful of your neigh- 
bors and others and just bum 
your fireplace once in awhile as a 
treat. Don't burn to heat your 
house, because it's just a waste 
and you're polluting. 

Libertyville 

Unopened 

This is a comment about the front 
page story of Wadsworth News, 
Dec. 18. While it's true that the 
States Attorney's office discussed 
violations of Open Meetings Act 
with the village board and decid- 
ed to educate on the matters of 
the meeting of the Act. It is not 
one trustee that had a political 
agenda or a personal one. These 
violations occurred over the past 
eight years or more and were first 
brought to the attention of the 
board by a member of the public. 
When they did nothing to im- 
prove, this person asked the States 
Attorney's office for assistance. 
Members of the board were asked 
about the minutes of an executive 
session and if they have ever 
heard of the Open Meetings Act. 
When some professed they had- 
n't, copies of the pertinent pages 
were passed out to them to study. 
This did not improve things, until 
the States Attorney gave the mat- 
ters some attention. Even if it were 
a matter of political agenda, as Mr. 
Kraft is quoted as saying, ignoring 
the law and wrong doing, still 
should be corrected. 

Wadsworth 

Senior servers 

Calling about the senior service, I 
think the township and the two 
villages that sponsor it, should re- 
alize what their responsibilities 



are when they sponsor something 
like this. The seniors could not go 
to any place, only where the di- 
rector wants to go. They cannot go 
out to eat, only to restaurants that 
the director says to go. Not only 
that, I think that the drivers, every 
year should have a physical and a 
drug test. I understand that the di- 
rector hasn't had a physical in 
eight years and not a drug test. 
Thank you. 

WaucondaJIsland Lake 

Keep pursuing 

I'm calling about Bill options." 
I'm the one that started the com- 
ments with ComEd with not get- 
ting a bill since July. I got another 
bill and it was $100 on Christmas 
Eve. They insist they get paid at 
once. I guess it was a glitch with 
the computer. Call ComEd like I 
did and say they can't afford it. 
They'll work out a payment op- 
tion. A supervisor called me and 
he said they would work out a dif- 
ferent payment schedule for me. 
Eventually, they'll work with you 
and won't turn off your power. 
This has happened to many peo- 
ple in Lake County. 

Lake Villa 

Thanks for report 

I want to thank the person who 
called police and got the license 
number of the person who hit my 
mom's car in the Eagle parking 
lot. She took off real quick and 
when police stopped her, she said 
she didn't realize she hit the car. 
That's funny because the car was 
pushed totally out of its parking 
spot. A big thank you to the per- 
son who reported her. We need 
more people like you so these id- 
iots don't get away with these 
things. 

' Round Lake Beach 

Should have resigned 

This is in response to TJlack ket- 
tles" and "Republican purge." I 
would put the odds on their chil- 
dren. They could've run the coun- 
try the past six years, with what 
the Republicans have done to set 
up the world economy and the 
cold war. Do I believe the polls in 



DllHii *-ft\irt£#.'H;*W(iii*Jf 



LAST WEEK'S QUESTION WAS: 

Do you believe the national Spoils on Impeachment? 

THIS WEEK'S QUEST16N IS: 

Can the Packers again mate It io the Super Bowl? 

'• ■ • ' ' - • ' ■ - ' '• • : " ' "'' -'■ - ' - 



L— 



v> .i,; v -. 



impeachment? I believe the pub- 
lic when they say they don't want 
Clinton to be impeached, I think 
the people would rather lie to get 
something for free In their pocket 
as Democrats, instead of working 
hard and honestly. Clinton should 
have resigned and saved us $40 
million. 

Gurnee 

Sick of other towns 

I live in Lake Zurich and our may- 
or was complaining at a board 
meeting that the grass in our park 
looks terrible. People living 
around the park don't complain 
about the grass, they complain' 
about the noise going on all sum- 
mer. There's people from other 
towns using our parks, too. I think 
maybe you should charge the 
non-residents to use our park. The 
taxpayers are sick of supporting' 
the communities around them. 
They walk away and leave us with 
all the fees and costs to keep these 
parks up. It's not fair. 

Lake Zurich 

A forewarning 

As a taxpayer and registered voter 
of your community, you come to 
expect certain services that should 
be provided by the village. Be fore- 
warned, Round Lake Park, stray 
cats are your problem, not the vil- 
lage's. Per Mayor Bauer, the cost to 
transfer a stray cat to Animal Con- 
trol is too costly for the village and 
the responsibility of disposition re- 
lies firmly on the shoulders of the 
taxpayers. You know, the people 
who pay money each year to be 
provided with such services. Mayor 
Bauer, if there's a problem with the 
cat population in your village, don't 
throw it back on the people you 
represent and who voted you into 
office. 

Round Lake Park 

Don't believe it 

No, I don't believe the polls about 
the Clinton impeachment. I think 
the polls are skewed to reflect what 
they want to hear, or want the pub- 
lic to hear. The Republicans were 
right to go after Clinton because he 
is a lying, cheating draft-dodging 
perjurer who doesn't deserve to be 
president of this great country. If a 
man sinks so low as to prefer or 
need oral sex with a woman over 
his family and country, then we let 
him go! Don't forget, the American 



public is his boss! 



Libertyville 



Get over it 

In answer to last week's question 
about Impeachment, I do believe 
that the public does not want to 
have the president impeached. 
It's clear that the president, al- 
though he was wrong in what he 
did, Is being made an example of 
by the holier-than-thou Republi- 
cans who have been after him 
since Day 1. Yes, Clinton was 
wrong in what he did, but this is 
also a matter that I feel is between 
him and his wife and family, not 
the nation. I don't believe what he 
did is an impeachable offense. I 
don't think our forefathers who 
wrote the Constitution would ei- 
ther. Clinton hasn't done what 
any other president or, for that 
matter, men and women in the 
Congress and Senate, have done 
before. Look at the Kennedys! Yet 
they're perhaps the most popular 
political family ever. A lot of peo- 
ple say so what if Clinton had sex- 
ual relations with Monica Lewin- 
sky, that's not the big deal, but the 
perjury is. Do you know how hard 
perjury is to prove in court? It all 
comes down to semantics! So 
we're going to continue to waste 
money, our money, on this politi- 
cal farce? Do you know ho w many 
starving children in our country 
all this money could have fed? I 
say, let's move on with our lives, 
and for the country's sake, let 
Clinton serve his term and then 
he's gone for good. It makes you 
wonder, who are the Republicans 
going to seek out to hang next? 

Libertyville 

Ding dong, Wanny's gone 

Thank goodness the Bears organi- 
zation Fired Dave Wannstedt! He 
is one of the worst coaches I've 
had the displeasure to watch. His 
play calling and player personnel 
decisions were horrible. He'd call 
a draw play on third and 25! Give 
me a break! Now the question is, 
who do the Bears get now? The 
McCaskeys won't spend the mon- 
ey on the big guys like Joe Gibbs, 
Mike Holmgren and George 
Selfert. So how about Gary Bar- 
nett? Who would you like to see as 
coach? Did you ever notice that 
the Bears downfall began when 
they took the Honeybears away? 

Antioch 



Rude state? 

I was in the grocery store a few days 
ago and was behind a middle-aged 
man who had about two or three 
Items. The clerk said hello, ran the 
items through and gave the man 
his total, all In the most profession- 
al and polite a manner. This man 
took out his wallet, grabbed a cou- 
ple of bills, held his arm out and 
flipped the money onto the 'jcbn- 
veyer belt with a flick of his wrist, all 
without a word. The clerk had her 
hand held out to accept his money, 
but this man chose to be rude and 
do this. What was he trying to 
prove? That he was superior to the 
clerk? That he was too important to 
be courteous and hand the clerk 
the money? This just goes to show 
you how the world is changing. 
People used to be more courteous 
and polite. Maybe it's just this state, 
I'm not from here originally, but I 
have never seen or experienced 
more rude people in my life than 
the people here. That includes dri- 
ving habits, shopping habits, etc. I 
commented to the clerk when it 
was my turn how very rude he was 
and she said that it happens all the 
time, and she gets very discouraged 
by it How sad. 

Libertyville 

Pay attention 

Why is it that every time I go to a 
fast food place, they get my order 
wrong? I know that the people 
working there aren't rocket scien- 
tists, but at least they could.core 
enough to get the orders right. A 
lot of the workers there are 
teenagers, but you would think 
their parents would bring their 
kids up with a good work ethic, 
that no matter where you work, 
you do your best at it. That's how 
you get ahead in life. 

Grayslake 

Happy New Year 

This is a wish for everyone that 
you have a happy and healthy 
1999 and that your worst days are 
behind and your best days ahead. 
Please make a resolution to be 
kind and courteous to others; 
thoughtful, loving and caring to 
family members; and kind to ani- 
mals in the new year. Instead of 
complaining about a situation, 
let's all try to do something to 
change it. Peace to all! 

Libertyville 




COMPENSATION 




Douglas Rallo 



<_ii_ 



6i i South Milwaukee Avenue 

Libertyville, Illinois 60048 

tel 847-816-8780 

FAX 847-816-9001 




Concentrated in 

Auto Accidents 

Workers' Compensation 

Wrongful Death 

Medical Malpractice 

Product Injuries 

Slip and Fall 

Dog Bites 

All Serious Personal 
Injury Cases 



— The Chicago Tribune has reported that 
Doug Ratio's "pioneering legal theory" on 
valuing the lost enjoyment of life, "is credited 
with winning millions of dollars for people 
severely injured or for the survivors of those 
killed by the negligent conduct of others". 

—Newsweek Magazine has written that 
Rallo is "on the cutting edge of an idea 
taking hold across the country," and, that 
his concept is being used in court "to win 
large damage awards for accident victims". 

1 

Douglas Rallo 

Mr. Rallo has nearly 20 years experience in 
helping injured parties. He Is listed in 
Who's Who in American Law, and is a past 
chairman of the Medical/Legal Committee . 
of the Lake County Bar Association. 



LICENSED IN ILLINOIS AND WISCONSIN 



. ■> ■■ ■ ; i <■> 






in 




f Lakeland Newspapers CELEBRATE THE NEW YEAR January 1, 1999 



A • 




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A festive punch for 
holiday entertaining 



:#; 



Serve a delicious and easy-to- 
prepare wine punch this holi- 
day, Made with ' Mogen 
David's Blush Red Concord 
wine, this punch will add sparkle and 
color to any special occasion. 

Wine Punch 

» 

Makes 40 servings 

3 bottles Mogen David Blush 
Red Concord wine 

2 liters club soda 

2 liters ginger ale 

2 small packages frozen 
strawberries 



■-- 



' «o w Place ice mold in punch bowl 
a * • a • and pour in wine, soda and ginger 
»• JLale; add strawberries. 

Make a wonderful 
holiday punch with 
Mogen David Blush 
Red Concord wine. 






Tasty treat for unexpected guests 



The holidays are here, and it is a 
very busy time. Your days prob- 
ably are filled with holiday 
chores — shopping, cooking, 
gift wrapping. This is a time for cheer, 
good times and often, unexpected visits 
from friends. 

The next time visitors show up at 
your door unannounced, don't fret! 
Serve up a tasty dip that can be made 
with ingredients you already have on 
hand. Recipe is courtesy of "The Cali- 
fornia Artichoke Cookbook" 

Dip with zip! 

Makes I cup 

1/2 cup sour cream 



1/2 cup mayonnaise 

11/2 tablespoons chopped 

chives 

1 tablespoon prepared horser 

radish 

1/2 teaspoon salt i 

Combine all ingredients; mix 

well. 



»Af 



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$Mi£ 



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Downtown location since 1977 




Roger Lutz 



From our 

Family to yours, 

have a Happy 

Holiday Season. 



AMERICAN FAMILY 

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Fill out the entry form below and take it to one of 
the fine merchants listed for your chance to win. 
(Additional entry forms are mailable at each location.) 



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FOLLOWING 
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240 N. Cedar Lake Road • Round Lake 
Mon. & Thurs. 12-7, Tues. & Frl, 12-5, Sal. 1 1-3, Closed Wed. & Sun 




American Family Insurance 

Roger Lutz 

1 08 Center Street, Gray slake 

Mutual Cellular 

960 I Rollins Road, Round Lake 
3563 Grand Avenue, Gurnee 

PigglyWiggly 

8 1 5 Center Street, Grayslake 

Silk-N-Haz 

240 Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake 

Tailwinds 

Country Faire Plaza 
Routes 45 and 1 20, Grayslake 

Second Federal Savings 

Corner of Route 1 2 & Grand Avenue, Fox Lake 

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3 









January 1, 1999 



IT'S A WONDERFUL SALE 




Lakeland Newspapers/ E3 



A New Year's toast to fashion 



Be the most breathtaking sight in 
the room this New Year's Eve 
with an outfit that truly dazzles. 
With all the stress of the hol- 
idays behind you, New Year's is the 
night to break away from your ardu- 
ous routine and celebrate! Go ahead 
and treat yourself to that special out- 
fit you've been noticing from the cor- 
ner of your eye each time you passed 
that same shop window in pursuit of 
loved ones' gifts. 

Forget the budget — make that 
your New Year's resolution to work 
out later. This is the night of all nights 
to shine like Cinderella, to forget 
about making do with what's already' 
in your closet. Slip into that daring 
little number and prepare to dance 
the night away as the clock ticks to- 
ward the midnight countdown and a 
sparkling new year. With this season's 
sizzling styles in evening wear, you 
can leave your pumpkin coach and 
glass slippers at home — you won't 
need them. 

A stunning, shlmmery ensemble, 
as shown here, courtesy of Carolina ■ 
Herrera, adds just the right magic to 
attract all eyes in the room and cap- 
ture any prince's heart. With a shim- 
mering fitted knee-length skirt that 
flatters the legs, you'll sparkle like a 
flute glass brimming with cham- 
pagne. A glittering camisole reveals 
' an alluring span of neckline that's vi- 
sually arresting. 

And don't forget about the shoesl. 
A pair of s trappy matching sandals 
are sure to stay on tight while flatter- 
ing your dancing feet. Pull It all to- 
gether with a dazzling jacket to match 
the skirt, and keep warm throughout 
the chilly winter night without sacri- . 
ficing a drop of glamour. 

The new year is coming up as fast 
as the champagne is being poured, so 
don't wait — let your shimmering 
beauty rise to the surface. 



Mark the 'Millennium' 



I 





From advance bookings at the 
world's most elegant hotels and 
restaurants to the twin millenni- 
um countdown screens in Times 
Square, the wheels are in motion for an 
unprecedented global gala. To offer revel- 
ers a unique way to usher In the new era, 
Domecq Importers introduces Courvoisi- 
er Millennium, a specially blended co- 
gnac that has been created to mark the 
arrival of the year 2000. , . 

; Carefully crafted with a unique blend 
of cognacs from the Grande and Petite 
champagne and mature Borderies, Cour- 
voisier Millennium has been aged 6 to 12 
years. This careful selection of several ex- 
ceptional vintages matured to their peak, 
results in a remarkably smooth quality 
that is accentuated with aromas of prune, 
gingerbread and fruitcake. The cognac is 
an exquisite gift Item that js sure to ap-.~ 
peal to anyone during the holidays and 
other festive occasions, says the compa- 
ny.. 

Cognac has long been associated with 
celebration, reward and special events, 
but an increasing number of discovery- 
minded consumers are responding to a 
more casual and versatile image of co- 
gnac. The smooth drinkability, versatility 
and premium quality of Courvoisier Mil- 
lennium invites people to celebrate with 
cognac, just as they would with cham- 
pagne. 

The following makes a wonderful 
cocktail to help usher in the millennium. 

Millennium French Kiss 

1 ounce Courvoisier Millennium 



French champagne 
Sugar cube 



Place sugar cube in bottom of flute; pour 

over layer of Courvoisier Millennium, and 

fill glass with fine champagne. 

For more information and recipes/visit 

http://www.courvolsier.com. 




Designed to appeal to anyone with a 
particular passion for celebrations, 
Courvoisier Millennium is a special 
blend cognac that has been created es- 
pecially to mark the arrival of the year, 
2000 and other celebratory occasions. 




■ . 








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E4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CELEBRATE THE NEW YEAR 



January 1, 1999 



Appetizers for ringing in the New Year 



Cherry tomatoes stuffed 
with Wisconsin 
herbed cheese 

by Ana Larramendi, Executive 

Chef 

Coyote Capers Elegant Edibles, 

Inc. 

Madison, Wisconsin 

1 tablespoon fresh parsley or 
dill sprigs, for garnish 

3 dozen attractive cherry 
tomatoes, ideally 1 to 1-1/2 inch- 
es in diameter 

2 tablespoons prepared basil 
pesto (or 3 tablespoons chopped 
fresh basil leaves) . 

1 teaspoon fresh minced gar- 
lic 

2 tablespoons chopped fresh 
parsley 

2 tablespoons snipped fresh 
chives 
# # 1 tablespoon 

fresh 
chopped 
tarragon 
^ or dill 
10 
ounces 
Wiscon- 
sin 

cream 
cheese 
Set 
aside at- 
tractive 




sprigs of parsley or dill for gar- 
nish. 

With a very sharp paring 
knife, cut off the top 1 /3 of each 
cherry tomato on the stem side. 
Delicately cut out the inside of 
each cherry tomato, hollow out 
all the cherry tomatoes and set 
aside. 

In a food processor, place all 
the pesto and garlic and herbs 
(except the sprigs for garnish) 
and process 15 seconds. Add the 
cream cheese and process anoth- 
er 30-45 seconds or until the fill- 
ing is free of lumps. 

Place the filling in a pastry 
bag fitted with a star tip and pipe 
into each cherry tomato. Garnish 
the tops with a fresh herb sprig. 
Refrigerate until ready to serve. 

Makes 3 dozen. 

Golden beet salad with 
Wisconsin blue cheese 
and hickory nuts 

by Ana Larramendi, Executive Chef 
Coyote Capers Elegant Edibles, Inc. 
Madison, Wisconsin 

Salad: 

2 pounds golden beets (or red 
beets), simmered in water until ten- 
der 

4 green onions, thinly sliced 
2 tablespoons fresh dill, chopped 
3/4 cups Wisconsin Blue 
j»A£e. cheese, crumbled 
*7tC 1/2 cup hickory nuts, 

toasted in the oven (pecans 
can be substituted) 

Dressing: 

1-1/2 table- 
spoons lemon 
juice 



3 tablespoons cider vinegar 
2 tablespoons honey 

1/2 teaspoon black pepper 

4 tablespoons canola oil 
1/4 teaspoon salt 

Peel cooked beets, chill and cut 
into slices or batons. Whisk togeth- 
er all the ingredients for the dress- 
ing. Mix the dressing with the beet 
mixture. 

Combine with green onions, dill 
and half of the blue cheese. Arrange 
the salad in a decorative bowl or 
platter and sprinkle the top with the 
remaining blue cheese and toasted 
hickory nuts. 
Makes 6 servings. 

Wisconsin gouda 
cheese, summer corn 
chowder with sundried 
tomatoes 

by Chef Robert Hughes 
Restaurant Magnus 
Madison, Wisconsin 

8 ears of com 

2 large onions, diced 

1 head of celery, diced 

1 red pepper, diced 

2 leeks, diced 

3 large potatoes 

1 cup diced sundried tomatoes 
1/2 cup olive oil 
1 head of garlic, pealed and 
minced 

3 tablespoons finely chopped 
fresh thyme salt and pepper 

4 cups heavy cream 
Tabasco sauce 

1-1/2 tablespoons cornstarch 
dissolved in 1/3 cup milk 

1/4 cup butter 

6 ounces grated Wisconsin Gou- 
da cheese 

Clean corn and remove from 



the ear. Chop vegetables and pota- 
toes. In a large heavy- bottom pot, 
add olive oil, all the vegetables (ex- 
cept the potatoes) and sundried 
tomatoes. Heat on high until golden 
brown. 

Add potatoes, garlic, thyme, salt 
and pepper. Stir in heavy cream 
and bring to a boil. Simmer (do not 
boil) over low heat 15-20 minutes. 
Add cornstarch mixture slowly; stir 
until thickened. Add Tabasco sauce 
to taste. Stir in the butter and grated 
Wisconsin Gouda cheese. 
Makes 6 servings. 

Wisconsin Asiago bread 
sticks 

by Chef Paul Short 
The Sandhill Inn 
Merrimac, Wisconsin 

2-1/4 pounds bread flour (about , 
7-1/4 cups) 

2 tablespoons active dry yeast 

2-1/2 cups water 

1 tablespoon Kosher salt 

1 tablespoon sugar 

1 cup olive oil 

1/2 cup chopped parsley 

2 cups grated Wisconsin Asiago . 
cheese 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. 

Combine flour and salt in a 
large bowl and set aside In^an- 
other large bowl, pour in water 
heated to 90 degrees F. Pour sug- 
ar into the water. Sprinkle yeast 
on top of the water and let sit 
until'yeast has activated and is 
foamy. Combine flour mixture 
with water mixture and knead 
seven minutes or until the dough 
springs back when pushed down. 

Form kneaded dough 







into a ball. Rub the dough with 
some of the olive oil.. Rub the 
sides of the bowl with olive oil. 
Cover bowl with plastic wrap and 
set in a warm area of the kitchen. 

Let dough proof until double ' 
in size. . 

Mix chopped parsley with 
Asiago cheese. When dough has 
doubled in size, roll it out onto 
table. Divide dough Into ap- 
proximately 50 pieces. Roll 
breadsticks in the palm of your 
hand. 

After rolling each stick, 
brush with olive oil and roll in 
cheese mixture. Place on lightly 
oiled baking pan and bake in 
preheated 350 degree F oven 
until golden brown, 12 to 15 
minutes. Brush with olive oil 
and serve. 

Makes approximately 50 bread 
sticks. 

Sungold tomato salad 
with cilantro vinaigrette 

Please see APPETIZERS /E5 ' 








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LENDER $1 00 to open a checking account. 1, Special fees such as overdraft charge's may apply. 2, With our ATM card only. Foreign proprietary fees may apply. $250 to open a savings account. New accounts only. 

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January 1, 1999 



IT'S A WONDERFUL SALE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ E5 



and queso para freir 

by Chef Brian Boehm 
Deb & Lola's Restaurant 
Madison, Wisconsin 

Dressing 

1-1/4 cups chopped cilantro 

3 cloves garlic, peeled and 
chopped 

1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon chopped 
white onion 

1/4 cup cider vinegar 

1/4 cup water 

1 teaspoon salt 

1 teaspoon sugar 

3/4 cup vegetable oil 

Place all ingredients, except oil, 
in blender container and liquify. 
Slowly pour in oil and mix for 30 to 
45 seconds. 

Salad 

1 cup vegetable oil 



"' ! -'"-' •■ ! 



4 6-inch flat corn tortillas, cut 
into 1/2-inch strips 

3 tablespoons vegetable oil 
1 cup cubed Queso Para Frier or 
Wisconsin white cheese curds 

5 cups mixed baby greens 

10 - 12 ounces Sungold cherry 
tomatoes, halved 

1 /3 cup thinly sliced sweet red 
onions 

Heat 1 cup oil in heavy fry 
pan on medium to medium-high 
heat. Fry corn tortilla strips 
about 1-1/2 to 2 minutes and 
drain on paper toweling. Set 
aside. Heat 3 tablespoons oil in a 
heavy saute pan until oil'just be- 
gins to smoke. Swirl oil in pan 
arid add cubed cheese. Saute" 
cheese until lightly browned. 

Remove from pan and drain , 
on paper towels. Mix greens with 
3 to 4 tablespoons of vinaigrette 
and distribute evenly on 4 



plates. Scatter tomatoes and 
sliced onions over greens. Place 
cheese arouncTfeach salad and 
drizzle 1 - 2 tablespoons vinai- 
grette over each salad. Top each 
salad with small amount of . 
crispy tortilla strips. 

Serves 4 
Copyright 1997, Dairy Council of 
Wisconsin. All rights reserved. 

Cheesy crab dip 

Karen Kuester 

2 cans crabmeat, rinsed and 
drained thoroughly 

2 jars Kraft Old English cheddar 
cheese 

1 8 oz, package cream cheese 

Melt cream cheese and Old Eng- 
lish together over low heat until 
smooth, stirring constantly. Add 
( crabmeat and mix well. Serve with 
assorted crackers or crispy French 
bread. (This dip fares well in a chaf- 



ing dish). 

Glazed chicken wings 

Ruth Bauer 

3 lbs. chicken wings 

1/2 cup butter, melted 

1 tsp, salt 

1/2 tsp. pepper 

1/2 cup orange juice 

1/2 cup sherry 

1/2 cup soy sauce 

1/4 cup granulated sugar 

1 tsp. ginger 

1/8 tsp. garlic powder 

Cut off tips of wings and dis- 



card. Cut wings in half. Spread 
cup pieces in shallow baking pan. 
Add salt and pepper to butter and 
pour over chicken pieces. Bake in 
325 degree oven for 30 minutes. 
Combine orange juice, sherry, soy 
sauce, ginger and garlic powder 
in small saucepan. Bring to boil. 
Baste chicken wings with soy 
sauce mixture. Continue baking 1 
hour at 325 degrees. Baste often 
with sauce mixture. Drain on rack 
for a few minutes before serving. 
Makes 40 pieces. 



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over the holidays, 

visit us in the 

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Make a resolution to visit the Gurnee Antique 

Center Browse our 24,000 square feet of 

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Take Dille/s Road South off 
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- | jf . * | f « * 



.. E6 I Lakeland Newspapers 



CELEBRATE THE NEW YEAR 



January 1, 1999 



Stocking the 
unexpected 



pantry for 
oliday visitors 




So, you've just finished a long day at 
work and you're ready for some seri- 
ous relaxation. You toss the mail onto 
the coffee table, unopened, sink down 
onto the couch and kick off your shoes. That's 
when it hits you — the holiday season is here 
again and you haven't done a tiling to pre- 
pare! You've got festive feasts to plan, lists to 
make, cards to write, gifts to buy, halls to 
deck. But how will you find the time? Your 
panic is interrupted by the sound of the door- 
bell announcing another inevitable holiday 
season reality: unexpected guests. As much as 
you'd love to be a gracious host, all you can 
find in the kitchen to offer your guests is a can 
of stale peanuts and half a carton of milk . 
that's passed the expiration date. 
It doesn't have to be that way. 
With a little advance planning, you can be 
ready for anything Cor anyone) this holiday 
season. Simply adding a few key items to your 
regular grocery list during that crucial period 
between Thanksgiving and New Year's can 
help make last-minute entertaining a plea- 
sure instead of a pain. Here are a few items no 
holiday kitchen should be without; 

• Gourmet cheeses — A cheese board is a 
quick and easy option for entertaining holiday 
guests. Simply arrange a few wedges of cheese 
on a cutting board or dinner plate, surround- 



ed by crackers or slices of French bread. If 
your guest traffic is fairly light, choose vari- 
eties that will stay fresh in the refrigerator for 
a week or two. Firm, aged cheeses, like Gouda, 
Swiss and Cheddar, will last up to three 
weeks. Softer cheeses, like Brie and Gor- 
gonzola, should be eaten within a week of 
purchase. 

• Fresh bread — Forget about kneading 
the dough yourself; just pick up a fresh loaf of 
crusty French bread from the corner bakery 
or grocery store. Baguette slices are perfect 
with holiday spreads and cheeses. Don't wor- 
ry about the bread going stale; if guests don't 
come calling, you can always serve it with din- 
ner. 

•Assortment of crackers — When there's 
no fresh bread in sight, crackers make excel- 
lent partners for impromptu cheese trays and 
dips. Even after the package has been opened, 
crackers will stay fresh for weeks in an airtight 
container or zippered plastic bag. Some ele- ■ 
gant choices include Can's Croissant Crack- 
ers and Jacob's Cream Crackers. 

• Champagne or sparkling wine— Noth- 
ing makes your guests feel truly welcome like 
a shimmering glass of bubbly, so keep a 
chilled bottle in the refrigerator throughout 
the holiday season. That way, when visitors 
pop in, you'll be ready to pop the cork! For a 



Dr. Romeo Dacanay 

welcomes 



■ 



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Specializing in Internal & Geriatric Medicine 



• Orcr 20 yan of caring tipetkncc with another location hi libcnyviDc 

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Mcdkarc.arignmentaceepted • (847)4874573 (847) 367-1755 

WEBSITE: wwwUtchualoe.com 






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I Buy 5 Get 1 FRl 
Buy10Get2F| 
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REMEMBER 

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BEFORE YOU 

GO ON THAT 

WINTER 






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Fill-Ins 



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pxmities a 3tap#jy, Meia ty&cvd 



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Tropical Tan/Nail Spa 

34825 Wilson Road 

Rte 134 & Wilson 

Ingleside 

546-8600 



■■■ /l ii 



special treat, pick up a bottle of Louis Roeder- 
er Brut Premier. If French champagne Isn't in 
your budget, California sparkling wines offer a 
delicious and affordable alternative. Roederer 
Estate L'Ermltage Is one of the critics' fa- 
vorites — and it costs less than many of its 
French cousins. 

• Cookies for grown-ups — Cookies are no 
longer the exclusive domain of children and 
blue furry monsters. Delicate, sophisticated 
cookies line the grocery store shelves, so be 
sure to bring home a couple varieties during 
the holiday season. For a sweet treat, try Pep- 
peridge Farm Milanos or Carr's Butter Cook- 
fe's Topped With Milk Chocolate. 

• Coffee, tea and hot chocolate — For 
those cold winter days, offer last-minute 
guests a steaming cup of freshly brewed cof- 
fee or tea. Try something special for the holi- 
days, like hazelnut-flavored coffee or cinna- 
mon tea. Hot chocolate also is a welcome 
cold-weather treat. 

Having just two of these holiday kitchen 
essentials on hand will allow you to whip up 
this recipe from Gourmet magazine at the 
drop of a hat or the ring of a doorbell. It's deli- 
cious, elegant and as simple to make as toast 

Goat Cheese Toasts 

Makes 12 toasts 

21/2-inch-thick diagonally cut slices 
of Italian or French bread 
Olive oil for brushing the toasts 
l/4pound soft mild goat cheese 
On a baking sheet, broil the bread slices 
under a preheated broiler about 3 inches from 
the heat for one to two minutes on each side, 
or until they are golden. Brush one side of 
each toast lightly with the oil. Spread the oiled 
sides evenly with the goat cheese, covering 
them completely, and sprinkle the cheese 
with pepper to taste. Return the goat cheese 
toasts to the broiler and broil them for one 
minute, or until the cheese is slightly melted 



and glistening. Serve the toasts warm or at 
room temperature. 

Serve with champagne or sparkling wine. 
With a little advance preparation and some ' 
well-chosen kitchen essentials, you will be 
able to greet your drop-in visitors with ' 
warmth and graciousness. 




In case of holiday guest emergency: 
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January 1, 1999 CELEBRATE THE NEW YEAR Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 






1 

1 
1 

1 
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E8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CELEBRATE THE NEW YEAR 



January 1> 1999 



Pick Up & Go Cellular ; 
Now That's A Cool Gift. 



• No Contracts 

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: fj|pi) MOTOROLA 550 FLU 
FIRST 3fi MINUTES OF LOCAL 



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w^ajajaawat 






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The easiest, most convenient 
way to get cellular phone service. 



5^ PICK UP $ GO 



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:-.■-■-:■ - ■■•-: 




January 1, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C9 





la$%ified *mfuide 

Notices ." '.". ..... .... . . ..... . .1 10 

Lost & Found 115 

Free 120 

Personals "....;... 1 25 

Auctions ..." i . "• . .• 130 

Business Personals . .'.* .135 

Finunciul .HO 




Help Wanted Part-Time 
Help Wanted Full-Time 
Employment Agencies 
Business Opportunities 
Situations Wanted 

Child Care 

School/Instruction- 



.219 

.220 

.221 

.225, 

.228 

.240 

.250 



Antiques - 301 

Appliances • . • . ' 304 

Darter/Trade .308 

Buzuurs/CrufB ;. rv '•■'. .310 

Building Materials . . 314 

Business/Office Equipment 318 

Electronics/Computers .320 

Fund Guide • ■ • -324 

Firewood •' 328 

Gurjgc/Ruinnuige Sales "...•.,.,. .330 

Good Tilings To Eat 334 

Horses &Tuck 338 

Household Coods/Funiiture '........ a . .340 

Jewelry . '. 344 

Lawn/Garden , • . -348 

Clothing . . ' " 349 

Miscellaneous ,. ........' . .350 

Medical Equip/Supplies " : 354 

- Musical Instruments . . . .358 

Pets & Supplies ■ • 360 

Restaurant Equipment • . .364 

Tools' & Machinery 368 

Wanted To Buy : 370 







Homes For Sale ..." ■ -500 

Homes For Rent .. ... .504 

Homes Wanted ....'. 508 

Homes Builders s .510 

(.'undo/ Town Homes .514 

Mobile Homes .5 1 8 

Apartments For Rent ,'.... - 520 

Apartments Wanted 524 

Apt/Homes To Share ..528 

Rooms For Rent 530 

Buildings ...'..' • 533 

Business Property For Sale • .-..• .'-534 

Business Property For Rent 538 

Investment Properly 540 

Moriguge Service.* . .' .544 

Farms 548 

Vacant Lots/Acreage . 560 

Resorts/Va cation Rentals ...................... .564 

Out Of Area Properly "...'....• . -568 

Cemetery Lois ......' .570 

Real Estate Wunlcd ■.<•.. 574 

Real Estate Misc. ■■':.:.'. '. ..... . . .578 

„ .. . . r .,., ,. . ; .- v . . . 






Recreational Vehicles .704 

Snowmobtles/ATVs . .708 

Boats/Moiors/Etc 710 

Camping 714 

Travel/Vacation -. 718 

Sports Equipment .720 

Airplanes , .724 

L-tfiUliffOfttlliO* 

. Cars For Sale 804 

Rental/Leases .808 

Classic/Antique Curs . . . . , . .810 

Services &. Paris 814 

Car Loans/Insurance 818 

Vans : 824 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps .828 

• Trucks/Trailers . . . 834 

Heavy Rquipmcnt .838 

Motorcycles -.., ........... .844 

Wauled To Buy . : .'. . .848 

""."*!■: rr*r«;:-'7yt«B!Ta»qr]BaiiM|M-ir^'.-.- J >rv.''r «•;;; 






rrvlce 0*mtircctaru . 

Appliances Repair .S03 

Blacktop '. S06 

Builders S09 

Curpeiiiry S|2 

Carpel Cleaning , ,SI5 

Concreie/Cemeut .SI 8 

Dry Wall . , , S2I 

Educalion/lnslruction . . .-. '. .S24 

Electrical : .S27 

Firewood .S30 

Handyman S33 

Heating/Air Conditioning ,' .'. .S36 

Housekeeping *. .S39 

Landscaping '.-...■ S42 

Luuiidry/Cleaniiig S45 

Legal Services ; S48 

Medical Services S5I 

Moving/Storage S54 

Painting Decorating .S57 

Paralegal/Typing Services .SGO 

Plumbing S63 

Pools S66 

Pressure Washing .'.S69, 

Professional Services .S72 

Rudio/rV Repair S75 

Remodeling ,'•>'•-'.- • **'" 

Resumes ■ S8 1 

Roolliig/Sidhig S84 

Storage ...... i S87 

Tax Service S90 

Trees/Plauu S93 

Wedding ..,...., .,...'..'. .S96 

Miscellaneous S99 



£> 



istriiution 

Kenosha 
County 




Johns burg 



McHonry , 



CryiU! 

Uke 

McIIcnry 
County 






lilindLaks Mundeleln' 

Wauconds 



Millborn 

£^ YYadsworth 

Gumss 

WauVegin 



North 
^ChtoiBo 

Oskt" 



North 
Binlnolo'n uka Zurich' 

KlldMf 



1 /^S 



Vornon ubirtyvllla .... 
Hi,i * LjJwFofett \' 



Dtrrlngton. 



'Long 
;.Q(ov«' 



Dcertield 



nswisr" 

Cook County 



Buffalo Grove 





' Highland Park 



Norlhbrook 



Lakeland Newspapers' Classifieds Appear in 11 Newspapers! 

Antioch News • Roiuid Xalce News • Lalce Villa Record 

Miindelein News • Wadswortli News • Grayslalce Tlnxes 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnee : Press • Lindenluirst News 

Waucorida Leader • Libertyville News 



HOW TO PLACE A 
CLASSIFIED AD 



BY . CALL 

PHONE (847)223-8161 

R Y Lakeland Newspapers 
*7a.. P.O. Box 268 

MAIL Qrayslake, IL 60030 



IN 30 S. Whitney St. 

PERSON Grayslake 

ritfi 



BY 
FAX (847)223-2691 






Direct Line Tues. 5pm 

Business & Private Party...Wed. 10am 



8am-8pm..... Mon.-Thurs. 

I 8am-5pm. .' ..Friday, 




m$$i 





Newspapers 



no 



Notices 



120 


Free 



140 



Financial 



219 



Kelp Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



■ 



Kelp Wanted 
Part-Time 



ERRORS: 

• We strive to eliminate 
eriors, but if one should ' 
occur, please report it' 
\ Immediately as we can be 
responsible for the first two 
(2) weeks only. 

NO AOJUSTWENTSCAN 

BE MADE UNLESS THEY 
AFFECT THE MATERIAL 
VALUE OF AN AD* 



HYPNOTHERAPY 

The Holistic Approach to 

Good Health. 

Stop Smoking 

Lose Weight and More. 

FREE CONSULTATION. 

(847) 616^>851. 

ROUND LAKE PARK 

AMERICAN LEGION 

NEW YEARS EVE PARTY 

BEGINNING AT 7:00 

LIVE BAND 

COYOTE MOON 

*FREE DRAFT BEER 

•RAFFLES . 

•FOOD 

S30.0O-COUPLE 

$15.00 SINGLE. 



WRITE FOR YOUI 

•X-Maa Cards 

•Wedding Invitations 

•Shower/Party Invitations. 

•Handwritten. 

* Reasonable rates. 

Call (815) 363-5330. 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS . IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more Information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. - 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
1N077 GET -.niO-VOF-VTHE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 

Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are. run at NO 
CHARGEI (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines; 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161, ext140. 



M AXED OUT? 

Buried In Debt? 

Behind on your payments? 

Living paycheck to paycheck? 

You're not alone. 

But the good nevra Is, 

we have a REAL solution 

Oebt Crisis Solutions. 

Confidential. 

Call Today (847) 740-9178. 

Ext. #3. 

S5SSSSSSSSSSS5SS 



125 



Personals 



HEAL THY W OMEN 

$3500.00 Compensation 

Healthy women, age 20-33, 

needed to serve us unonymous 

egg donors. Donors will be 

required to take medication. 

blood screening und undergo 

minor surgical procedure. We 

arc interested in nil ethnic 

backgrounds. Multiple locatiolis 

available. If interested call 

ARR 773-327-7315 
■ Scriims Inquiries Only 



115 



Lost & Found 



TTPAYS- 
TO LOSE WEIGHT1 

LOOK GOOD, FEEL GREAT! 

EARN EXTRA INCOME WITH 

HERBAUFEI 

TOLL FREE 

(877) 500-SUM. 

LOOK GREATI 
LOSE WEIGHT! 
MAKE MONEY! 
(847) 940-9689. 

LOSE WEIGHT 

LOOK & FEEL 

GREAT 

EARN EXTRA INCOME 

AND DISCOUNTS 

ON PRODUCTS. 

HERBAUFE 

Call Kathy...(847) 395-8053 

LOSE UP TO 29 LBS. 

In 30 Days. 

Dr. Recommended. 

100% Natural. 

(815) 455-7339. 

1-888-373-7527. 

WE PAY YOU TO LOSE 

WEIGHT! 

METABOUFE356TM 

Natural diet supplement. 

Lose weight & Fell Great. 

. As advert is led on US 99... 

Independent distributor 

(847)263-3876 

http:\\cyber- 

mall2000.com\stores\ 
, metabolite 



INSTANT 
CASH 

We hold the me 

loyowcar- 

You keep the car. 

(Jet skis, 

motorcycles & 
snowmobiles too!!) 

' No Credit Check 

* 15 Mm Approval 



Administrative 
Assistant 

Work 20 hrs per week. 
Phone St Computer 

skills needed. 

Call: 

Home Cleaning 
(847) 970-5380 



g 

Wis. 



matos. 



Office Cleaner | 

at night 

$8 per hour 

Couples a plus] 

UbertyviUe 

area 

(815)344-01201 



P amper ed Chef 

needs more consultants 
to demonstrate quality' 
Kitchen tools at home 
kitchen shows. Average 
$15/$20 hour commis- 
sion. No experience 
necessary. Call Linda 
(847) 249-1015 



W 



| (847) 249-5500 1 

ssssssssssssssss 



219 



. _n 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



] 



GRAPHIC DESIGN 

looking for a fasi; creative 

expertenced designer 

to work at our Grayslake 

office. Experience preferred 

onlBMComp,Cbrd 

Draw 4/ot lUustratDT. 

Individual must be reliable, 

sdf starter. Independent 

thinker, upbeat attltikle, 

responsible k aHe 

to meet deadlines. 

Possible F/T employment 

jj ■■ available. 

C'-i Please call Aruuflyn at f\ J 

%_ (847) 22^/699^ 



TELEMARKETING 



PART-TIME 

Upto$IO/Hour 
Plus Commissions. 
Flexible Schedule. 

Call Tom 
847-918-0707 



8* 



efi 



b your p«t a star? 

Send us a picture and maybe j 

your pet will be Uie nejct 
PKT OF THI WCEKl 

SmluivoutbwDritetfBtoandwri 

ptitDSCBWoltareJiiiied^Ar 

iSDnmfioniiiii))ecnoeri&v 



Immediate opening ■ 

for part-time 

receptionist for 

Lindenhurst - 

LFox Lalce 
law office; 
contact Mary at 
(847). 587-2551 



BOXER FEMALE 1- 

1/2YRS., white/black spots, 
purple collar, •Zoe", lost 17th 

St. and Sheridan Bd. ( Zion. 
(647) 872-29Z6, Tara. RE- 
WARDH ...:'■■ 

FOUND CD. CASE with CD'S 
Inside, near Gurnee Mills 
area. Call and describe to 
claim. (B47) 7.40-0126. 

DID. YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(647)223-8161. 



ATTENTION 

• CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

if you have placed classified 
advertising with , the Lake' 
land Newspapers you may re 
celve a misleading statement 
from another firm request- 
ing payment for Ibis advents 
tag. To receive proper cred 
It to your account, all pay- 
ments tor your - Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must .he made as Invoiced 
and directed, to: 

Lske-Und Newspapers 

PO 00x368 

30 S. Whitney St. 

OimysUhe. IL 60030-0366 



p iflCMSOH 



^Employment 
{Opportunities; 

• Tax Preparers 
•Experienced or 

will Train. Bilingual 
a Plus. Great Pay 
Structure 
•Just Pass Your Tax 
Course. Call Us_ 

• Receptionist 

• Book Clerk 

• Fast Tax Class , / 
starting soon 

Call (847)740-7500 
or (847)358-1040 



Can You Count? 



We need dependable people to count 
inventory in retail stores. 

• join Our Counting Staff • $8.00/hr. to Start 

• 18 years or older • Weird Hours 



Call For An Interview 



847-662-9277 

INVENTORY 
SPECIALISTS 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 






■i* 



SN0WH0W OWNERS 

OPtRAl ORS 

BOBCATOWNERS i 

OPERATORS : 

Top Pay! 

Plenty of work. Guaranteed hours. 
No wait for your money. Paid gas, 

(847)272-1747 



m 
m 



m 
E 

« 
m 
m 



»•*••#*»•■»•**■■*•**•*••»■"* «■*'■*.*»*** >*■*» ***»■■*«■■ 



... I. , m. la .- - 



.!.—„■ jmrmimmatmm 



i j » ".<. ... i 



' 




f; 



so 






C 1 /Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 1, 1999 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



rffuralTloutel 



I 



I 



.Carriers 

Noodod for US Postal 
Service. Spring Grovo & 
| Wonder Uko $10.54 to start | 
■ No bonoMa to start. Cor with ■ 
Automatic shin on column ' 
m | noodod for delivering moll. I 
I Drug screen and police check I 
! required. This fob It for part j 
I timo position with potential I 
for full lime after 2+ yean. I 
Pick up application at Pail . 
Office or call & oik for 
Drake Domel 
815475-2161 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



1000 ENVELOPES»S400C 
AT HOME! Receive $4 foi 
every envelope you stuff with 
our sales materials. Gut- 
on toed. Free Info, 24 hr. 
recording. (310) 851-2152. 
(SCA Network). 

AERIAL PHOTO COMPA- 
NY Looking for contract sales 
agents to sell farm photos 
within 2-3 state area. Proven 
earnings of $1,200 to SI, 800 
per week average. Call 
800/332-0085. Monday- 
Thursday 8am-4:30pm. Friday 
Sam- 11am. 

AG POSITIONS: AGRON- 
OMY S55K; Plant Manager 

S50K; Sales S3GK; Applicator 
S40K; Soed Sales S45K; G.P.S. 
Precision Manager $45K. Bill 
Meyer, Agra Placements Ltd., 
Lincoln, II. 217-735-4373. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may 
receive n misleading state- 
ment from another firm re- 
questing payment for this 
advertising. To receive prop- 
er credit to your account, 
all payments for your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertising 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

PO Box 268 

30'B. Whitney St. 

QrayiUkc. IL 60030-0368 

ATTENTION 

NEED 43 people 

to lose 5-1 001 bs. 

All natural. 

Dr. Recommended. 

Free shipping. 
Call 702-881 -21 96. 

ATTENTION: Keop that 
New Years Resolution 

43 people needed 

to lose weight. 

Ml Natural. 

100% guaranteed. 

Dr. Recommended. 

CalM-BOO-995-4047. 



220 



Help Wonted 
Full-Time 



AVON PROOUCTS- 

START a homebased busi- 
ness. Work flexible hours. 
Enjoy unlimited earnings. Call 
Toll Free (888) 561-AVON. 

DRIVER - ATTENTION: 
TIRED OF LONGHAUL? 
Gel home weekly. Run region- 
al and earn 37c/mile including 
bonuses. Owner/Operators 
earn 85c/mile loaded or emp- 
ty. Call 800-859-4524 or 800* 
5646262. 

DRIVER BUD MEYER 
Truck Unes Refrigerated Haul- 
ing "$1,000 sign-on bonus for 
experienced company drivers 
'Solo drivers start up to 33? 
solos drivers and contractors 
CALL TOLL FREE 877-283- 
6393 GRADUATE STUDENTS 
1-S0O-33B-6428. 

DRIVER COVENANT 
TRANSPORT $1,000 sign- 
on bonus for exp. company 
drivers 1-800-441-4384 
Owner Operators - call 1-888- 
667-3729 Bud Meyer Truck 
Unes Refrigerated Hauling 
CALL TOLL FREE 1 -877-283- 
6393 Solo Drivers and Con- 
tractors^ , 

DRIVER: UP TO $700/week 
orientation pay, Up to 35c/mlle 
to start. Great hometlme. As- 
signed, all conventional fleet. 
Lease Purchase Options. 
BOYD BROS. 800-543-8923 
EOE. 



DRIVER: WHAT ARE YOU 
LOOKING FOR?? Good 
miles, home time, good bene- 
fits. Call J & R Schugel Truck- 
ing today. We offer 'New fate 
model conventlonals 'Driver 
friendly freight 'Excellent pay 
package, Start, at .SOcpm 
w/3yrs. experience. Call 1-800- 
369-0101 Ext. 88. ■ 



EASY WORK! 

NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-51,000 part-lime at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For free Information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
Ingleslde, 111,60041. 

MEDICAL BILLING NA- 
TIONWIDE Company seek- 
ing billers. PC reaqulred, no 
experience necessary. Poten- 
tial earnings of $31,500+ In- 
vestment required. Call 800- 
524-1478. 



PET CAREI ENERGETIC 
dependable person, various 
duties involving pets. Must be 
flexible and available 7 
days/week Including wee- 
kends and holidays; Call only 
between 10am-5pm, Monday- 
Friday. Shel-Ray Pet Shalet 
(414) 857-21 83. 



lir.FMRFD IIFF ft HEALTH 

A fiFM- NEEDED. Quality pro- 
ducts, high commissions with 
advance before Issue and 
benefits. (Must qualify for ad- 
vances & benefits) Call:1-800- 
252-2581. 



DRIVERS/CDL-A GAINEY 
TRANSPORTATION. Up to 
41eYml. (Up to 36c/m!. start). 
Solid benefits. Satellite 
equipped late model conven- 
tlonals. CDL Training avail- 
able. 1-800-738-0708. 



I ErigifHiTing 

Civil Engineers/Land 
SurvcyoiVTechnicians 
located juit iwii and a full 
houn dom Chicago in scenic,. 
hiilcKk Dubuque, Iowa on ihc 
Mississippi Rivet will) skiing 
only 5 minutes. Jway, Eagle 
Priinl Software It J leading 
developer oJ CAD software nr 
(he civil engineering, mrvcying 
and hyrfisiSngy/hydraulici inter- 
national markets. Our firm his 
grown from 5 lo 20O emp'oyiti 
in 5 yean. We cuirenlry have 
opcningi lor enginccn. lurvcy- 
1 on and technician) with nneii- 
1 ence of education In the toJsw- 
] Ing arrai: civil engineering, sur- 
veying, or hydrology/hydraulic*. 
Pui.o will include software 
dejign, supjxMT. resting and 
coruului inn of our clients. VVu 
offer Hock options, profit ihar- 
ing, llrxk purchase |>mgram, 
40 Hlsl, casual work environ- 
ment and growth opportunities. 
Il you think 'outside the bcn*. 
we want you to juin our young, 
outstanding team in Dubuque, 
which olfcri low crime, 
I allrinlablc hooting ami excellent 
school*. Please send a 
confidential resume by email: 

hiOcaglcpaint.com, las 

Ul a )SSrj-532l t» visit uial 

www.caglcnuint.com. 

Eagle Point Software 

Deal. CSN 122H 

4111 Wnlmirk Drive 

Oubuqur, Iowa 5100MH7 

EOE 



■ ACCOUNTS ■ 

RECEIVABLE 

REPRESENTATIVE 

FULL TIME 

LAKELAND MANAGEMENT 
SERVICES, a physician 
practice management 
organization affiliated 
with Highland Park 
Hospital, Is seeking a elect 
lcatcd individual to join 
our Medical Practice team 
In Highland Park. This key 
Individual will work 
Monday-Friday, with a 
flexible a.m. starting time 

Must possess knowledge 
of insurance claim pro 
ceasing, experience in the 
medical billing field and 
strong Interpersonal and 
computer skills. Current 
CPT Certification and ICD 
9 knowledge a must 

We offer an excellent 
compensation package in 
a dynamic and friendly 
environment Please for 
ward resume to: 
Attnt Raymond Kohn 
LAKELAND MANAGEMENT 
SERVICES, 809 Park Ave 
West, Highland Park, 
IL 60035. 

PAX: 847-433-9809. 
(eoe m/f/dYv) 

XJULELAJCD HAKAQEMJENT 
SEKVICXS 

Affiliated with 
Highland Park Hospital 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time 



SECURITY 
PROFESSIONALS 

A world leader In 
proicciive services Is look- 
ing for upscale Security 
Officers -any college 
degree, any prior military, 
security 
supervisory cxp. 
considered. Wages 

starting $8,50. 
Openings avail. In 
Munclclcin, 
Interested indiv. should 
contact our 24 hr. recruit- 
ment line at 
630-620-0273 
or fax a resume to 
630-620-0897 
THE WACKEN HUNT 

CORP. 

EOE/IWF/DAr* 



IRON 
WORKS 

• CDL DRIVER 

INSTALLER 

FULL-TIME 

•OFFICE 

PART-TIME 

MALE OR FEMALE 

APPLY AT: 

SHEA'S IRON WORKS 

735 N. MILWAUKEE AVL 

RT.83 

^ LAKE VILLA, IL ^j 



^ ^HFA'<* ^ i; AUTOBODY TECH 



Eiurkntid h bod/ fnm« md 

mtfinrtol Kpale fcn* shop otVi 

htakh bum**, 401V. proftt iharinf. 

Sskry based on uptriev «. ICarfSAc 

nksW rxtrVrrtdApolv h (urton of 

hx rttum* tax ADAMS CARSTAft 

SSS9 Pyolt rlilifca blrWrfi&vR. 

W103FAX8I5O54-0IM 



Immediate opening 

for full time 

REAL ESTATE 

SECRETARY 

for Fox Lake law office; 

experience required; 

competitive benefits. 

Contact Mary at 

(847)587-2551 



Imiueit 



CURRICULUM SECRETARY 
O'PLAINE ROAD CAMPUS 



9 1/2 month position 

Attention to detail, organizational, and 

computer skills (including database) necessary 

Send letter of interest and resume by 1/15/99 to: 
Mary M. Olson, Assoc. Principal 



Warren Township High School 



500 N.O'Plainc Road 
Gurnee, I L 60031-2686 



EQUITY 
Openings 




=£ 



Internet 



Opportunities 

Lakeland netDIRECT, 
ChicagolaneTs premier Internet 
access provider, has ground floor, 
opportunities for people interested 
in the Internet. We are looking for- 
a Project Administrator to coordi- 
nate the development of the web 

sites for businesses and 

organizations. If you are interested 

in creating a future with a rapidly 

growing organization, fax resume 

to 

skw, (847) 223-8810 

ore-mail: skw@us-netdirect.com 



Start nie 

New Year Riglitl 

Equity Tr.iii5|)orr.uioii Co. 

of Guild Rapids, Ml 
lus expanded to the Aurora 
area. We need 10 add'l exp'd , 
OTR Drivers to operate from I 

Aurora, IL to Lansing, Ml, 

Dayton, Oil & various points! 

in neighboring states of IL, 

MO. IA, Wt, Also ask about 

round trip runs to AR ft TN. 

Our freight is 95% 

"no touch" to the Driver. 

You can be home during the | 

, week ft/or wkuds. Yon will 

be assigned late model; top 

of the line Conventional 

eqpmt. After trial period, 

tractors will be assigned to 

Drivers wiio drive f/T. 

We offer all the bnfls plus 

a aggressive pay for 

aggressive Drivers. CDL 

endorsement "A" req'd. 

Call Ed Stoga after 10a, 

M-F for appt: 

800-688-4123x221 



Do you love children?! 

Local 

daycare / preschool 

looking for qualified 

teachers, aids, after 

school club leaders. 

The ideal candidates 

will have experience, 

education nnd/or CDA. 

Full time and part time 

positions available. 

Please call 

Calvary Christian 

Learning Center at 

847-265-0580 for more 

information. 

134 fvlonaville Rd. 

Like Villa. IL 







Do you enjoy variety? 
Do you enjoy a challenge? 
Do you thrive in a fast- 
paced, dynamic environ- 
ment? If so, you could be 
the person we're looking for! 
Lakeland Newspapers is 
looking for someone to join 
our exciting sales depart- 
ment. You will be a success 
if you possess organization- 
al and communication skills 
and are self-motivated. If 
you are interested in this 
exciting opportunity, please 
send your resume to: 




^ 



Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268, 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

Attn: Maureen Combs 



ik)i,s.,ilisHM«itHit|.Uiriaii'kiliiJri,jj<i i 



220 



Help Wauled 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wauled 
Full-Time 



National leader In 
extended stay lodging is 

currently seeking 

candidates for its location 

in Gurnee. 

Wc wish to fill the . 

following positions: 

FRONT DESK 

If you a high energy, 

enthusiastic team player 

with pleasant people skills, 

please apply in person to: 

Extended Stay America 

5724 Northridgc Dr. 

Gumcc, IL 60031 

. 847-662-3060 

EOE/Dmg tested 



WE'RE UPS12NG 
NOW HIRINGl 

$2O-30K 
Income Potential 

jotioHshy sucoossfU sdr- 

hg organization. 

If youro rnatLra, sports- 
rrtndea 8 octavo H ssUrg 
based on astomor needs 6 
service you meo bo qxtfad 
for tHs position. Wq offer 
expensfrpeti traHns coro- 
ptata benefits, Sguorantoad 
rxoma to Start 

For ccnskteTBtlon send 
resume to 

400 Skokto BrVd SUte 450, 
NorOtjrook. L 60064 
ATTNi rvWK BARUETT 



AMOCO/SPLIT SECOND 

r is on the move 

Come Join our fast growing 

convenience retailing concept 

Great full & part time opportunities. 

Up to $10 an hour plus benefits 

looking for cashiers, dell people, leads 

& assistant managers for our new 

Grayslake Location * 

(corner of fU 45 & 120) OTc^ 

Call 800-884-29 1 




/W EC/I 8T0R£ 



nn.ia.TiMR 



FINANCE CLERK - LARGE VOLUME AUTO DEALER IN 
GRAYSLAKE SEEKS WELL ORGANIZED AND DEPENDABLE 
INDIVIDUAL ADP & AUTO EXPERIENCE HELPFUL 
FAX RESUME 847-223-5985. 

PART-TIME 



GENERAL OFFICE - SEEKING DEPENDABLE & MATURE 
INDIVIDUAL TO ASSIST OUR SALES DEPT. DAY OR EVENING 
HOURS AVAILABLE. SAT. HOURS VARY. 
CALL TONI 847-223-865 1, EXT. 3064. 



«■;.;;;- 












^sl 


^1 




Ssl 

-■m' J 


isW'r ' * r^ 


■VflSiy) 




am 


Ui 



How To 

Sitndye 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Dear Search, 

Is there a limit as to how many limes a person can apply Tor 
unemployment compensation? The reason I ask, Is that a friend of 
a friend, has been receiving unemployment checks for what seems 
to be several years now. He will lake a job here or there for a week 
or two and then sits back and picks up odd jobs for cash. It appears 
as though he is Living quite comfortably and brags about this. 
Personally, It makes me sick. Does anyone follow up on people tike 
IhisM.R. • Llndenhurst 

DearA.R., 

How many limes con a person apply for a job? Possibilities m ay 
be endless, or to most, preferably few and Tor between. lust because 
on individual applies for unemployment compensation does not 
necessarily make them eligible. Recipients are required on a week- 
ly basis to turn In a list of companies they have contacted for 
employment. Failure to file these forms weekly results In a loss or 
wages. Furthermore, failure to report accurate Information, or 
reporting of fraudulent Information, con result not only In loss of 
wages, but can also have legal ramlflcallons such as reimburse- 
ment and, In some cases, Incarceration. There are special groups 
affiliated with the Department of Unemployment Security that are 
specifically designed to follow up on weekly claim forms to be sure 
that the information as (o their active work search is valid. These 
groups will contact companies to Insure that If an Individual claims 
to have applied for a Job with the ABC company.-they In fact did so. 
Every unemployed wage recipient should take the Department of 
Unemployment seriously. The system should not be abused. The 
people who suffer are the taxpayers In this country. If you know of 
someone who is wrongfully receiving unemployment wages while 
currently working, you may contact your local Department of 
Unemployment Security (Waukegan). If on the other hand any 
readers out there feel thai they hove wrongfully been denied unem- 
ployment compensation, It Is your right to contact the 
Unemployment office where you applied and ask to go before on 
Arbitration Officer who can make a final determination. In either 
caic.be sure you have all the facts ready. 

Letters can be sent lo Nancy Sakol 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 
P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 



L . » » S * 1 i . ', 1 



January 1, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C1 .1 



IV 



220 



Help Wanted 
full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Health Care 

■ ACCOUNTS ■ 

RECEIVABLE 

REPRESENTATIVE 

Please see our ad under 
-ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
REPRESENTATIVE" fn today's 
paper. ' 

LAKELAND MAMADEMENT 
SERVICES 



Banking 

Friendly, growing 
community bank seeks 
sales associate for 
In-store bank branch 
located In north cen- 
tral Lake County. Teller 
and/or new accounts 
experience helpful but 
not necessary. 

Please mall resume to 
C. McFarlane 
RO. Box 270 
Grayslake, IL 60030 .: 



22^ 



i SALES 

Internet Technology & 

Marketing Position. 

Dynamic web page builder, 

e-commorce, telephony. ISP'i, 

communication products. 
Training provided 24/7 tech- 
nical support, I00K+ 

Not MLM. 
For Dctalli Call Frank: 
\ (B47) 265-5691 



nenc 
Insulati© 
Installers 

Needed 

■'" ixtnm 

firing Bon 

\Southern Wl 

& 




••jv 






PHOTO 



MmE 



\ 



oten mms Portrait 

Studo h Ubertyvlle \\ 

seeks Photographer 

starting Irnnedately. 

Locking for exp. In 

customer service 8 

working w/crfldren 

PafcJ trafc*>g 

w/aoVancement 

opportunity. 

$750 to $9.50/hr. 

800-249-4555 
ext 7246 or 
630539-0965 



jgNorthern IL area$ 
guilders, Insulation * 
pi 5)675-00851 



WASTEWATER 
TREATMENT 

i 2 Positions - 
1 EPA Certified, 
1 Entry Level 

Ability to lift 50s, CDL 

Class B or ability to 

. obtain required. 

Mcchnnica (/electrical/ 

math/computer skills a plus 

Apply In person 

Monday- Friday 

0:00 a.m. to ii:30a.iri 

Island Lake Sanitary District 

420 Timber Trail 

Island Lake, IL 60042 

^ (847)526-3300 



TelerrTsrketlng or 

Customer Service. 

$8.00-$10.00/Hr 

Call Today 

for Interview 

244-0016 
or 549-0016 



Superior 
Personnel 



LANDSCAPE DESIGNS 
AND SALES 

McKay Nurtery U teeking a " 
prateulonal to fill thlf potitlon. 
Good communication skills and 
the ability to work Independently 

are estentlal.The petition 

require! innovative design ikilli 

with itrong horticultural and tales 

Interest. Eiubllihtd over 

"100 yean, we have product.' 

reputation and experience to 

attiire your success, 

Send resume tc: 

HcKiy Nun cry Company 

PO.Bok IBS 

Wnerloo.WI 535M 

Fa»c»2rM78.J6IS 

AN EQUAl QfPORTUNITY EMPtOTf R 



Food Service 




....... ' :■: ■->•, 



START OFF 
THE NEW YEAR 
WITH VICTORY! 

Looking for a new 

opportunity, and 

great benefits? 

A , Our beautiful restaurant located at The 
Village at Victory Lakes, Lake County's newest 
retirement village, has opportunities for the 
following positions: 

Baker - F/T Morning/Days 

Plans and prepares baked goods and desserts 
for our restaurant and country store. Must have 
at least 6 mo. baking experience. 

Cook - P/T Evenings/ 
Weekends 

Prepares and cooks menu items and dally 
specials. Must have at least 2 years banquet/fine 
dining cook experience. 

Cook Assistant - F/T & P/T 
Days/Early Eves 

Assists' the cook In preparing and plating menu 
items as well as maintaining a sanitary department 
and dishwashing rotations. Our complete benefits 
package offers paid vacations/holidays, medical/, 
dental plans, discounts on Victory Memorial 
Hospital services, company-sponsored pension 
plan, tax sheltered annuity plans, tuition/ 
certification reimbursement, and morel 



s Qualified candidates should contact Sara. for 

4^ Immediate consideration at 647-356-4673. The 

j^ -m— Victory Lakes campUs Ih'Llndenhurst Is 

▼" located oh Grand Avenue CRte 132) 

.. • between 83 and 45. EOE .' - 





hTHEVhMGE 



at Victory Lakes 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



HcIp.Wanlqd. 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



saBEfiiti 



Hair Stylists. Rail 
Techs, Eslhelic.ans £ ' 
Massage Therapist 
wanted for trendy 
pew salon. 
Setto open 2/1/99 
i excellent comp. pkg. & 
l career advancement. 
NW Suburbs area 
leave message 
% (847)772-5005 
pV , Pamela \s**Wfe 



• III .Ht||..|HM'-l ,|| ••III 



Start a Home-Based Business. 

Work Flexible Hours. 

Enjoy Unlimited Earnings. 

AVON 

Call Toll Free (800) 735-8867 



POSTAL JOBS 
to$18.35/HR 

INC. BENEFITS NO 

EXPERIENCE. FOR APP. 

AND EXAM INFO, 

CALL 1-800*813-3585 

EXT 2406 

8AM-9PM, 

7 DAYS fete, Inc 



WILDLIFE JOBS 
to$21.60/HR 

INC DENEFITS. GAME 

WARDENS SECURITY, 

MAINTENANCE, PARK 

RANGERS, NO EXP ; 

NEEDED. FOR APP. AND. 

EXAM INFO CALL 

1-800-B13-350S, EXT 2407 
8AM -9PM, 7 DAYS fds inc 



Automotive 

Certified GM/ASE Techs 

Immediate Openings, 

Interested In relocating 

to the good life? SE Georgia 

multi-franchise dealership 

seeks cert Techs. Must have 

adequate tools & ability 

to perform quality • 

' workmanship. 5 day wk. 

Excbn.tpkg + 401K. 

I Call Wes Sparling M-F 
800-684- 6348/912-764-W11; 
aft 6pm &wknds 912-764-9014 



H*t>Wanwd 

Software Support 
Specialist. Full knowl- 
edge of Windows 95 
a must. Knowledge of 
NT helpful. Full bene- 
fits. Fast growing con- 
cern. Put your knowl- 
edge to work. • 

Apply In person: 
Inaeomp Computer Systems 
820 Lakttld* Drive, Suit* 6 
Quma«,IL 60031 



Are Your Hours 

This Good? 
Wl-F 7:30-3:30 



NO NIGHTS 

r NO WEEKENDS 

NO HOLIDAYS 

Residential Home Cleaning 

CAH REQUIRED. 

PAID MILEAGE 

Dependable people apply in per 

son 9anv4pm 

merry maids, 

HanM Ci*{J*lrtg 

300A N. Sqymcuf 
MunrJeifln 
I 847-970-9380 



RECEPTIONIST 



e Forest Pediatrics 

is seeking a full time 

receptionist 

Duties include 

answering phones, 

appr. scheduling and 

patient registration 

Experience « plus! 

Call Traccy at: 
(847) 295-1220 



■ usmikWM^mGmm 



ARE YOU PERSISTENT, 

DEPENDABLE, OUTGOING, 

RESPONSIBLE & ORGANIZED? 

Lakeland Newspapers has the perfect career 

opportunity for you in bur exciting sales 
department. This job involves sales calls out- 
side the office so a dependable car is necessary. 

We offer great benefits! 

• Salary plus Commission 

• Health Insurance 

• Dental Insurance 

• Disability & life Insurance 

• A Matching 401 K Han 

• Gas Allowance 

• Phone Reimbursement 

So if you're self-motivated, highly organized, 
and very personable, you're sure to be a success. 

Experience a plus, but will train the right^ 

person. For an interview appointment call 

Bob Ulmer 

Lakeland Newspapers 

(847)223-8161x113 



* • M 



; SYSTEMS ; 

* ADMINISTRATOR ; 



Chicagaland's pre- i 

mler internet 
Service Provider is 
in search of a 
, Systems 
Administrator due I 
to rapid growth. * 
This individual will * 
manage the UNIX £ 
and NT systems, if * 
you aro interested ; 
| .7? creating a future i 
I with a rapidly grow-* 
* ing i organization, fax} 
. resume to ekw, 
{847)223-8810 

ore-mail: 
dkw&uaitet^rectcom i 



a 



RECEPTIONIST/ 

OFFICE HELP 

FULLTIME 

SMALL OFFICE SEEKS 
BRIGHT, QUICK INDIVIDUAL 
TO PERFORM DUTIES TO 
INCLUDE RECEPTION. TYP- 
ING, DATA ENTRY FOR AP & 
AR. AND OTHER VARIOUS 
OFFICE DUTIES. EXCELLENT 
BENEFITS. FRIENDLY WORK 
ENVIRONMENT PLEASE FAX 
RESUME TO: 
647-549-9714 ' 
• OR MAIL TO 
35 BAKER RO. 
LAKE BLUFF, IL G0O44 



UH 



Banking 

Friendly, community 

bank seeks 

experienced, full-time 

proof operator and 

general bookkeeping 

assistant 

Daytime hours. 

Apply In person or 
call Scott Homer 
at 847-548-3000, ... 
Extension 14. 




Seeking Honest, Hard-Working, 
Dependable individual for 
FULL-TIME 
ADMINISTRATIVE POSITION 
for apartment complex located in Lake * 
County. Requires working with, people and | 
variety of paperwork. Computer 
knowledge helpful, will train. 
- Send resume to or call: 
Meridian Group 
104A Maple Ct. 
RocheUe, EL 61068 
815-562-1867 





Is your pet a 



^ 



. .- ••^ , ?- 



ScnrJ us a picture and maybe your pet will be the next 

PET OF THE WEEK! 

Send us your favorite photo and any Information about the 

pet you would like to see mentioned to Lakeland 
Publishers, Attn: Classified PET OF THE MONTH, P.O. 
Box 268, Grayslake, Illinois 60030. Sony, photos cannot 
be returned. All Information is subject to editing. ^J 




Medical Opportunities 






CARE 

Direct Care Workers 

for MR/DD women in 

residential setting. 

All shifts available. 

Full Time or 

Part Time, We are 

committed to quality 

residential care. 

Contact 

Gail Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 




V 



Happy New Year 

from Lakeland 

Newspapers 



********************** 



$MRR 

Immediate full time posi- 
tion available in our 
Lake Zurich Intermediate 

Care Facility. Will he 
responsible for planning, 
developing, and supervis- 
ing case management 
activities for MR/DD.. • 
. \{jvpmen\ Bdclielor's 
.Degree and one year 
experience with MR/DD 
population required, 

CtrnUct Gall Becker L 
Ms unt Stlnl„tlescph. 
L«ke Zurich 
(€47)438-5050 



Immediate Full 

& Part Time 

positions 

available in our 

Lake Zurich 

facility. 

For D/D Women. 

Experience not 

required. 

Willing to train. 

9 p.m. - 6 a.m. 



Contact Gall Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

V 847-438-5050 A> 



\ Health Care Commercial I 
Insurance Biller' > 

I 

' Growing company Is adding 

new department and 

looking for experienced 

candidate to grow with the 

business. Selected individual 

must have knowledge of 
' UQ92 fields and billing 
requirements for various 
commercial Insurance 
1 carriers. Responsibilities will 
include submitting claims 
• and following up for ' 
' payment. Will liavc 
' demonstrated ability lo 
' work, volume caseload 
1 within computer queue to ' 
' process claims in limited 
1 time frames. Accuracy to 
1 detail, good phone skills and ' 
1 positive customer service . ' 
approach a must. For ' 
1 immediate consideration fax ' 
1 "-'resume to; .' 

> ■(!'.. : S47r887-B501- ....:. < 
1 ailn; D. Deiuuiaidl ' 
I , or mall to ! 

I 860NorUipolntDlvd." -J 
I . Waukegan,lL 60085 I 



^ A skilled care nursing k 
facility is now accept- |V 
ing applications for 
Service Aides. Duties 
consist of non-resident 
care. Job entails pass- 
ing of meat trays, 
transporting residents 
within the . 
building, passing 
linens, organizing a 

resident's room. 
For more information, 
please call: . 

k UhertmrlUe \ 
J Manor I 

% 610 Peterson Rd. ■ • 

LHwrtyvillc, IL 
I (847)367-6100 



I 



I 



Looking 
for that 
perfect 

employee? 

Place your 
ad here. 

Call Paula 

orDarrell 
(847) 

223-8161 



NURSING ASSISTANTS 
WE'VE GOT CLASS 
HILLCREST NURSING CENTER 
IS NOW OFFERING IN-HOUSE 
CNA TRAINING 
"EARN WHILE YOU LEARN" 
CLASSES START MID JANUARY 
10 PER CLASS APPLY EARLY 
APPLY IN PERSON 
1740 NORTH CIRCUIT DRIVE 
ROUND LAKE BEACH 
(847)546-5300 



s> 



mm 



CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS 
Full / Part Time 

Wo are seeking energetic, compassionate Individuals 

to join our professional care team.We are a 

' . mulll-level care facility offering a pleasant work * - 

•v." environment fo' dedicated care-givers interested ';■ 

Jn hands-on care..You will be - rewarded With' a ■ 

comprehensive salary and benefits package,' 

Salary, $3,50 hr-$9.00br . f 

LiBERTYVILLE ; MANOR 

610 Peterson' Road (Hivy 137) 
Libertyvilte, IL 60048 - - 

(847)367-6100 



u 



i)i 



* m ■ - . 



C12 /Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 1,1999 






220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Wanted 

DELIVERY DRIVERS 

& WAITRESSES 

flexible hours, 
competitive wnjjes, 
excellent working 

conditions. 

Coritof t frank tin: 

GOLDEN PANDA 

CHINESE RESTAURANT 

■112 lArSttrrt. An limit 

(847)838-1088 



Insurance 

■ ACCOUNTS ■ 

RECEIVABLE 

REPRESENTATIVE 

Please ace our ad under 
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
REPRESENTATIVE" In today's 
paper. 

LAKELAND MANAGEMENT 
SERVICES 



Experienced 

SALES 
help wanted 

for floor 

covering store. 

Call John at: 

AMERICAN 

FLOOR SHOW 

(847) 662-7900 



* Cashier/Receptionist v 

J M-F 8AM-5PM 
J Lake Villa Chrysler J 
Plymouth Jeep 

Answer phones, J 
; ! money handling, * 
| light bookkeeping ; 
« Call Mr. Kussmann J 
t ! for apph 2 

817-335-4500 

j 

817-356-2530 



SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 

names listed below for further information. 

Adlai E. Stevenson High School District #125 
Two Stevenson Drive, Lincolnshire, 1L60069 

Contact: Personnel (847) 634-4000 

Aptakisic - Tripp School District #102 
1231 Wciland Rd, Buffalo Grow, IL 60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak (847) 634-5338 

Big Hollow School District #38 
34699 N. Ilwy 12, Inside, IL 60041 

Contact: Ms. Buchncr , . . (847) 587-6800 

Day School / NortUbrook 

3210 Dundee Road, Northbrook IL60062 

ponlacl: Edc Snyder. .- . .... (&47) 205-0274 

Decrflcld School District #109 

517 Deerfield Rd. Deerfield.IL 60015 

Contact: Phyllis x-222 (847) 945-1844 

Grass Lake School District #36 

26177 W. Grass Lake Road, Antioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Pat Reed or Sue (847) 395-1550 

Grnyslakc School District #46 

450 N. Barron Blvd., Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact:}^ Fabry x-1 100 (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

Contact: Shah Keena (847) 367-3279 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 

95 W. Deerpaih, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie ; . .' (847) 604-7423 

Lake Forest High School District #115 

1285 North Mckinley Road, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Wendy Anlriin x-1 18 (847) 234-3600 

Lake Villa School District #41 

131 McKinlcy, Lake Villa, IL60046 

Contact: Kalhy (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School Dist. #187 

2000 Lewis Ave,, North Chicago, IL60064 

Contact: Mona Armstrong (847) 689-8150 

Northern Suburban Special Education District 

760 Red Oak Lane, Highland Park, IL 60035 

Contact: Bill Chans , (847) 831-5100 

Wauconda School District #118 

555 N. Main, Wauconda.IL 60084 

Contact: Katliy x-104. .; (847) 526-7690 

Waukcgan Public Schools District #60 

1201 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan, IL 60085 

Contact: Personnel . (847) 360-5404 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake, IL6003O 

Ow/ffrtMlchelle '.. (847) 856-3605 

Young at Heart Center 

610 Peterson Road, Libertyvillc, IL60048 

Contact:\Is'A or Leslie . . (847) 367-61 10 



225 



Business 
Opportunities 



225 



Business 
Opportunltes 



INTERNATIONAL AS- 

SESSMENT FIRM seeking 
entrepreneurs with executive 
presence to open local office. 
Our firm's structure, pro-, 
ducts/services ensures suc- 
cess for right person. Call 
Russ Meier, 1-800-880-2909, 
ext. 1 41 . www. profileslnterna- 
tlonal.com 



MAIL LETTERS 
FROM HOME. 

• Earn thousands, like us, 
We'll tell you who pays best, 
Act now to secure your future. 
- For FREE information, write: 
WM Enterprises, 
P.O. Box 462, 
Lake Bluff, III. 60044. . 



225 



Business 
Opportunities 



324 



Farm Guide 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



BEAUTY SALON ESTAB- 
LISHED fully equipped Wau- 
kogan Beauty Salon available 
for rent. Entire salon or station 
rental considered. (847) 
672-2530. 

C ALU NO ALL LAKE COUN- 
TY MOM'SIII Bright Begin- 
ning's Fa/nlly Day Care Net- 
work Is looking for nurturing, 
responsible, creative Individu- 
al's who would like to start 
their own bulsness while stay. 
Ing at home with their children. 
If you live In Lake or McHenry 
County and would like assis- 
tance In getting licensed, on- 
going technical assistance, 
training, equipment landing, 
and child referrals this pro- 
gram Is for you, For mora In- 
formation on how to become a 
quality infant and toddler day 
care provider In your home 
call Dena Thompson at (847) 
356-4112 

MAILORDER BUSINESS 

EXPLODINGI 

Work from Home. 

Earn $499-$2,400/mo. PT. 

$5,000/mo. FT. 

Need help nowl 

Call Tracy (800) 204-7048. 

www.newestway.com/l 065. 

WANT TO REACH 8 MIL- 
LION HOUSEHOLDS? You 
can now place your ad In more 
than 600 suburban newspa- 
pers reaching more than B mil- ' 
Hon households around North 
America with one simple call at 
a low, low cost. For details call 
800-356-2061. (SCA Net- 
work). 



THREE ANGUS FEEDER 
CATTLE. (815) 675-2429, 
(815) 675-2305. 



328 



Firewood 



FIREWOOD 2 YEAR sea- 
soned Firewood, delivered. 
Mixed wood, 1 -face cord, $65; 
1-full cord, $165. Oak, 1-face 
cord, $75; 1-full cord, $195 
(220 pieces In face cord). Stak- 
Ing available. (647) 546-0656. 

FIREWOOD DELIVERED 

OR PICKED-UP. 

Insured tree and shrub 

trimming. 

Reasonable rates. 

(847) SB7-Q586. 

FIREWOOD OAK, $50 
face, $135 card, picked up. 
Delivery extra. (414) 
694-6960. 

FIREWOOD SEASONED 
HARDWOODS. Mixed* 

$65/F.C. Oak-$75/F.C. Prompt 
free delivery (847) 247-1700. 



HUTCH, CAN BE used with 
Traditional or Early American 
Furniture, like new condition, 
$400/bost. Dresser wllh 4- 
drawers. 2-Celling fans. (414) 
652-4910. 

OVAL TABLE WITH 
smoked glass,' 4-chalrs, $200. 
White Futon bunk bed, 
$500/bO3t. (647) 526-3070. 

SOFA AND LOVESEAT, 
cream with blue and floral 
. print, good condition, 
$425/best. 3-plece wall unit, at: 
mond wllh brass trim, bar In 
middle. Very good condition, 
$625/best. (847) 222-9558. 

THREE PIECE BEDROOM 
SET, early 1950's. Moving De- 
cember 27th. $450/best. Call 
between 7pm-12am, Monday- • 
Friday (647) 223-0632. 

WATERBED MOTION- 

LESS WATERBED, top of 

(he line leather. For details 
(815)344-5630. 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 






AFTER YOU'VE 




CARPET INSTALLERS 

LOOKING FOR 

SIDE JOBS. 

Used carpet may be available. 

Reasonable rates. 

15% OFF THROUGH 

JANUARY. 

Contact Scott 

(847) 973-9247. 



250 



School/Instruction 



PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now lor students 

Byra. to adult.' 

Over 25yrs. experience. 

REASONABLE RATES. 

(847) 356-2780. 



304 


Appliances 



KENMORE WASHER AND. 
DRYER, $250. (847) 
606-8474. 

USED APPLIANCE SALE. 
Major appliances, NEW AND 
USED all reconditioned & 
guaranteed. Delivery & In- 
stallation available, Best pric- 
es around. 

Wahl Appliance Center 

1209 Court Street 

McHenry, IL 

(815)385-1872. 




BEANIE BABY SHOW 
January 2nd. 81 0th., 

1pm-6pm. 

Great Lakes Navy 

Youth Center, 

Building 2600 

Pennsylvania Ave. 

1-94 North to Buckley Rd., go 

East about 6 stop tights, 

right Into Navy Base to 

Forrestal Village. 

(847) 688-0846. 



314 


Building Materials 



STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
40x60x14, $8,187. 50x75x14, 
$10,760. 50x100x16, 

$14,631. 60x100x16, $16,863. 
Mini-storage buildings. 

40x180, 38 units, $17,818. 
Free brochures, www.sentinel- 
bulldings.com, Sentinel Build- 
ings, 800-327-0790. Exten- 
sion 79. 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL 
RACOON SHORT JACK- 
ET. Excellent condition, 
$200/besL (847) 356-1 148. 



HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and there 
Is still things that Just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It MINK FULL LENGTH 
under the 'FREE or Glvea- COAT. Ranch Black Diamond, 
ways" classified column. FREE size medium, approximately 
ADS are NO CHARGE4— 3yra. old. Cost $5,500, will sac- 
(847) 223-61 61 , ext. 1 40^ rlflce $1,500. (B47) 677-3697. 




APPENDIX WEANING 

COLT, 7/months, black with 
white blaze, sire is 2yr. World 
Halter Champion, NN Impres- 
sive lines, $3,000/best. (414) 
642-9411, (414) 363-9336. 

BLACK AND WHITE GELD- 
ING 2yr. old, very calm, ride 
quiet, will make great kid's 
horse, $2,600. (847) 
683-2811. ' 

HORSE/DAIRY HAY, ALL 
types, cornstalks and straw, 
round/square. (414) 
275-2251. :";.=.; 

OLDER STEEL HORSE 
TRAILER, 2-place with 4ft. 
dresser, good condition, 
Si, 000/oest. (414) 857-7105. 

TWO HORSE TRAILER 

1992; Feather Light 5-door 
walkthru. Tandem axle with 
electric brakes, Reese hitch 
with Torsion bars. Excellent 
condition. $6,500/best. (847) 
436-0886. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



PHONE New Amerltech Cord- 
less 900MHZ, caller ID, pager 
and speaker. (414) 652-4910. 

TECHNICS DOLBY PRO 

LOGIC HOME THEATRE and 
Stereo System Includes Re- 
ceiver, 5 Disc CD player and 
dual cassette player, $550. 
Bose Theater Speaker Sys- 
tem, $500. Sony 5 speaker 
System, $300. Compaq Pre- 
sario 486 Computer System, 
$150. 166 Pentium Computer 
with monitor, $650. TV enter- 
tainment center cabinet, $175. 
. Home central alr_ system, 
$750. (847) 265-9139. 



350 



Miscellaneous 



A VERY SPECIAL SALE 
LAKE ZURICH Antiques, col- 
lectibles, household stuff, all 
must go by 1/1/99. Priced to 
sell, will negotiate. (847) 
540-651 6 for more Info/appt. 

ANTIQUE 1930'S BED- 
ROOM set, double bed, foot- 
board, dresser, mirror and 
chest, dark walnut, good con- 
dition, $400. (847) 949-B721. 

BABY FURNITURE 

BROWN Jenny Lynd crib, 
$60. Swing, $20. Brand new 
walker, $15. (847) 740-4142. 

, BALDWIN SPINET PIANO, 

office desk, chair, lamp, 2- 
drawer file, typing table, di- 
nette set. (647)392-3419. 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOMES FURNITURE 

CLEARANCE! 

Sofa/loveseat set, 

hunter green, $495. 

Sofa, white, $350. 

Sofa/loveseat, 

earth tones, $595. 

Also: Plaids, Florals, 

Leathers and More. 

Dining room sets, 10-pfece: 

Cherry, $1,395, 

Mahogany, $2,395, 

Oak $1,695. 

Other seta available. 

Also: Bedroom Sets, 

from $995, 

(847)329-4119. 

DININGROOM IMPORT- 
ED ITALIAN marble table, 
with leather chairs. Top quali- 
ty. Paid $4,500, selling for 
$1.800. (847) 549-7438. 

FORMAL DININGROOM 
TABLE, 6 navy blue uphol- 
stered chairs, 1ln. thick bev- 
eled glass top with dark hard- 
wood base. $2,400 new, ask- 
ing $700. Excellent condition. 
Must see to appreciate. (647) 
973-0460. 

HOOSIER CABINET, 

BELTER couch, piano, How- 
ard 4ft.8ln. Grand Old Choirs 
church pump organ. (847) 
244-3844. 



358 



Musical Instruments 



360 


Pets ft Supplies 



360 



Pels & Supplies 



ATTENTION MARY KAY 
REPS Over $2,000 worth of 
products plus kits. All for only 
$600. Call Lisa (647) 
785-1860. 

BEANIE BABIES AWE- 
SOME Christmas gifts. Ask for 
Betsy (647) 283-5640 leave 
message. 

DOLL HOUSE HAND- 
CRAFTED, completely fur- 
nished, beautiful. (847) 
541-4638. 

FOR SALE SNOWBLOW- 
ERS 5hp. single stage, 4hp 2- 
stage. $100/ea. (847) 740- 
2415. 

KITCHEN CABINETS, 

COUNTER top, sink,. stove 
and windows, remodeling. 
Electric fence for dogs. Best 
offer, (647) 764-8131. 

MARDI QRAS 2 tickets, 
round trip to Mardl Gras, Fe- 
bruary 13 thru 17, $363/ea. 
(647) 546-0960. 

PLAYBOY MAGAZINES, 
1950S thru 1990's, single 
copies and yearly sets. Call for 
prices. (414) 551-9360. 

ROUTE 66 WORLD 

FAMOUS WIGWAM 

MOTEL family is offering ce- 
ramic wigwam lamps, wigwam 
Incense burners, T-shirts, post 
cards, etc. Please call 1-888- 
524-2119 In Holbrook, Ariz. 

SNOWBLOWER, TORO, 
SELF-PROPELLED, 4- 
speed, 2 stage, 21 In. width, 
4hp, electric start. Small, easy 
to use. Very good condition, 
$325. Others available. Wll- 
mette (847) 679-4786 after 
5pm. 

SPYDER PAINTBALL GUN 

20oz. C02 tank with on-off 
valve, Scott Soft Armer Ther- 
mal Mask. Great condition, 
constantly maintained. Call 
evenings, leave message, 
(847) 223-1530. 

TEENIE BEANIES 1997 & 
1998, full set, $200/best. (847) 
623-5889. ■ 

WANTED: 

25 people to get paid $$ 

to loss up to 30lbs. 

in the next 30 days. 

Natural. ' - 

Guaranteed. 
(847) 916-6776. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVE! Commerclat/home 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color, cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-642- 
1310. 



60 GALLON FISH TANK, 
with stand, for salt and fresh 
water, extras.- (847) 
223-6529. / 

AFRICAN GRAY PARROT, 

3yrs. old, cage Included. Great 
holiday gift. $700. (847). 
295-1779. 

AQUARIUM 29 GALLON, 
complete, wllh fish, $100/best. 
(414)694-0860. 

BABY MACAWS BOLIVIAN 
blue and gold, large 8/weeks, 
hand fed from day 1 . Cute and 
very friendly. $800-$1,000. 
(647) 487-0047. J 

BASSET HOUND 4-MALE 

pups, shots, 11/weaks old, 
adorable, asking $300, (815) 
455-6215. 

BLUE AND, GOLD MACAW 
PARROT, tame, talking, hand- 
fed, $1.200/best. (847) 
546-7298. 

CHINESE SHARPEI, 

MALE pups, AKC, shots, 
ready 1/13, deposits accept- 
ed, $400. (815) 597-2055 
after 5pm. 

ENGLISH POINTERS 
BUDDY, Spike, Buttons 
(sold), Dixie want a home. Ex- ' 
cedent AKC Pedigree for 
show and hunting. Liver on 
white, people dogs. $350/ea. 
(847) 526-7966. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 
PUPPIES, AKC, Import lines, 
first shots, wormed, bred for 
beauty, companionship and 
protection. $400. Guaranteed. 
(414)835-4618. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 

PUPPIES AKC, $450, ready 
now, (414) 656-0898. 

GREAT DANE PUPPIES, 

Champion Rojon sire and 
dam, all fawn, male and fe- 
male, shots and cropped, 
•show and pet quality. (847) 
566-1075. 

MINIATURE 

DACHSHUND MALE, 

6/week3. (847) 249-6476. 

PUPPIES BLACK GER- 
MAN Shepherds AKC,, Ger- 
man lines, vet checked, shots, 
$400. Call Pat (847) 
973-1841. - ■ ' 

ST. BERNARD PUPS AKC; 
guaranteed, adults' also, pay- 
ments OK. $350-3750. (815) 
569-2907.- 

THE SCOOP 

COMPANY 

Pet Clean-Up Service 

Affordable Rates. 

Weekly service. 

• (847)548-4633. 

TO GOOD HOME with 
fenced yard, 1yr. old Belgium 
Malamar, female, spayed. Ex- 
cellent with females and child- 
ren. (815) 363-6903 call AM. 



TWO BOSTON TERRIER 

DOGS, with papers, 1-fernalo, 
1-1/2yra. old, 1*male, 2- 
1/2yre. old. Neither spayed nor 
neutered. To very loving 
home. (847) 578-0133. 



368 




POWER KING TRACTOR, 
48ln. snow plow, chains, 
mower deck, excellent condl- 
tjon, $1,200. (815)338-6960. 

TOOL ROOM EQUIP- 
MENT Lathe, good condition, 
$950. 36ln. shear, good condi- 
tion, $500. (847) 487-4070. 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



COUNTRY BOUTIQUE AN- 
TIQUES (Established since 
1966) Is interested In buying 
silver, china,. paintings, jewel- 
ry, glassware, furniture and 
other old objects of Interest 
(847) 546-4295. 

OLD HAMM'S BEER AD- 

VERTISING-llghted signs, li- 
quor store displays, etc., etc 
Also other brands. (847) 
B72-2926. 

RIDING LAWN MOW- 
ERS/GARDEN TRACTORS, 
10hp or larger. Running or not 
running, working or not work- 
ing. (414) 843-1403 after 
6pm, - 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION., or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC. BOXES, Nlckelo- 
doon and Coko Machines. 
Paying CASH! Call 
(630)985-2742. . 

WANTED TO BUY Class A 
Motor Home or Mini home, 
Need soon. (847) 677-3697. 

WANTED TO BUY Mini or 
Class A Motorhome. Need 
real soon. Pay cash and pick- 
up. (847) 791-1817. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



A NEW HOME FOR THE 
HOLIDAYS. ZIon, new con- , 
structlon, 1400sq.ft. ranch, 3- 
bedrbom, 2-bath, 2-car at- 
tached garage, full basement. 
In area of new homes. Still 
time to pick out new carpeting. 
$127,500. (847) 872t9704. 

BEACH PARK SCHOOLS, 
3-bedrooms, 1.5 baths, yard, 
C/A, everything stays. All for' 
$600/month..(847) 244-4292. 

BEAUTIFUL 3-BED- 

ROOM, 2,5 bath ranch with 
oversized 2.5 car garage and 
full finished basement. Knotty 
pine cathedral beam, wood 
burning fireplace, skylights, 
wet bar, too much to list, on a 
beautiful partially wooded lot. 
Asking $159,000. Call for ap- 
pointment (847)265-1111. . 




DRUM SET, SLINGER- 
LAND 10-plece, excellent 
condition, full hardware, cym- 
bals and new heads, $2,200. 
Wllmette (847) 256-1192. 

PIANO ROLAND DIGITAL 

HP1500, with bench, 2yrs. old, 
$1,500.(815)455-0033. 

THREE PIECE RED DRUM 
SET with cymbals, best for 
7yr. old or younger. $75/best. 
(847)263-1646. - 



EXPERIENCED CHILD 

CARE PROVIDER Christian 
mother of 1 willing to watch 
your child in my Gurnee home. 
All ages, all shifts, Infants wel- 
come. Call Terrl (847) 
244-3285. ^^^ 

FINEST CHILDCARE IN 
LAKE COUNTY now has an 
opening for your child. We 
have a happy, loving, safe, 
smoke-free, educational, posi- 
tive environment. With focus 
on positive reinforcement, self- 
image, growth and develop- 
ment skills. Hot homemade nu- 
tritious meals and snacks. All 
ages are welcome into our 
group of 2 other children. Ex- 
cellent references with more 
than 10 years experience ac- 
company an outstanding back 
ground. Located near Butter- 
field Rd. Call (847) 916-6111. 

FOSTER HOMES NEED- 
EDI Wanted good, nurturing 
Individuals to provide tempo- 
rary homes for children ages 
birth to adolescent. Training, 
support, compensation, day 
care provided. Contact Cathol- 
' Ic Charltles/Lake County. 
(847) 782-4242 or (847) 762- 
4243. 

LAURA'S LOVE N' CARE In 
Gages Lake has openings for 
licensed childcare. Meals, 
snacks and fun provided. For 
more information contact Lau- 
ra. (847) 548-9601. 



CALLING ALL WORKING 
PARENTSIH Winter Is just 
around the comer, have you 
planned your children's day 
care yet? Immediate openings 
for children ages 6 weeks and 
up are available In Bright Be- 
ginning's Home Day Care Net- 
work. For more Information on 
how to enroll your. child In a 
conveniently located, quality 
day care home please call 
Dena Thompson at (847) 356- 
4112. SPACES ARE LIMITED 
SO CALL IMMEDIATELY. 



LOVING EXPERIENCED 
STAY-AT-HOME mom to 
care for InfanMyr. old. 
Schaumburg (647) 303-6744. 

LOVING MOM WILL baby- 
sit In my Grayslake home, full 
and part-time. (847) 
543-4907. 



LOVING, DEPENDABLE 
INDIVIDUAL needed to care 
for B/month old twins In my Ltb- 
ertyville home. References re- 
qulred. (847) 680-7462. 

NANNY NEEDED IMME- 
DIATE, live-out, Ubertyvllle 
area, excellent salary, 1-800- 
795-7440. 



ROUND LAKE BEACH Li- 
censed caring home daycare. 
Call Rebecca fB47) 546-4330. 



' 



January!, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers /-C-1 3 



r 



500 



Homes For SaJc 



FOR SALE OR RENT Large 
2-unlt house, gracious stone 
and brick tudor with turret en- 
trance, near lake, $144,000 or 

S1,500/month, 22 Glonwood, 
Round Lake Beach. (847) 
462-1100. : 

GAGES LAKE ^BED- 
ROOMS, 1-bath, like new. 
Bad credit, no credit, bankrupt- 
cy may not be a problem. Pos- 
sible owner assist fin: Call any- 
time, ask for Stan {847} 
546-1345. 

GLENVIEW OPEN HOUSE 
Sunday 12pm-4pm, 908 Sur- 
rey Ln. New all brick, top quali- 
ty construction, 5-bedrooms, 
3.5 baths, full basement, much 
more. $839,000. (847) 
853-8378. 

WAUCONDAINTOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

OVER 55 COMMUNITY. 

New 1997 

Manufactured home 

1 -bedroom, 1-bath 

with garage and recroom. ■ 

Includes: washer/dryer, 

stove/refrigerator, 

off street parking. 

$54,900. 

1995 1 -bedroom, 1-balh, 
carport and shed, 

$39,900 
Available April 15, 1999. 

1996 2-bedroom, 2-bath 
with garage, $50,900.. 

(847) 528-5000 
leave message. 

LAKE IN THE HILLS 3-bod- 
room, 2-bath ranch, 2 -car ga- 
rage, 2-level deck with above 
ground pool, $133,500. (847) 
854-1942. 

LAKEViEW OF GAGES 
LAKE in private subdivision. 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, at- 
tached 2-1/2 car garage, large 
famllyroom, oak kitchen, fire- 
place, deck overlooking beach 
across street, Woodland and 
Warren -schools, $132,000. 
(847)223-4259. 

MCHENRY 2YR. OLD, 2- 
story home, open floor plan, 
brick and aluminum exterior, 2- 
car. garage, tile floors, cathe- 
dral ceilings, 2-fireplaces, 3- 
bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, dl- 
nlngroom, sitting room, kitch- 
en, livlngroom, .English .base- 
ment with family and tiled play- 
room, cedar deck, 2 levels and 
gazebo. Asking $184,900. 

(815)363-6253, 

PARIS TOWNSHIP BRICK 

voneer, 3-bodrooms, attached 
garage, 1 acre woodland. 
(414)878-1616, 

PARK CITY WOODLAND 
Schools, 3-bedroom, 2-bath, 
full finished basement, 
$117,900.(847)662-6882. 

PROFESSIONALLY LAND- 
SCAPED 2-story colonial on 
cul-de-sac, hardwood floors, 
new kitchen, full basement, 
large cedar deck, screen 
house and hot tub, large 
fenced yard views preserve, 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, near 
train and tolfway. Undenhurst, 
$190,000. (847) 356-1505: 

RANCH HOME ZION, 3- 

bedroom, 2 bath, basement. 
deck, aluminum siding, 2-car 
garage, C/A, new roof, kitch- 
en/bath floors, carpeting. 
$108,500. (847) 746-0959. 

VA/HUD REPOSI 

New lists weekly. 

Call Ryan & Co., Realtors 

'Your Repo Specialists.* 

Espanol. 

(847) 526-0300. 

WAUCONDA BANGS 

LAKE Summer Cottage, 908 
Madison, 2/3 bedrooms, 
$76,900. (708) 562-2033. 

YEAR OLD RANCH HOME 
Lake Como. : Corner lot 
lOOfUIOOft. 3-bedroo'm, 1- 
1/2 bath, large kitchen with 
dining area and patio doors 
leading to wood deck, large liv- 
lngroom, open concept, at- 
tached 2-1/2 car garage, full 
basement, municipal sewer 
and water, newly paved 
streets, lakerights. 10% down 
6-1/2% Interest, $790/monlh 
for 25yra. Reduced price 
$129,900. Immediate occu- 
pancy. (414) 534-7676 or 
(414) 248-1657 ask for 
Claude." 



Ail-Subs 

REPO'S 

Low down! 

••GALL" 

A company you can trust 

♦MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS* 

Liberty Re. Inc. 

630-539-6200 



500 



Homes For SaJc 



Gov't 
Foreclosures 

Beach Park 3 BR. $113,250 
Round Lake 3 BR. 

$57K,$72K&$95K 
Fox Lake TH 2 BR. $48,000 
Wnukegan 3 BR. $64,900 
Zkm2BH $72,000 

N. Chicago 3 BR. $86,250 

LOW DOWN/MAKE OFFER1 

WESTERN REALTY 

630-495-6100 

847-778-2962 



504 






Homes For Rent 



FOX LAKE ON Pistakee 
Bay, 2-bedrooms, 1-bath, 
basement, gas heat, applianc- 
es, pier, lease and security re- 
quired, $825/month. (847) 
381-9444. 

URGE HOME FOR RENT. 
Extremely close to WI/1L bor- 
der. 3 -bedrooms, 2- baths, 2- 
car garage, basement, laun- 
dry hook-ups, $i,i95/mon!h. 
Call Wendy (414) 537-2905, 

UNDENHURST SHARP 3- 
BEDROOM RANCH fenced 
yard, circular drive, 
$1,100/month. Ask for Dennis 
(847) 934-9100. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 
bedroom house with full base- 
ment, on double lot Available 
February 10th. References re- 
quired. 5995/month plus se- 
curity deposit. (847) 
945-5217. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH very 
clean 4-bedroom tri-level. 
Available January 15th. New 
appliances. Musi have refer- 
ences. 51,049/month plus se- 
curity deposit. (847) 
945-5217. 



514 



CondcvTowi Homes 



CONTINENTAL VILLAGE 
3-BEDROOM townhouse, 
Gurnee Schools, parks, War- 
ren high school. Low Wauke- 
gan -taxes. $94,800. • (847) 
336-2624. ' " '' " ■ 

FOX LAKE FOR RENT VA- 
CATION VILLAGE CON- 
DO, 2-bedroom, waterfront. 
Boating, tennis, pool, winter 
sports facilities, $685/monlh. 
(847) 256-6290.' 

GLENVIEW 3-BEDROOM, 
1-1/2 bath, fenced private 
yard, 3-parklng spaces. Avail- 
able Immediately, $1,400. 
(847) 520-5354. 






FABULOUS 

2-3 8DM 

TOWNHOME 



Wlh 1.1 baths, fireplace, 

basement, C/A 

& 2 car Kara gc. 

All appliances included, 

no nets. Affordable $950 

per month. 

Available now!!! 

Cull Kick O'Connor 

RE/MAX 

Traditions 

800-38.VS721 




AVAILABLE JANUARY 1, 2- 
bedroom mobile home, comer 
lot, with shed and carport, new 
water healer and furnace, re- 
frigerator and mini blinds In- 
cluded, $12,000. (847) 
740-2613, pager (630) 695- 
5174. 

COMMODORE MOBILE 
HOME 1984, 2-bedroom, 
front kllchen, move in condi- 
tion, with shed, Immediate oc- 
cupancy, $9,000. (847) 
623-4067. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

l WALK TO EVERYTHING 

OVER 55 COMMUNITY. 

New 1997 

Manufactured home 

1 -bedroom, 1-bath 

with garage and recroom. 

Includes: washer/dryer, 

stove/refrigerator, 

off street parking. 

$54,900. 

1996 2-bedroom, 2-bath 

wilh garage, $50,900.. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 

ROUND LAKE 2-BED- 
ROOM MOBILE HOME, all 
new Interior, appliances, 
$14,500. (615) 834-0945, 
(630) 243-2433. 



520 



ApartmenU For Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



FOR RENT 2 brand new 2- 
bedroom apartments. Down- 
town Gray slake. Ceramic tile, 
cable TV, central air, gas heat, 
incl. washer/dryer, plenty of 
parking. Close to everything. 
$800-$850/month. (847) 223- 
1008. 

FOX LAKE 3-BEDROOM, 

5- rooms, fully appllanced, 
newty remodeled, private off 
street parking, available im- 
mediately. Security required. 
$650/month. (847) 526-3341, 
(847) 873-9139. 

GURNEE 2-BEDROOMS, 
STORAGE, laumdry facili- 
ties, balcony. No pets. No sub- 
sidles. $675/month. (847) 
837-1125. 

GURNEEAVAUKEGAN 

NORTH SHORE 

APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

. Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$810*$745/monlh. Heat, wa- 
ter, air Included. (847) 
356-5474. \ 

VACATION VILLAGE 

LARGE studio apartment, 
2nd floor, laundry facilities, se- 
cured entrance, access to 
Chain O' Lakes. (847) 
336-4733. 



WAUCONDA 2-BED- 
ROOM, 2ND floor, single 2* 
slory building, completely re- 
modeled recently, 
5695/monlh plus utilities and 
security deposit. (847) 
526-8672. 



WAUKEGAN 1 & 2 bed- 
room apartments, plus utili- 
ties. Section 8 Welcome, (647) 
604-2961, 



ZION EAST SIDE DU- 
PLEX, nice 2-bedroom value, 
2nd floor, private entrance, 
carpeted, dining and living- 
room, fenced yard, wash- 
er/dryer Included, heat paid, 
3106 Elizabeth, $650/month, 
military welcome, shown by 
appointment. (847) 831-5388. 



WESTWIND 

VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Zfon 
1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREEHEAT 

Appliances • On Site 

Manager • No Pets 

Starting from 

$495/mo. 

Call Martha & Issac 

(847)746-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 



UkEWOod YilUqE Apartments 

In IslANd Lake and! GraysIake 

Offcrti.Nr, AffortdAblE lioustNq Ion QUAlifitd ApplicANts. 
Now ACCEpiirvq ApplicAtioNs bit our: 

• 1,2 an(J J bedROOM apartments 

PIease caI! For more iisfoRMATioN or AppoiNtMENi at: 
(847)225-6644 TDD# (800)526-0844 

UkEwood VilUqE Adammem is prtofEssiorWIy fi** 

MANAqed by MtnidiAN Gnoup, Inc. ■■=} 



TO! 



OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 
Qualified Applicants. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
f=t 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

Managed by Meridian Group, Inc. 



»f*HI»H 



G.P. MANAGEMENT, INC. 

1&2 Bedroom Apartments 
In Antioch & Lake Villa 



Antioch Manor Apartment! 
445 Donin Dr., Antioch 
847-395-0949 

Deep Like 

Hermitage Apartment* 

149 N. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa 

847-356-2002 




AtAlYMSMTI 




Dm* UU llnwlbp 



CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 




530 



Rooms For Rent 



538 



Business Property 
tor Rent 



ALL NEW ROOMS AVAIL- 
ABLE, on Fox Lake. Private 
bath, private entrance, A/C. 
Available Immediately. Only 
$110/week. (847) 356-2747, 
(414) 862-6066 after 6:30pm. 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



WAUCONDA AREA IN- 
DUSTRIAL AND SHOP 
SPACE FOR RENT 

1, 080sq.lt. unit, $695 plus se- 
curity. Available December 
1st. 2400sq.ft. POLL 

BARN with concrete floor. 
Heat, electric, outside storage 
can be added. Office trailer 
available. $595 as Is, Available 
12/1/96. Days (847) 
526-5000, evenings (847) 
526-0420 leave message. 



STORE OR OFFICE FOR 
RENT located In Rollins Road 
Shopping Center, Round Lake 
Beach, newly painted and car- 
peted. (847)223-4900 

SMALL MODERN OFFIC- 
ES FOR RENT IN BUR- 
LINGTON. Excellent location 
on main thoroughfare. All utili- 
ties and snow removal Includ- 
ed. Immediate occupancy. 
Call Rick at (414) 763-7686 
days, (414) 534-5258 oven- 
Ings. . 

2.500SQ.FT. IN NEW build- 
ing In Genoa City, Wise. Heat- 
ed with auto-opened 12x12 
overhead - door, 2-servlce 
doors, office, and bathroom. 
Black top drive with ample 
parking. 5890/month, (1) vr. 
lease required. (414) 
279-9700 7:30am-4pm ( (847) 
395-5294 evenings. 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



FOX LAKE OFFICE/HE- 
TAIL SPACE available, 
1199onHwy. 12, great park- 
ing. $550/monlh. (847) 
587-3183/ 



Richmond Car 

Lot orYour 

Business Use 

Brick Bldg. on Rt 12, 

Shop with overhead 

door, office, additional 

storage garage 

& sales lot " 

Excellent visibility. 

$795/mo 

Land Mgmt. 
815/678-4334 



RICrWICMVD 

Fountain Head 

Corporate Center, 

Rt 12, 

New Superior 

2500 to 7630 sf. 

units, for Industry 

or Business, a/c 

' ofc, Ccrnmon or 

Private Dock. 

$4.95/af. 

Land Mgrnt 
815/678-4771 




NO DOWNPAYMENT7 

PROBLEM CREDIT? Own 

the home you need now, with- 
out a big downpayment. Com- 
plete financing it qualified. De- 
George Home Alliance 1-800- 
343-2B84. 



BARGAIN! 
SHOPPER 



DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR $75 OR LESS? 

Place your ad In this section 

for only $3.00 for 10 words or 

less. Must be prepaid. 

Call Usa (847) 223-8161 

ext 140 or send the ad with 

wilh your payment to: 

Lakeland Publishers, 

-P.O. Box 268, 

30 S. Whitney SL, 

GraysIake III. 60030. 

Atton: Usa. 



560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



MCHENRY/MARTIN 
WOODS, HEAVILY wooded 
1 acre on cul-de-sac. (815) 
344-4269. 



568 



Out Of Area Property 



000O0O0000O000OO0O0O0O0O0O300OC 

Arizona Beat Buyl 

DesuilTul hlttorlc ranch 

property In scenic NW Arts. 

Private 40-«cre rmnch p*inl* 

now ■vallabl* from only 

$30G/act Near Colorado 

River, nihiii* , .boallnff , 

fumbling. Stunning; tunieU A 

tnta viewa. Prlillne, luah hlfti 

daicrt covered wilh aacuaroa, 

yuccas, palo verdea, Joahiuu. 

No quat, low dawn, xlnt lernu. 

100% water rlfhta. Title 

tnaured, surveyed, Kood 

access. ScUln f fasti 

Muat aee. Open dally. 

SUgocomch TralU 

1-800-711-2340 

Jcooooooooooooooooooooooooqot; 



ATTENTION 
CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 
If you have placet) class ifltd 
advertising with the Lake 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another firm request 
Ing payment for this advertls 
tag.. To receive proper cred 
It to your account, all pay 
merits for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to; 

Lakeland Newspapers 

PO Box 268 

30 8. Whitney St. 

Orayslake. It 60030-0268 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



SMALL RV SLEEPS 4, new 

tires, well maintained, $3,500. 
(847) 587-1343. 



708 



Snowmobiio/ATVs 



1687 SKI-DOO FORMULA 
PLUS, brand new track, extra 
parts, with cover, very good 
condition. 847) 973-0745 after 
5:30pm, (847) 774-8689. 

SKIDOO'S 1989 MACH 1, 
SI ,500. 1987 Formula Plus, 
$1,200. Great Sleds. (414) 
537-3667. 




1997 KS KAWASAKI PRO 
CIRCUIT 125, $3,800/best. 
(847) 356-5949. 

NORDIC TRAC MEDAL- 
1ST, $650, like brand new. 
(414)694-7883. 

PAIR OF DYNAMIC 1995 
purple/green snow sklis, with 
poles and purple/black size 
8/8-1/2 boots, excellent condi- 
tion, best offer. (847) 
395-5667. 

POOL TABLE 7FT. Bruns- 
wick, like new, all accessories, 
$950/delivered and installed. 
(847) 359-8718. 

WORK OUT GLIDER, with 
video, Kathy Ireland. Deluxe 
model. $30. (847) 541-5853. 



804 



Cars Tor Sale 



'90 MAZDA RX7 GXL, red, 
loaded, leather Interior, pam- 
pered gararge kept, low mile- 
age, $7,500. Call (847) 
223-2085 

1991 BUICK PARK AVE. 
Good condition, white with 
burgandy interior. $5,400 
(847) 975-3799. 

1992 CORVETTE CON- 
VERTIBLE white with white 
tap, garage kept, 55,000 
miles. Excellent condition. 
(815) 385-8468. 

1993 SATURN SL1, full 
power, arn/fm stereo cassette, 
new tires and brakes, $4,500. 
(B1 5) 675-6351. 

1995 SATURN SL1, 4-door. 
green/gray, automatic, air, 
new tires, $8,8O0/besL (847) 
356-6555. 

ALFA ROMEO 1971 SPI- 
DER CON V., good condition, 
no rust, runs well, red, 
S3,500/best. (647) 381-1784. 

AUDI 1983 5000, low miles, 
good condition, $1,200/best. 
(847)279-1160. 

BMW 1995 3181, EXTRA 
clean, leather, sunroof, toad- 

ed. 4-door. (847) 362-9200. 

BUICK 1985 CENTURY 
WAGON Clean and reliable. 
Asking $1 ,500/best, (414) 652- 
7952. . 

BUICK 1986 LESABRE, 
1 very good condition, 3800 ser- 
ies engine, 92,000 miles. Ask- 
Ing $2,200. (847) 526-0902. 

BUICK 1995 SKYLARK, 

$7,990. (815) 385-5264. 

CADILLAC 1991 ELDORA- 
DO BARRITZ, $9,995. (847) 
587-8300. 

CHEVROLET 1991 WHITE 

Z28 CAMARO, new transml- 
slon, new fuel injectors. Sharp. 
$9,000/best (414) 552-9739. 

CHEVROLET 1997 COR- 
VETTE, $35,990. (847) 223- 
8651. 

CHEVY 1992 CAVALIER 

Z24, power everything, sun- 
roof, black, excellent condl- 
tlon, $3,950. (847) 872-1646. 

CHEVY 1996 CORSICA, 
$7.990. (815) 385-5264. 

CHEVY 1997 CAVALIER, 
$7.690. (815) 3855264. 

CHEVY 1997 LUMINA, 4- 

door, white, maroon Interior, 
fully loaded, low miles, A/C, ex- 
cellent condition. Must sell. 
Asking $12,500/best. Please 
call (847)223-3161 after 5pm 
or leave message. 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 

Bodies, Factory-new, ■guar- 
anteed from $1300.00. Doors 
from $89.00 Fenders from 
$50.00 Beds from $800.00, 
Bedliners $169.00. Bumpers, 
Grills Reparl Panels, Paints, 
Abrasives, windshields, radia- 
tors. Delivery, Marx (217) 624- 
6184. 

CHRYSLER 1695 CIR- 
RUS, $8,990. (815) 385-5264. . 



804 



Cars For Sale 



CREAM PUFF 1966 Sable 
4-door GS (like Taurus), only 
59 K, non-smoker, garage 
kept, no door knlcks, show- 
room new, loaded Including 
power aeat, 30mpg In writing, 
original $20,500, now $6,995. 
Ceil phone (847) B45-5181 or 
(815)385-5571. 

EAGLE 1695 TALON TSI, 
$9.990. (815) 385-5264. 

EXPRESS AUTO 
EXCHANGE 

USED CARS 

We take consignment cars. 

' No charge. 

Too busy to sell your car? 

Let us do It for you. 

(847) 740-1400 * 

1 19 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. 

(Across from Burger King). 

Ask for Mike or Norm. 

FOR SALE 1064 PLY* 
MOUTH RELIANT, front 
wheel drive, runs good, 
$2,000 or will trade for truck of 
equal value. 3 blocks S. of 
Wadsworth & Greenbay Rd., 
across from Aviation Rd. 

1686 OLDS CUTLASS 
SIERRA SILVER MOON- 
LIGHT, A/C, heat, power 
locks, new tires, new brakes, 
new exhaust, new radiator, 
new cam shaft. Runs great. 
Son left for Navy. Must sell 
$1,599. Ask for Mr. Coleman 
(414) 654-6543 or leave mes- 
sage. 

FORD 1686 TAURUS 
WAGON, bfue/blue, cassette, 
3rd. seat, no rust, 1 -owner, 
$2.600. (847) 632-0613. 

FORD 1693 THUNDER- 
BIRD, excellent condition, 
loaded, CD player, sunroof, 
new tires and battery. Must 
sell. (847} 548-6164. 



FORD 1994 TAURUS ST 
HON WAGON GL, loaded, 
mint condition, no rust, no 
dents, no scratches, Interior 
like new, garage kept, 1 -own- 
er. $5 ,500/best. (847) 
824-^833. 




FORD 1996 
BIRD, $8,990. 
8651.' 



THUNDER- 
(847) 223- 



FUN CAR .1989 Honda CMc 
Si, highway miles, excellent 
shape, many mods. H&R, 
Greddy, K&N, etc. 

$2,500/best (847) 548-6652 
after 6pm. 

GEO PRISM 1698, 

$10.990. (847)223-8651. 

HONDA 1993 ACCORD LX 
4-door, $9,995. (847) 395- 
3600. 

HONDA CIVIC 1885, 

4-door, automatic, 

runs excellent, $995. 

Subaru Wagon 1986 4x4, 

automatic, air, 

runs excellent, $795. 

Toyota Tercel 1087, 

2-door, 5-speed, 

runs excellent, 

must see, $595. 

Olda Cutlass 1883, 

4-door, runs good, 

6-cylfnder, $595. 

Chevy Celebrity Wagon 

1986, 

V6, auiomalic, 

runs good, $595. 

Chevy 1977 C-20 Pick-up 

Truck, 

454 engine, 

runs excellent, $995. 

GRIFFIN QUALTTY 

AUTO SALES 

26065 W. Grand Ave. 

Ingleside, III. 60041 

(647) 973-9377 

Bruce or Greg. 

HOT RED 1695 Mazda MX6 
LS, 2-door Coupe, 2.5L 6-cy- 
linder, 5-speed manual, clean 
and loaded, 36K miles, 
$11,900/besL (414) 308-1022 
Kenosha, Wise. 

INFINITI 1995 J30'S, 6 to 
choose with similar savings, 
leather, sunroof, $16,995. 
(647) 362-9200. 

INFINITI Q45'S, 4 to 
choose with similar savings, 
$16,495. (847) 362-9200. 

LEXUS 1995 ES300, 4- 
door, loaded, low miles, priced 
to sell, $18,995. (647) 362- 
9200. 

LEXUS SC300 COUPE 
1992, pearl white,, fully loaded, 
CO, tract control.' (847) 362- 
9200. 

MAZDA 1694 626ES, 
$10,995. (847)395-3600. 

MERCURY 1988 GRAND 
MARQUIS, good condition, 
many extras, slight dent on 
panel, $2,650. (847) 
487-2853. 



■ 



*i-.i-. *-*■*' *A.<. J ... 









I ; 
















■ ■ • » ',. ( (.| 



C 1 4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 1, 1999 



804 



Qtrs For Sale 



MERCURY 1093 COUQAR 
XR7, $8,990, 615) 385-5264. 

MERCURY 1994 COUGAR 

XR7. $7,995. (847) 587-3300. 

MOVING OUT OF STATE. 
MUST SELL 1997 Black Port- 
tiac Sunfiro, 5-spood, 2-door 
sedan, A/C, cassette. Asking 
$9,900, (847) 43B-4180. 

NISSAN 1987 300ZX, ex- 
cellent condition, red, low 
miles, automatic, T-tops, 
$8,250. (847) 837-1153. 

OLDS 1993 CUTLASS SU- 
PREME, 2-door, excellent 
condition, new tires and 
brakes, extras. S5,000/bost. 
(847) 728-1982. 

OLDS 1998 CIERA, $9,995. 
(847) 395-3600. 

PLYMOUTH 1997 
BREEZE, $9,990. (847) 223- 
8651. 

PONTIAC 1996 GRAND 
AM, $10,995. (847) 395-3700. 

PONTIAC 1998 GRAND 

PRIX COUPE, $10,990, (847) 
223-8651. 

SAAB 1988 900 TURBO 
CONVERTIBLE, $6,850. (847) 
432-9300. 

SAAB 1991 900 TURBO 
CONVERTIBLE, $11,850. 
(847) 432-9300. 

SAAB 1995 900S CON- 
VERTIBLE, $17,950. (847) 
432-9300. 

SAAB 1996 900S CON- 
VERTIBLE, low. low miles, 
extra clean, $20,995. (647) 
362-9200. 

SAAB 1996 900S CON- 
VERTIBLE, low, low miles, 
extra clean, $20,995. (847) 

362-9200. 

SUBARU 1994 LEGACY, 

$8,995. (847) 587-3300. 

TOYOTA 1987 CAMRY LE, 
automatic, power locks/wind- 
ows, sunroof, A/C, AM/FM 
cassette, runs great, 
53,000/best. (847) 925-8268 
after 6pm. 

TOYOTA 1989 COROLLA 
SR5, black/gray, $1,6QO/bost. 
(847) 263-7656. 

TOYOTA 1990 CAMRY DL, 
automatic, windows/locks, 
cruise, 4-door, air, cassette, 
asking $5,500. (847) 
746-7308. ' 

TOYOTA 1990 CAMRY, 

$3,995. (847) 395-3600. 

VOLVO SELECT 1998 

S70's, 10 to choose with simi- 
lar savings, leather, sunroof, 
$24,995. (847)362-9200. 



810 



Classic/Antique Cars 



JEEP 1959 WILLY Z 
CHEVY IMPALA 327, V8. 4- 
barrel, standard trans, 4WD, 
with 8ft. Western Plow at- 
tached, fully hydraulic. Needs 
expert attention. Mechanic or 
collector dream. $2,499/best. 
(847) 622-0398. 

LINCOLN 1969 MARK III 
460, 4-barrel, fully equipped, 
black, leather Interior, good 
tires, 37K original miles. Me- 
chanlc/dealer/collector spe- 
cial. $2,499/bost. (647) 
622-0398. 



814 


Service & Parts 



BMW WHEELS SET OF 
FOUR, to fit 3, 5, 8, 7, 8 ser- 
ies. Mlfie MlQlla 5 spoke 
wheels with Yokohama AVS 
tires. 50% tread left, wheels in 
good shape, $700. (847) 548- 
1115. 

PONT. FORMULA '88 5.0L 
V8, TPI, ECM, wiring harness, 
new T-5 Trans, new B&M, 
clutch and shifter. I6ln. alumi- 
num wheels and tires. Body 
parts, post rear end with rear 
discs. VW 73 Bug doors, 
hood, bonnet, rear fiberglass 
fenders. Best offer, Will sepa- 
rate. (847) 392-1603. 



824 


Vara 



824 



Vans 



DODGE 1094 CARAVAN 
SE, met. red, 3.0 V6, A/C, cas- 
sette, PW/PL, keyless entry, 
very clean, 82 K, $6,285. (847) 
658-3074. 

FORD 1987 E-150 WORK 
VAN, 5.0 V8, 16mpg, 4-spood 
OD, A/C, garaged, no rust, 
85K, nice, 1 -owner, $2,550. 
(847) 524-2723. 

FORD 1991 CONVER- 
SION VAN, fully loaded, color 
TV, 2-tone paint, garage kept, 
mint condition, $4,800/best. 

(815) 477-3688. 

MUST SELL 1993 VW Eu- 
rovan, $17,000. (847) 
740-2064. 

PLYMOUTH 1993 VOYAG- 
ER VAN, $7,990. (847) 223- 
8651. 

PONTIAC 1992 TRANS- 
PORT MINIVAN, extra clean, 
full power, $6,995. (847) 362- 
9200. 

PONTIAC 1994 TRANS- 
PORT, $8,990. (815) 365- 
5264. 

VW 1975 HIPPIE VAN 
$1,100, runs, camper, lou- 
vered windows, In Zlon. (773) 
762-8733. 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



1984 QMC SUBURBAN 

4x4, Interior and exterior al- 
most mint, towing package 
Q.OOOIbs., chrome perfect, 
150K, In from Texas 397, only 
1 year In snow, fresh transfer 
case and water pump, 1 year 
old transmission, oil pump, 
front and rear seals, radiator, 
brakes and power steering 
pump. Asking $7,000. Must 
see. (847) 356-2490. 

CHEVY 1993 BLAZER 
2WD, $10,895. (847) 587- 

3300. 

CHEVY 1993 BLAZER LT, 

$8,950. (B47) 432-9300. 

CHEVY 1995 BLAZER LS 
4X4, $12,990. (615) 385-5264. 

FORD 1988 BRONCO, 

S5.995. (847) 395-3600. 

FORD 1994 EXPLORER 
4X4, $13.990. (815) 385-5264. 

GMC JIMMY 1993, $6,995. 
(847) 395-3700. 

GMC SUBURBAN 1990 
4X4 CONV., $6,990. (847) 
223-6651. 

GRAND CHEROKEE LAR- 
EDO 1994, very clean, full 
power, $14,995. (847) 362- 
9200. 

ISUZU AMIGO 1993, fully 
loaded, 55,500/bost. (847) 
973-0128 or voice mall 1-800- 
255-4859 ext.4689. 

JEEP CHEROKEE 1988 
with plow, good runner, every- 
thing In working order. Asking 
$1.500. (847) 872-1204. 

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LTD. 1996, leather, full power, 
$22,595. (847) 362-9200. 

JEEP LAREDO CHERO- 
KEE 4x4, 1991, new 
tires/brakes, 4-door, alarm, 
CB radio, remote starter, 1- 
owner, maintenance records, 
120K, like new $4,800. Must 
sell by 1/2/99. (630) 
372-1585. 

JEEP WRANGLER 1990, 
$4,990.(847)223-8651. 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



CHEVY 1988 FULL Size 
conversion, 3/4 ton, high top, 
TV/VCR, rear heat/AC, all 
power, 4-captalns chairs, so- 
fabed, T -owner, good condi- 
tion, $3,300/best. (847) 
429-1849. 

CHEVY 1993 CONVER- 
SION VAN, $6,995. (847) 395- 
3600. 

CHEVY. 1994 ASTRO VAN, 
$10,990.(847)223-6651. 



CHEVY 1997 S-10 PICKUP, 
extended cab, automatic, 2 
tone gray and black, loaded, 
leather, CD, hitch. Much, 
much more. Still under warran- 
ty, 22,000 miles. $15,999. 
(847) 249-2625 ask for Mike. 

DODGE 1992 DAKOTA LE 
EXTENDED CAB, $8,990. 
(815) 385-5264. 

DODGE 1993 DAKOTA, 
$5,995. (847) 395-3700. 

FORD 1989 RANGER 4X4, 
$4,995. (847) 587-3300. 

FORD 1990 XLT F-250 
SUPER CAB, 3/4 ton pickup. 
4WD, 5th wheel trailer hitch, 2- 
tanks, loaded, $8,000. (847) 

526-6550. 

FORD 1994 RANGER 
XLT/PU, $7,990. (847) 223- 
8651. 

FORD F-180 1992, 6-cylln- 
der, stick, with air, AM/FM cas- 
sette, low mileage, 
$6,500/best. (847) 356-5949. 

FORD RANGER 1969 EX- 
TENDED CAB, $3,695. (847) 
395-3700. 



834 



Tnicks/Tniilcrs 



S78 


Remodeling, 



NISSAN 1995 4X4 P/U, 
$11,995.(847)587-3300, 

TRUCK WITH PLOW 1985 
GMC 4x4 pickup, 350 V6, au- 
tomatic, power steering and 
brakes, dual tanks, steel cap, 
western pro plow, some rust, 
asking $3,200. (414) 
877-2929. 



838 


Hcsny Equipment 



1986 MAC SUPERLINER 
400 Cat Engine, $10,000/best. 
Double frame. (847) 
464-4571. 

IRRIGATION PUMP & MO- 
TOR, model 6203A, 40hp, 
phase 3. Peerless pump, a in. 
Ductal falangod, 20hp. motor. 
$650. (847) 740-7380 after 
5pm. 



DC TILE WE install floor and 
wall tiles of all kinds. Remodel 
all bathrooms and kitchens. 
Free estimates. (847) 395- 
0777. 



JACK'S 
REMODELING 

*Basement Finishing 

*Famllyrooms & Officorooms 

'Electrical & Plumbing 

•Kitchens & Baths 

•Vinyl Replacement Windows 

•Soffit Fascia. 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(847) 546-3759. 



848 



Wanted To Buy 



S93 


Trees/Plants 




USED CARS AND TRUCKS. 
Cars up to $300, Trucks up to 
$500. Running condition pre* 
ferred. (847) 740-6245. 



S33 



Handyman 



ODD JOBS CARPENTRY, 
Drywall, Trim, Painting, Electrl- 

cal, Roofing. (847) 587-0429. 



A & W TREE SERVICES 
Tree cutting and removal, also 
gutters cloaned. 7 days a 
week. Call 8am-6pm. Al Miller 
& Wayne Cook Owners. (414) 
637-4119. 



LANDUS 
338-031 



MMMdB 




Jazz is Ihls week's PET OF THE WEEK. Jazz Is 
pictured here with her best pal Josh, Being bom 
only six weeks apart they are bolh three years' 
old. Jazz loves to go meet Josh's sister, Jordyn 
at Hie bus stop. But if you don'l watch her, she 
will jump on the bus lo say "Hi" lo the other kids. 
Submitted by: Sherry.Fox Lake 

January, 1999 J 



Is your pet^ 
a star? 

Send us a picture and 

maybe your pet will be 

the next 

PET OF THE 
WEEKS 



S39 



Housekeeping 



I WILL CLEAN YOUR 
HOUSE FROM TOP TO 
BOTTOM. Reasonable rates. 

Call Ellon (414)869-4036. 

NO TIME FOR 

CLEANING? 

But need the Job done right? 

Call Maria. 

I clean weekly or 

bi-weekly only. 

Non-smoker. 

References. 

(847) 546-3759 

leave message. 

TOO BUSY WITH THE 
HOLIDAYS TO WORRY 
ABOUT CLEANING? We'll 
do it for you. Free estimates. 
Call anytime (847) 740-8599. 



S72 



Professional 
Services 



WEB PAGES 

100+ pages, j 
Change pages for froo. 
Change Pages anytime 

from anywhere. 

25 megabytes storage, 

500 megabytes transfer. 

24/7 technical support. 

Graphics, photos, 

tables, text. $600 complete. 

Hosting $1 9,95 per month. 

Dunn & Bradstreet 5A1 rated 

company. Parent company 

1 billion in sales. 

For details call Frank your 

local Independent rep. 

(847)265-5691. 




LamJus (338-03!) has a covered front porch extending ihc cniirc length of this 2,824 square foot brick 
ranch home. A standing seam metal roof with true log columns anJ porch rail comhine with a brick exterior 
lo give this home a gorgeous, country presence. The columned, vaulted porch covering with bay windows 
extending down from window dormers above on each side give added emphasis to the entry. 

Inside the nulled entry of the Landus, the bay windowed office lies to the lefi just past ihe coat closet. 
Around the corner to the left is an elevator lo ihe basement level ideal for hauling bulky seasonal items. 
Near the cniry is also a convenient half bath which works well with ihc office thai is situated near bolh the 
baih and elevator. It has two doors, one off ihe entry and one off the hall. 

From the garage entry to the home a utility room is fully equipped wilh a sink and ironing cenier including 
drying rods, as well as a freezer. A door shuts ihis area off from ihe two hedrooms across the hall. Each of 
these have large walk-in closets and a private "Jack and Jill" bath. Each share a bay windowed tub/shower 
area. Doth rooms have sliding doors onto ihcir own private covered decks, 

On the righi of the main cniry is ihe bay windowed great room combination. The entire area is vaulted 
with sunlight pouring in from a dormer above. A centrally located kitchen offers the informal eating and " 
conversation bar, and convenient access from all areas on this side of the home. A short hallway leads 
between the kitchen and dining area to the master suite. A comer walk-in pantry in the kilchen gives a large 
area for the storage of supplies, white a built-in hutch in ihc dining room adds space for those special or sea* 
sonal dishes. ■ <o<- * . 

The luxurious owners' quarters sircich the cniirc depth of ihe home, dividing to large sleeping spaces with 
a large walk-in closet (including a linen closet) and a master bath. Bolh front and rear areas have built-in 
entertainment cabinets. This area was designed to be used either as individual sleeping areas or for one area 
to be a silling room. The masier bath contains dual sinks, a shower, and an oversized spa tub, As a personal 
touch for ihc couple, each sleeping area has a vanity. 



For a study kit of the LANDUS (338-031 LP60) 
send S 14.95, to Landmark Designs, 
33127 Saginaw Rd. E., Collage Grove, OR 
97424 (Specify plan name & number for kit). 
For a collection of plan books, send $20.00, 
or save by ordering ihe kit 
and collection together for $29.95, 
or call 1.800-562-1 151. 




I 



LB ?D -ILz. 



P 1 1 P 

ii i cr-rj]]^ 






IT 





Send us your favorite 
photo and any Informa- 
tion about the pet you 
would like to see 
mentioned to 
Lakeland Publishers, 
Attn: Classified PET 
OF THE MONTH, 

P.O. Box 268, 

Grayslake, Illinois 

60030. 

Sorry, photos cannot be 

returned. All Information 

Is subject to editing. 




WAtfT 
T© SBLL 
* ^ Y©UR 
TRUCK m 

CAR? 

IFS©, 
BBSURB 

t©cXll 

LISA AT 

847-223-8161 

©R FAX HER 

AT 847-223-26*11 



! 



LETTERS . 
TO SKNTK 



DEAR SANTA, 

CHRISTMAS IS ABOUT JESUS. 

May I please have a spidernan web blaster. 

My name is Miles and I am 5. My brother 

Riley, who is 2 and my brother Cony, who 

is 5 months,, would also like toys. Would 

you please send them something nice. 

We have all been good boys. 

I am thankful fop Jesus because it is 

his birthday. I am also thankful for God. 

Thank you Santa. 

Merry Christmas 

Love -Miles. Riley 8. Cory 

P.S. I will have cookies for you in case you get hungry. 



Dear Janfa, 
MunaroefsTt/fc 






Thank 



you. 



Tyfon Stanton 



Dear Santa, 

My name is Tylar. I am H years old and 

I was good all the time. 

I would like some clothes. nlntendo.fW. 

a cd. and some people and a play set. 

I hope you get the right things that 

I want for Christmas. 

Thank yoa 

Ty!ar Stanton 






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January 1, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 






Lakeland Newspapers / C 1 5 



^^^^^^^^^w^mM 




STORES, & SERVICE 
I> I RE C TO R .Y 




M 



W 




Visit Santa 

at your 

favorite 

mall! 



•ftjrfsfiff, 



GURNEE MILLS, 

GURNEE, IL, 
C»47> 855-7800 



Grays fake Post 
Office 

449 East Center St 





Old Orchard Center 

34 Old Orchard Rd. 
Skokie, IL. 
(847) 674-7070 



Woodfleld Mall 

Golf Rd at Route 53 
SchaumburgJL 
(847) 330-1537 



Gurnee Mills Mall 

61 70 W. Grand Ave. 
Gurnee, IL 
(847) 263-7500 



Hawthorn 
Shopping Center 

122 Hawthorn Center 
Vernon Hills, IL. 
(847) 362-2600 



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CS473 855-«^97 

*f«rw a ccep ting - 
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Have A Happy 
& Safe New Year! 





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